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  1. Today
  2. Post-war Britain rebuilt itself on a wave of scientific and industrial breakthroughs that culminated in the cultural revolution of the 1960’s. It was a period of sweeping change and experimentation where art and culture participated in and reflected the wider social changes. In this atmosphere, a radical new group of electronic musicians utilized technology and experimentation to compose a futuristic soundtrack for the New Britain. In the early 60’s pioneering electronic musicians Tristram Cary and Peter Zinovieff established EMS (Electronic Music Studios) with wunderkind music engineer David Cockerell. EMS’s legacy is the VCS3, Britain’s first synthesizer and rival of the American Moog. The VCS3 was a uniquely British invention used by some of the most popular artists of this period including The Who, David Bowie, Brian Eno and Pink Floyd, whose iconic album Dark Side of The Moon utilized the unique sounds of the VCS3 to startling effect. The album is still one of the top selling records of all time. The individual backgrounds of the EMS characters show them as pioneering vanguards in their own right. As early as 1945 Cary hand-built the world’s largest private electronic music studio from war-surplus junk and went to lead London’s electronic avant-garde. He also moonlighted as a composer for pop cult films like The LadyKillers and the seminal television series Dr Who. Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat and fringe dwelling avant-garde composer, borrowed money from his rich British wife to buy two military grade computers specifically for his personal experiments in electronic music. With David Cockerell’s ability to make anything that Cary and Zinovieff dreamed up, EMS’s musical inventiveness opened up a world of new musical possibilities. Prime Minister Harold Wilson famously declared in 1964, ‘Britain will forge itself with the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution. As leaders of a group of machine-based musicians, EMS was the ideal sonic-architects for a society where technology was God. They created incredible sounds for films about nuclear power reactors, adverts for early Olivetti computers and for the British Pavilion at the ‘67 World Expo. Played back today this early electronic music still arouses wonder at its creation and power. The cross-pollination of swinging London’s psychedelic rock scene elite with the cardigan wearing ‘straights’ of EMS, changed the course of British rock and roll. Today in the avant-garde world of British electronica, the analog reverberations of EMS equipment and inspiration have come full circle and are being harnessed by bands like Add-N-To-X, Radiohead, and Aphex Twin. In an electronically dominated music world where one synthesizer can be preprogrammed to make any sound, these analog revivalists see the pioneering legacy of EMS as electro-genesis. What The Future Sounded Like mixes experimental visual and sonic techniques with animation and never-seen-since archival footage. A sonic and visual collage, this documentary colors in a lost chapter in music history, uncovering a group of alchemical composers and music engineers who harnessed technology and new ideas to reimagine the boundaries of music and sound. DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT - MATTHEW BATE What The Future Sounded Like is in many ways theculmination of my on-going love of electronic music.This affair began subconsciously in early childhood inthe U.K, listening on the radio to things like War Of TheWorlds, Kraftwerk’s Tour De France and watching Dr Whoon television (the sound was always much scarier thanthe papier mache monsters!). Later on I spent years insidedingy clubs listening to Detroit Techno, Chicago House andBritish Electronica. When I met Claire Harris and she told me that she knew Tristram Cary and that he lived in Adelaide we thought that he would make a great documentary subject. This was a chance to delve into the back history of a subject I thought I knew about. Whenever people talk of the beginnings of this music it usually starts with bands like Kraftwerk. But people like Tristram Cary were pioneering electronic music techniques from the late 40’s using machines hand built from war-junk. Tristram’s scores are monolithic soundscapes, grating and beautiful and unlike anything I’d ever heard before. He also scored for Dr Who and films like the Ladykillers and Hammer Horror films. Thus our project began as a bio-pic about Tristram before morphing into a story about the Electronic Music Studios (EMS). The story of EMS is truly amazing. In the mid 60’s Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat, bought a computer which, at the time only the military and large factories had access to. But Peter didn’t want to launch rockets or control food processing; he wanted to change the boundaries of how to make music. From the late 50’s Peter and Tristram led a vanguard of avant-garde electronic music makers who sought to re-define what music could be. One of the most