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    2016 EM Review - Part 2: Goodbye Electronic Music Heroes

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      The second part of our look back on 2016 is dedicated to those we said goodbye to. Some of them passed with great reaction from the public and press. While others, readers may be surprised to know passed on without hardly a word. Regardless, all these people are equally important in their contributions to the world as electronic music artists. Please join us in recognizing their work, for the first time or again, as they would want to be remembered by.

       

      Paul Bley (84)
      November 10, 1932 - January 3, 2016

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      Free-Jazz pianist, Synthesizer Innovator

      In the late 1960s, Bley pioneered the use of the Arp and Moog synthesizers, performing live before an audience for the first time at Philharmonic Hall in New York City on December 26, 1969. This "Bley-Peacock Synthesizer Show" performance, a group with singer/composer Annette Peacock, who had written much of his personal repertoire since 1964, was followed by her playing on the recordings Dual Unity (credited to "Annette & Paul Bley") and Improvisie. The latter was a French release of two extended improvisational tracks with Bley on synthesizers, Peacock's voice and keyboards, and percussion by Dutch free jazz drummer Han Bennink, who had also appeared on part of Dual Unity.

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      Pierre Boulez (91)
      March 26, 1925 - January 5, 2016

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      Electroacoustic Composer, Conductor

      Boulez likened the experience of playing taped music in a concert hall to a "crematorium ceremony" and the only wholly pre-recorded pieces he composed were the Deux Etudes (1951, withdrawn). In Poésie pour pouvoir (1958) he combined taped electronic music with a live orchestra, creating a quasi-theatrical space with the orchestra and two conductors on platforms and the speakers placed behind the audience. He disliked the fact that the performers had to follow the tape “in a kind of straitjacket” and he never returned to the piece.

      His real interest lay in developing technology capable of effecting real-time transformations of live instrumental sounds. Between 1972 and 1974 he worked on …explosante-fixe… an extended chamber piece for eight solo instruments, electronically transformed by a machine called a halophone, which effected a degree of continuity between different instrumental timbres and made the sounds travel around the concert hall. The electronic resources were still relatively primitive and he withdrew the piece. He re-used some of its material in later works, including a further piece - also called …explosante-fixe…—for MIDI-flute, ensemble and live electronics, produced at IRCAM between 1991 and 1993. By this time the technology was such that the computer could follow the score and respond to triggers from the players.

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      David Bowie (69)
      January 8, 1947 - January 10, 2016

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      Composer, Performer, Sound Innovator

      While he was always working with new sounds, such as the Stylophone as early as 1969 on the "Space Oddity" album. It was his twelfth studio album, "Heroes", released in 1977 that made its mark on, and for electronic music. The second installment of his "Berlin Trilogy" recorded with Brian Eno and Tony Visconti, "Heroes" continued the ambient experiments of Bowie's previous album Low (released earlier that year) and featured the contributions of guitarist Robert Fripp. Of the three albums, it was the only one wholly recorded in Berlin. Upon its release, it was met with positive critical reception and was named NME Album of the Year. The title track remains one of Bowie's best known and acclaimed songs.

      Bowie would continue to work with electronics and electronic artists in subsequent years embracing the drum machine filled studio sound with Nile Rogers on his hugely popular "Let's Dance" album and later would pair with Nine Inch Nails's Trent Renzor, as well as Brian Eno again, among many other contemporary artists.

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      Else Marie Pade (92)
      December 2, 1924 - January 18, 2016

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      Danish Electronic Music Composer

      Else Marie Pade was a Danish composer. She was educated as a pianist at the Kongelige Danske Musikkonservatorium (Royal Danish Academy of Music) in Copenhagen. She studied composition first with Vagn Holmboe, and later with Jan Maegaard, from whom she learned twelve-tone technique. In 1954, she became the first Danish composer of electronic and concrete music (Bruland 2001). She worked with Pierre Schaeffer and Karlheinz Stockhausen, as well as Pierre Boulez.

      After the war, she read at the Conservatory of Music, first as a pianist, but because of the after-effects of her stay in Frøslevlejren she could not do this and trained instead as a composer. In 1952 she heard a Danmarks Radio programme on Musique concrète and its creator Pierre Schaeffer. It reminded her of her own childhood conception of sounds and timbres. Via family in France, she contacted the French radio RTF and Schaeffer. She got the chance to see studies on RTF and Pierre Schaeffer had his workshop and got an appointment to get sent home material. In the same year she read Schaeffer's book À la Recherche d'une musique concrete (On the trail of concrete music).

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      Lee Abramson (46)
      September 13, 1970 - January 20, 2016

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      Composer, Musician

      Abramson used adaptive technology, live musicians and electronic technology to create complex musical expressions, all with one finger. His music featured layers of electronic textures, synthesizers, piano, bass, and percussion. His music was used as a subject for study in a Michigan State University class. Because of his disability, which limits his ability to control a computer to the use of only one finger, Abramson wrote music one note at a time using software such as Sibelius, LogicPro, ModelTalker to use computer recordings of his voice to "sing" on songs, Keystrokes from Assistiveware as an on-screen keyboard.

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      Gavin Christopher (67)
      May 1, 1949 - March 3, 2016

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      Keyboardist, Grandmaster Flash Band Member, Producer

      Following a move to New York City, Christopher signed with EMI Manhattan Records and scored his biggest single, "One Step Closer to You" (his only Hot 100 hit as an artist, #22 in 1986) and another major R&B hit two years later with "You Are Who You Love." He also produced music for artists such as Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa and The Ritchie Family, as well as mentored and worked with a young Mariah Carey prior to her getting her big break. He was heavily involved in the early hip-hop scene, writing such hits as "Girls Love the Way He Spins", "Sign of the Time", "We Gonna Rock America" and "All Night All Right".

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      Bruce Geduldig (63)
      March 7, 1953 - March 7, 2016

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      Tuxedomoon Band Member, Filmmaker

      The Tuxedomoon band had no drummer. Bassist Peter Principle, performance artist Winston Tong and Bruce Geduldig, a filmmaker, joined the band during concerts. The band created new performances for each concert, creating theatrical performances and being described as "theatrical electronic cabaret." The band performed frequently with Pere Ubu, The Residents, Devo, and Cabaret Voltaire.

      In 1979 they released the EP No Tears with the single "No Tears". The title-track is described as "one of the best electro-punk hymns of all times." That year they also signed to Ralph Records and released their debut album, Half-Mute, in 1980.

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      George Martin (90)
      January 3, 1926 - March 8, 2016

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      Composer, Producer, 5th Beatle

      Sir George Henry Martin CBE was an English record producer, arranger, composer, conductor, audio engineer and musician. He was referred to as the "Fifth Beatle", including Paul McCartney, in reference to his extensive involvement on each of the Beatles' original albums. Martin had 30 number-one hit singles in the United Kingdom and 23 number-one hits in the United States.

      Martin produced comedy and novelty records in the early 1950s, working with Peter Sellers, Spike Milligan and Bernard Cribbins, among others. His career spanned more than six decades of work in music, film, television and live performance. He held a number of senior executive roles at media companies and contributed to a wide range of charitable causes, including his work for The Prince's Trust and the Caribbean island of Montserrat. In recognition of his services to the music industry and popular culture, he was made a Knight Bachelor in 1996.

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      Keith Emerson (71)
      November 2, 1944 - March 11, 2016

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      Keyboardist, Nice, ELP

      Keith Noel Emerson was an English musician and composer. He played keyboards in a number of bands before he found his first commercial success with the Nice, formerly P. P. Arnold's backing band, in the late 1960s. He became internationally famous for his work with the Nice, which included writing rock arrangements of classical music. After leaving the Nice in 1970, he was a founding member of Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP), one of the early progressive rock super groups.

      Emerson used a variety of electronic keyboard instruments during his career, including several Hammond organs and synthesizers by Moog Music, Yamaha, and Korg. From time to time he also used other instruments such as pipe organs, a grand piano, a clavinet, and very briefly, a Mellotron. During his ELP years, Emerson toured with a large amount of gear, taking thirteen keyboard units to a December 1973 show at Madison Square Garden, and later traveling with a large Yamaha GX-1 that required eight roadies to move it. Michael "Supe" Granda of The Ozark Mountain Daredevils recalled Emerson's organ rig as being "as large as [the Daredevils'] entire stage plot

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      Phife Dawg (45)
      November 20, 1970 - March 22, 2016

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      Composer, A Tribe Called Quest Founder

      Malik Izaak Taylor, known professionally as Phife Dawg (or simply Phife), was an American rapper and a member of the group A Tribe Called Quest with high school classmates Q-Tip and Ali Shaheed Muhammad (and for a short time Jarobi White). He was also known as the "Five Foot Assassin" and "The Five Footer", because he stood at 5 feet 3 inches (1.60 m).