intriguing ideas for the film is that these artists were making music and sounds which had never been heard before, using equipment which was either hand built or appropriated from cutting edge scientific hardware. What a beautiful idea that such an alchemical process should be used to make music. Together with Tristram and genius-engineer David Cockerell, Peter Zinovieff established EMS one of the first computer music facilities in the world. They pioneered techniques now taken for granted such as digital sequencing, sampling and analysing. Prime Minister Harold Wilson declared in 1964 that England would be ‘forged in the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution’. This idea forms another key to our story; that EMS was breaking new artistic ground with the science and technology of music, and in a way provided a futuristic sound-track for the New Britain. When they needed more money to fund their ideas EMS invented England’s first synthesizer, the VCS3, which coincidentally changed the sound palette available to mainstream rock bands in the late 60’s. Suddenly iconic bands like Pink Floyd and Roxy Music were turned on to electronic music through a crosspollination with the avant-garde EMS. Today bands like Radiohead and Aphex Twin are still using this EMS gear. This was another seductive idea in telling this story, that these fringe-dwelling avant-garde musicians had influenced the sounds of iconic albums like Dark Side of The Moon and the glam rock of Roxy Music! View full movie
  3. What the Future Sounded Like

    Post-war Britain rebuilt itself on a wave of scientific and industrial breakthroughs that culminated in the cultural revolution of the 1960’s. It was a period of sweeping change and experimentation where art and culture participated in and reflected the wider social changes. In this atmosphere, a radical new group of electronic musicians utilized technology and experimentation to compose a futuristic soundtrack for the New Britain. In the early 60’s pioneering electronic musicians Tristram Cary and Peter Zinovieff established EMS (Electronic Music Studios) with wunderkind music engineer David Cockerell. EMS’s legacy is the VCS3, Britain’s first synthesizer and rival of the American Moog. The VCS3 was a uniquely British invention used by some of the most popular artists of this period including The Who, David Bowie, Brian Eno and Pink Floyd, whose iconic album Dark Side of The Moon utilized the unique sounds of the VCS3 to startling effect. The album is still one of the top selling records of all time. The individual backgrounds of the EMS characters show them as pioneering vanguards in their own right. As early as 1945 Cary hand-built the world’s largest private electronic music studio from war-surplus junk and went to lead London’s electronic avant-garde. He also moonlighted as a composer for pop cult films like The LadyKillers and the seminal television series Dr Who. Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat and fringe dwelling avant-garde composer, borrowed money from his rich British wife to buy two military grade computers specifically for his personal experiments in electronic music. With David Cockerell’s ability to make anything that Cary and Zinovieff dreamed up, EMS’s musical inventiveness opened up a world of new musical possibilities. Prime Minister Harold Wilson famously declared in 1964, ‘Britain will forge itself with the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution. As leaders of a group of machine-based musicians, EMS was the ideal sonic-architects for a society where technology was God. They created incredible sounds for films about nuclear power reactors, adverts for early Olivetti computers and for the British Pavilion at the ‘67 World Expo. Played back today this early electronic music still arouses wonder at its creation and power. The cross-pollination of swinging London’s psychedelic rock scene elite with the cardigan wearing ‘straights’ of EMS, changed the course of British rock and roll. Today in the avant-garde world of British electronica, the analog reverberations of EMS equipment and inspiration have come full circle and are being harnessed by bands like Add-N-To-X, Radiohead, and Aphex Twin. In an electronically dominated music world where one synthesizer can be preprogrammed to make any sound, these analog revivalists see the pioneering legacy of EMS as electro-genesis. What The Future Sounded Like mixes experimental visual and sonic techniques with animation and never-seen-since archival footage. A sonic and visual collage, this documentary colors in a lost chapter in music history, uncovering a group of alchemical composers and music engineers who harnessed technology and new ideas to reimagine the boundaries of music and sound. DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT - MATTHEW BATE What The Future Sounded Like is in many ways theculmination of my on-going love of electronic music.This affair began subconsciously in early childhood inthe U.K, listening on the radio to things like War Of TheWorlds, Kraftwerk’s