      Phife Dawg initially formed A Tribe Called Quest, then simply named Quest, with his high school classmate Q-Tip in 1985; the group was later expanded with the addition of Jarobi White and Ali Shaheed Muhammad. A Tribe Called Quest were closely associated with fellow hip-hop acts De La Soul and Jungle Brothers, with the groups being collectively known as the Native Tongues. A Tribe Called Quest were initially offered a demo deal by Geffen Records in 1989, but signed to Jive Records to release their 1990 debut People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm.

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      Susumu Yokota (54)
      ? - March 27, 2016

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      Musician, DJ, Experimental Ambient

      Susumu Yokota was a Japanese composer. He released several albums under pseudonyms including Stevia, Ebi, and others. Yokota was well known in the English-speaking independent music scene for his albums of experimental ambient music. However, he also had a long career as a house music DJ and released several highly regarded albums of house music.

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      Stanley Lunetta (79)
      June 5, 1937 - March 30, 2016

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      Composer, Percussionist, CMOS Innovator

      A man of many parts, Lunetta was an early adopter of digital electronics in music, created electronic sound sculptures, founded, published and edited a magazine for avant garde music and composed several works for the Sacramento Symphony. He loved science fiction and comic books, particularly Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian series.

      That author’s ideas influenced AMRA/ARMA, according to longtime friend and percussionist Ken Horton, who explained the group “was based on the idea of combining Primitive Rhythms and Digital Electronics in performances that included rituals, dance, primal rhythms, mysticism, and explosions.”

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      Tony Conrad (76)
      March 7, 1940 - April 9, 2016

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      Composer, Multi-Media Artist

      Anthony Schmalz "Tony" Conrad was an American avant-garde video artist, experimental filmmaker, musician, composer, sound artist, teacher, and writer. Active in a variety of media since the early 1960s, he was a pioneer of both structural film and drone music. He performed and collaborated with a wide range of artists over the course of his career, most prominently the 1960s New York experimental music collective Theater of Eternal Music, also known as The Dream Syndicate.

      In music, Conrad was an early member of the Theatre of Eternal Music, nicknamed The Dream Syndicate, which included John Cale, Angus MacLise, La Monte Young, and Marian Zazeela, and utilized just intonation and sustained sound (drones) to produce what the group called "dream music" (and is now called drone music).

      Conrad's first musical release, and only release for many years, was a 1972 collaboration with the German "Krautrock" group Faust, Outside the Dream Syndicate, published by Caroline (UK) in 1973. This remains his best known musical work and is considered a classic of minimalist music and drone music.

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      Richard Lyons (57)
      April 19, 1958 - April 19, 2016

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      Musican, Negativeland Founder

      Richard Lyons was an American musician, best known for being one of the founding members of the experimental music band Negativland. His personas in the band included Dick Vaughn, 5-time CalPi Award winner; auto trivia expert Dick Goodbody, and Pastor Richard Seeland, an ordained minister.

      While looking through used records in a thrift store in the mid 1980s, Lyons discovered a 1968 LP by Baptist preacher Estus Pirkle entitled If Footmen Tire You, What Will Horses Do? Lyons was intrigued by the LP and brought it to the other members of Negativland. They sampled phrases and rearranged words from Pirkle's sermon to create the song "Christianity Is Stupid" which was released on their 1987 album Escape From Noise. Another song from Escape From Noise, "Nesbitt's Lime Soda Song", was composed and sung by Lyons.

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      Prince (58)
      June 7, 1958 - April 21, 2016

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      Composer, Performer, Producer

      Prince Rogers Nelson was an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. He was a musical innovator who was known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, extravagant dress and makeup, and wide vocal range. His music integrates a wide variety of styles, including funk, rock, R&B, new wave, soul, psychedelia, and pop.

      Prince was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota and developed an interest in music as a young child. He signed a recording contract with Warner Bros. at the age of 18, and released his debut album For You in 1978. His 1979 album Prince went platinum, and his next three records—Dirty Mind (1980), Controversy (1981), and 1999 (1982)—continued his success, showcasing Prince's prominently sexual lyrics and blending of funk, dance, and rock music.

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      Isao Tomita (84)
      April 22, 1932 - May 5, 2016

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      Electronic Music Composer

      Isao Tomita often known simply as Tomita, was a Japanese music composer, regarded as one of the pioneers of electronic music and space music, and as one of the most famous producers of analog synthesizer arrangements. In addition to creating note-by-note realizations, Tomita made extensive use of the sound design capabilities of his instrument, using synthesizers to create new sounds to accompany and enhance his electronic realizations of acoustic instruments. He also made effective use of analog music sequencers and the Mellotron and featured futuristic science fiction themes, while laying the foundations for synth-pop music and trance-like rhythms. Many of his albums are electronic versions and adaptations of famous classical music pieces, and he received four Grammy Award nominations for his 1974 album Snowflakes Are Dancing.

      In his early albums, Tomita also made effective use of analog music sequencers, which he used for repeated pitch, filter or effects changes. Tomita's modular human whistle sounds would also be copied in the presets of later electronic instruments. His version of "Arabesque No. 1" was later used as the theme to the astronomy television series Jack Horkheimer: Star Gazer (originally titled Star Hustler) seen on most PBS stations; in Japan, parts of his version of "Rêverie" were used for the opening and closing of Fuji TV's transmissions; in Spain, "Arabesque No. 1" was also used for the intro and the outro for the children TV program Planeta Imaginario (imaginary planet).

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      Bernie Worrell (72)
      April 19, 1944 - June 24, 2016

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      Keyboardist, Parliament Funkadelic Band Member

      George Bernard "Bernie" Worrell, Jr. was an American keyboardist and composer best known as a founding member of Parliament-Funkadelic and for his work with Talking Heads. He is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, inducted in 1997 with fifteen other members of Parliament-Funkadelic. Worrell was described by Jon Pareles of The New York Times as "the kind of sideman who is as influential as some bandleaders."

      After meeting George Clinton, leader of a Plainfield-based doo wop group called The Parliaments, Worrell, Clinton, The Parliaments and their backing band, The Funkadelics, moved to Detroit, Michigan; thereafter, both groups became collectively known as Parliament-Funkadelic. During the 1970s the same group of musicians separately recorded under the names Parliament and Funkadelic, (among several others), but toured as P-Funk. Worrell played grand piano, Wurlitzer electric piano, Hohner Clavinet, Hammond B3 organ, ARP String Ensemble and Moog synthesizer, co-wrote, and wrote horn and rhythm arrangements on hit recordings for both groups and other associated bands under the "Parliafunkadelicment Thang" production company, and many of his most notable performances were recorded with Bootsy's Rubber Band, Parlet, The Brides of Funkenstein and The Horny Horns. Worrell recorded a 1978 solo album, All the Woo in the World, with the musical backing of P-Funk's members.

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      Alan Vega (78)
      June 23, 1938 - July 16, 2016

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      Musician, Suicide Band Member

      Boruch Alan Bermowitz, known professionally as Alan Vega, was an American vocalist and visual artist, primarily known for his work with the electronic protopunk duo Suicide.

      Seeing The Stooges perform at the New York State Pavilion in August 1969 was an epiphany for Vega. In 1970, he met and befriended Martin Reverby. Together, the two began experimenting with music and formed the band Suicide along with guitarist Paul Liebgott. The group played twice at MUSEUM before moving on to the OK Harris Gallery. Calling himself "Nasty Cut", he used the terms "Punk Music" and "Punk Music Mass" in flyers to describe their music, which he adopted from an article by Lester Bangs. In 1971 the group dropped Paul Liebgott and added Mari Reverby on drums, though she didn't play in their live performances. With Bermowitz finally settling on Alan Suicide as a working name, they began to play music venues. Suicide went on to perform at the Mercer Arts Center, Max's Kansas City, CBGB and ultimately, achieve international recognition.

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      Ray Wilson (61)
      July 14, 1955 - July 21, 2016

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      Synthesizer Designer, Music Music From Outer Space Founder, Musician, Author, Comedian

      Music From Outer Space LLC (MFOS) was founded and run by Ray Wilson with help from his family. The business started in about 2004 and incorporated in 2008. MFOS was Ray Wilson and his deep desire to keep its customers happy with innovative products, easily accessible information, reliable delivery and helpful support.

      Ray's synthesizer designs for MFOS helped people realize their analog synthesizer dreams. Check out the site for plans, schematics, PC boards, etc. Those who kove electronics, love MFOS. The site filled with projects, tips and tricks has become one of the most informative synth-diy sites on the planet.