Tour De France and watching Dr Whoon television (the sound was always much scarier thanthe papier mache monsters!). Later on I spent years insidedingy clubs listening to Detroit Techno, Chicago House andBritish Electronica. When I met Claire Harris and she told me that she knew Tristram Cary and that he lived in Adelaide we thought that he would make a great documentary subject. This was a chance to delve into the back history of a subject I thought I knew about. Whenever people talk of the beginnings of this music it usually starts with bands like Kraftwerk. But people like Tristram Cary were pioneering electronic music techniques from the late 40’s using machines hand built from war-junk. Tristram’s scores are monolithic soundscapes, grating and beautiful and unlike anything I’d ever heard before. He also scored for Dr Who and films like the Ladykillers and Hammer Horror films. Thus our project began as a bio-pic about Tristram before morphing into a story about the Electronic Music Studios (EMS). The story of EMS is truly amazing. In the mid 60’s Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat, bought a computer which, at the time only the military and large factories had access to. But Peter didn’t want to launch rockets or control food processing; he wanted to change the boundaries of how to make music. From the late 50’s Peter and Tristram led a vanguard of avant-garde electronic music makers who sought to re-define what music could be. One of the most intriguing ideas for the film is that these artists were making music and sounds which had never been heard before, using equipment which was either hand built or appropriated from cutting edge scientific hardware. What a beautiful idea that such an alchemical process should be used to make music. Together with Tristram and genius-engineer David Cockerell, Peter Zinovieff established EMS one of the first computer music facilities in the world. They pioneered techniques now taken for granted such as digital sequencing, sampling and analysing. Prime Minister Harold Wilson declared in 1964 that England would be ‘forged in the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution’. This idea forms another key to our story; that EMS was breaking new artistic ground with the science and technology of music, and in a way provided a futuristic sound-track for the New Britain. When they needed more money to fund their ideas EMS invented England’s first synthesizer, the VCS3, which coincidentally changed the sound palette available to mainstream rock bands in the late 60’s. Suddenly iconic bands like Pink Floyd and Roxy Music were turned on to electronic music through a crosspollination with the avant-garde EMS. Today bands like Radiohead and Aphex Twin are still using this EMS gear. This was another seductive idea in telling this story, that these fringe-dwelling avant-garde musicians had influenced the sounds of iconic albums like Dark Side of The Moon and the glam rock of Roxy Music!
  4. The Alchemists of Sound

    A documentary about the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, responsible for creating some of the most memorable television and radio music in British popular culture, including "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" and Doctor Who (1963). The BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop was set up in 1958, born out of a desire to create ‘new kinds of sounds’. The Alchemists of Sound looks at this creative group from its inception, through its golden age when it was supplying music and effects for cult classics like Doctor Who, Blake’s Seven and Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, and charts its fading away in 1995 when, due to budget cuts, it was no longer able to survive. There are interviews with composers from the Workshop, as well as musicians and writers who have been inspired by the output. Great archive footage of the Workshop and its machinery is accompanied by excerpts of the, now cult, TV programs that featured these sounds. View full movie
  5. The Alchemists of Sound

    A documentary about the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, responsible for creating some of the most memorable television and radio music in British popular culture, including "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" and Doctor Who (1963). The BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop was set up in 1958, born out of a desire to create ‘new kinds of sounds’. The Alchemists of Sound looks at this creative group from its inception, through its golden age when it was supplying music and effects for cult classics like Doctor Who, Blake’s Seven and Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, and charts its fading away in 1995 when, due to budget cuts, it was no longer able to survive. There are interviews with composers from the Workshop, as well as musicians and writers who have been inspired by the output. Great archive footage of the Workshop and its machinery is accompanied by excerpts of the, now cult, TV programs that featured these sounds.