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      James Woolley (49)
      September 26, 1966 – August 14, 2016

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      Composer, Musician, NIN Band Member

      James Joseph Woolley was an American keyboard and synthesizer player for industrial metal group Nine Inch Nails during the 1991 Lollapalooza Tour and the beginning part of the 1994 Self Destruct Tour. Woolley also appeared in the videos for "Wish" and "March of the Pigs", as well as parts of the Nine Inch Nails release Closure (1997).[citation needed] Woolley won a Grammy Award in 1993 for "Best Metal Performance" for "Wish".

      Prior to Nine Inch Nails, Woolley was a major collaborator along with former NIN drummer Chris Vrenna to Chicago band Die Warzau. In 1994, just before NIN hit the road, Woolley contributed to Sister Machine Gun's album, The Torture Technique.

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      Gilli Smyth (83)
      June 1, 1933 - August 22, 2016

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      Musician, Singer, Gong Co-Founder

      Gillian "Gilli" Mary Smyth was an English musician who performed with the bands Gong, Mother Gong, and Planet Gong and released several solo albums and albums in collaboration with other members of Gong. In Gong, she often performed under the name Shakti Yoni, contributing poems and "space whispers".

      She co-founded Gong with Allen, an outfit that included musicians such as Steve Hillage, Pierre Moerlen and Didier Malherbe. All of the songs on the albums Magick Brother and Continental Circus are listed as written or co-written by her. In her spoken-word poetry, especially within Gong's "Radio Gnome Invisible" Trilogy, she portrays a prostitute, a cat, a mother, a witch, and an old woman, and she has been known for wearing such costumes on stage. This became part of the cult mythology, which was written into sixteen albums that were produced. Gong developed into a family of bands, including Gongmaison and Mother Gong. Mother, her 1978 solo album, led to Smyth founding Mother Gong having left the original Gong band in 1975 to have children.

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      Rudy Van Gelder (92)
      November 2, 1924 - August 25, 2016

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      Recording Engineer, Producer

      Rudolph "Rudy" Van Gelder was an American recording engineer who specialized in jazz. Regarded as the most important recording engineer of jazz by some observers, Van Gelder recorded several thousand jazz sessions, including many recognized as classics, in a career which spanned more than half a century.

      Van Gelder was secretive about his recording methods, leaving fans and critics to speculate about his techniques. His recording techniques are often admired[according to whom?] for their transparency, warmth and presence. Richard Cook called Van Gelder's characteristic method of recording and mixing the piano "as distinctive as the pianists' playing" itself. Blue Note president and producer Alfred Lion criticized Van Gelder for what Lion felt was his occasional overuse of reverb, and would jokingly refer to this trait as a "Rudy special" on tape boxes.

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      Don Buchla (79)
      April 17, 1937 - September 14, 2016

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      Musician, Electronic Instrument Designer

      Donald "Don" Buchla was an American pioneer in the field of sound synthesizers, releasing his first units shortly after Robert Moog's first synthesizers.

      Buchla formed his electronic music equipment company, Buchla and Associates, in 1962 in Berkeley, California. Buchla was commissioned by composers Morton Subotnick and Ramon Sender, both of the San Francisco Tape Music Center, to create an electronic instrument for live performance. Buchla began designing his first modules for the Tape Music Center in 1963. With partial funding from a Rockefeller Foundation grant made to the Tape Music Center, Buchla assembled his modules into the Buchla Modular Electronic Music System (later known as the Series 100), which he began selling commercially in 1966. Buchla's synthesizers experimented in control interfaces, such as touch-sensitive plates. In 1969 the Series 100 was briefly sold to CBS Musical Instruments, who soon after dropped the line, not seeing the synthesizer market as a profitable area.

      1970 saw the release of the Buchla 200 series Electric Music Box, which was manufactured until 1985. Buchla created the Buchla Series 500, the first digitally controlled analog synthesizer, in 1971. Shortly after, the Buchla Series 300 was released, which combined the Series 200 with microprocessors. The Music Easel, a small, portable, all-in-one synthesizer was released in 1972. The Buchla 400, with a video display, was released in 1982. In 1987, Buchla released the fully MIDI enabled Buchla 700.