  6. New Sound of Music

    The New Sound of Music is a fascinating BBC historical documentary from the year 1979. It charts the development of recorded music from the first barrel organs, pianolas, the phonograph, the magnetic tape recorder and onto the concepts of musique concrete and electronic music development with voltage-controlled oscillators making up the analog synthesizers of the day. EMS Synthesizers and equipment are a heavily featured technology resource in this film, with the show's host, Michael Rodd, demonstrating the EMS VCS3 synthesizer and it's waveform output. Other EMS products include the incredible Synthi 100 modular console system, the EMS AKS, the Poly Synthi and the EMS Vocoder. Most of the location shots are filmed within the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop studios as they were in 1979. Malcolm Clarke demonstrates the Synthi 100, also known as the "Delaware", Michael Rodd demonstrates musique concrete by tape splicing and manipulation and Paddy Kingsland demonstrates tape recorder delay techniques (also known as "Frippertronics"). The Yamaha CS-80 analog synthesizer is demonstrated by both Peter Howell and Roger Limb. The EMS Vocoder is also expertly put to use by Peter Howell on his classic "Greenwich Chorus" for the television series "The Body in Question". Dick Mills works on sound effects for Doctor Who using a VCS3 unit, and Elizabeth Parker uses bubble sounds to create music for an academic film on particle physics. Peter Zinovieff is featured using his computer music studio and DEC PDP8 computer to produce electronic variations on classic vintage scores. David Vorhaus is featured using his invention, the MANIAC (Multiphasic ANalog Inter-Active Chromataphonic (sequencer)), and playing his other invention, the Kaleidophon -- which uses lengths of magnetic tape as velocity-sensitive ribbon controllers. The New Sound of Music is a fascinating insight into the birth of the world of recorded and electronic music and features some very classic British analog synthesizers creating the electronic sounds in this film. The prime location for these demonstrations is the BBC Radiophonic Workshop where much creativity and invention took place during the period the workshop was in operation in the latter part of the twentieth century. Electronic music today is used everywhere, and many musicians gain inspiration from the past, as well as delving into the realms of sonic structures and theories made possible by the widespread use of computers to manipulate sounds for the creation of all kinds of musical forms. View full movie
  7. New Sound of Music

    The New Sound of Music is a fascinating BBC historical documentary from the year 1979. It charts the development of recorded music from the first barrel organs, pianolas, the phonograph, the magnetic tape recorder and onto the concepts of musique concrete and electronic music development with voltage-controlled oscillators making up the analog synthesizers of the day. EMS Synthesizers and equipment are a heavily featured technology resource in this film, with the show's host, Michael Rodd, demonstrating the EMS VCS3 synthesizer and it's waveform output. Other EMS products include the incredible Synthi 100 modular console system, the EMS AKS, the Poly Synthi and the EMS Vocoder. Most of the location shots are filmed within the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop studios as they were in 1979. Malcolm Clarke demonstrates the Synthi 100, also known as the "Delaware", Michael Rodd demonstrates musique concrete by tape splicing and manipulation and Paddy Kingsland demonstrates tape recorder delay techniques (also known as "Frippertronics"). The Yamaha CS-80 analog synthesizer is demonstrated by both Peter Howell and Roger Limb. The EMS Vocoder is also expertly put to use by Peter Howell on his classic "Greenwich Chorus" for the television series "The Body in Question". Dick Mills works on sound effects for Doctor Who using a VCS3 unit, and Elizabeth Parker uses bubble sounds to create music for an academic film on particle physics. Peter Zinovieff is featured using his computer music studio and DEC PDP8 computer to produce electronic variations on classic vintage scores. David Vorhaus is featured using his invention, the MANIAC (Multiphasic ANalog Inter-Active Chromataphonic (sequencer)), and playing his other invention, the Kaleidophon -- which uses lengths of magnetic tape as velocity-sensitive ribbon controllers. The New Sound of Music is a fascinating insight into the birth of the world of recorded and electronic music and features some very classic British analog synthesizers creating the electronic sounds in this film. The prime location for these demonstrations is the BBC Radiophonic Workshop where much creativity and invention took place during the period the workshop was in operation in the latter part of the twentieth century. Electronic music today is used everywhere, and many musicians gain inspiration from the past, as well as delving into the realms of sonic structures and theories made possible by the widespread use of computers to manipulate sounds for the creation of all kinds of musical forms.