      Beginning in the 1990s, Buchla began designing alternative MIDI controllers, such as the Thunder, Lightning, and Marimba Lumina. With the recent resurgence of interest in analog synthesizers Buchla has released a revamped 200 series called the 200e.

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      Kashif Salmeem (60)
      December 26, 1956 - September 25, 2016

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      Musician, Producer, R&B Electronic Music Pioneer

      Kashif Saleem, previously Michael Jones was an American multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter, record producer, artist, composer, author, director and educator from New York City. Kashif first taught himself to play a $3 song flute at age seven and later the piano in the basement of his church. At age 15, Kashif joined B. T. Express and performed on stages around the world. He studied Islam and changed his name from Michael Jones to Kashif, which means discoverer and inventor. He crafted his own distinctive sound and later signed with Arista Records enjoying success as a solo artist.

      Together with Stevie Wonder, he was considered a pioneer in urban music thanks to his specific synthesizer technology approach and the introduction of MIDI in his production

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      Pauline Oliveros (84)
      May 30, 1932 - November 24, 2016

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      Deep Listening Pioneer, Composer, Tape Music Center Founder

      Pauline Oliveros was an American composer, accordionist and a central figure in the development of experimental and post-war electronic art music.

      She was a founding member of the San Francisco Tape Music Center in the 1960s, and served as its director. She taught music at Mills College, the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Oberlin Conservatory of Music, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Oliveros authored books, formulated new music theories, and investigated new ways to focus attention on music including her concepts of "Deep Listening" and "sonic awareness". She was an Eyebeam resident.

      In 1988, as a result of descending 14 feet into an underground cistern to make a recording, Oliveros coined the term "Deep Listening", a pun that has blossomed into "an aesthetic based upon principles of improvisation, electronic music, ritual, teaching and meditation. This aesthetic is designed to inspire both trained and untrained performers to practice the art of listening and responding to environmental conditions in solo and ensemble situations".

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      Jean-Jacques Perrey (86)
      January 20,1929 - November 4, 2016

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      Musician, Ondioline Player, Electronic Music Innovator, Producer

      Jean-Jacques Perrey was a French electronic music producer and was an early pioneer in the genre. He was a member of the electronic music duo Perrey and Kingsley.

      Perrey was born in France in 1929. He was studying medicine in Paris when he met Georges Jenny, the inventor of the Ondioline, a type of electronic keyboard. Quitting medical school, Perrey travelled through Europe demonstrating this precursor of the modern synthesizer. At the age of 30, Perrey relocated to New York, sponsored by Caroll Bratman, who built him an experimental laboratory and recording studio. Here he invented "a new process for generating rhythms with sequences and loops", utilizing the environmental sounds of "musique concrète."

      With scissors, splicing tape, and tape recorders, he spent weeks piecing together a uniquely new take on the future. Befriending Robert Moog, he became one of the first Moog synthesizer musicians, creating "far out electronic entertainment". In 1965 Perrey met Gershon Kingsley, a former colleague of John Cage. Together, using Ondioline and Perrey's loops, they created two albums for Vanguard — The In Sound From Way Out (1966) and Kaleidoscopic Vibrations (1967). Perrey and Kingsley collaborated on sound design for radio and television advertising. Perrey returned to France, composing for television, scoring for ballet, and continuing medical research into therapeutic sounds for insomniacs.

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      Greg Lake (69)
      November 10, 1947 - 7 December 7, 2016

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      Musician, Composer, ELP, King Crimson

      Gregory Stuart "Greg" Lake was an English bassist, guitarist, keyboardist, singer, songwriter, and producer who gained prominence as a founding member of the progressive rock bands King Crimson and Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP).

      Born and raised in Dorset, Lake began to play the guitar at the age of 12 and wrote his first song, "Lucky Man", at the same age. He became a full time musician at 17, playing in several rock bands until fellow Dorset guitarist Robert Fripp invited him to join King Crimson as their singer and bassist. They found commercial success with their influential debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King (1969). Lake left the band in 1970 and achieved significant success in the 1970s and beyond as the singer, guitarist, bassist, and producer of ELP. As a member of ELP, Lake wrote and recorded several popular songs including "Lucky Man" and "From the Beginning". Both songs entered the UK and US singles charts.

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      Did We Miss Someone?

      If we did, Please help us by leaving a comment and link to any import Electronic Music people who left us in 2016. We will be happy to update these reports with the information ASAP. 

       

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