  8. Yesterday
  9. Last week
  10. Electronic music without any instruments like synthesizers, samplers, guitars... just the virtual oscillators of a program. This was the approach for "A Passage Through Time" from the year 2012 created by experimental musician Christian Fiesel. Beyond this album was a loss, during the creation of the album, the mother of the artist declined mentally and died after release. So "A Passage Through Time" is an emotional journey through the tides of life by the means of electronic soundscapes. The music meanders between drone, dark ambient and ambient.
  11. Glitch is a film about circuit bending. Made by Myself and a small crew, featuring circuit bending talent from up and down the country. When I started this project I wanted to incorporate video bending into the film. I had no way to do this and found no one who could help me to do it before the deadline. For some reason one of my capture files corrupted... Not only did it corrupt but it mixed itself with footage from a previous shoot, so I incorporated it into the film. View full movie
  12. Glitch is a film about circuit bending. Made by Myself and a small crew, featuring circuit bending talent from up and down the country. When I started this project I wanted to incorporate video bending into the film. I had no way to do this and found no one who could help me to do it before the deadline. For some reason one of my capture files corrupted... Not only did it corrupt but it mixed itself with footage from a previous shoot, so I incorporated it into the film.
  13. Synth Britannia

    Documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesizer from the experimental fringes to the center of the pop stage. In the late 1970s, small pockets of electronic artists including the Human League, Daniel Miller and Cabaret Volatire were inspired by Kraftwerk and JG Ballard, and they dreamt of the sound of the future against the backdrop of bleak, high-rise Britain. The crossover moment came in 1979 when Gary Numan's appearance on Top of the Pops with Tubeway Army's Are 'Friends' Electric? heralded the arrival of synthpop. Four lads from Basildon known as Depeche Mode would come to own the new sound, whilst post-punk bands like Ultravox, Soft Cell, OMD and Yazoo took the synth out of the pages of NME and onto the front page of Smash Hits. By 1983, acts like Pet Shop Boys and New Order were showing that the future of electronic music would lie in dance music. Contributors include Philip Oakey, Vince Clarke, Martin Gore, Bernard Sumner, Gary Numan and Neil Tennant. View full movie
  14. Synth Britannia

    Documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesizer from the experimental fringes to the center of the pop stage. In the late 1970s, small pockets of electronic artists including the Human League, Daniel Miller and Cabaret Volatire were inspired by Kraftwerk and JG Ballard, and they dreamt of the sound of the future against the backdrop of bleak, high-rise Britain. The crossover moment came in 1979 when Gary Numan's appearance on Top of the Pops with Tubeway Army's Are 'Friends' Electric? heralded the arrival of synthpop. Four lads from Basildon known as Depeche Mode would come to own the new sound, whilst post-punk bands like Ultravox, Soft Cell, OMD and Yazoo took the synth out of the pages of NME and onto the front page of Smash Hits. By 1983, acts like Pet Shop Boys and New Order were showing that the future of electronic music would lie in dance music. Contributors include Philip Oakey, Vince Clarke, Martin Gore, Bernard Sumner, Gary Numan and Neil Tennant.
  15. The SL1 Synthlab uses a 100% true analog circuitry with subtractive synthesis which is designed in a classic way. This type of design started in the early 1970´s with voltage-controlled modular systems. The use of the low pass filter based on the transistor cascade means the SL-1 Synthlab sounds very similar to well-known early Moog synthesizers. View full synthesizer
  16. The SL1 Synthlab uses a 100% true analog circuitry with subtractive synthesis which is designed in a classic way. This type of design started in the early 1970´s with voltage-controlled modular systems. The use of the low pass filter based on the transistor cascade means the SL-1 Synthlab sounds very similar to well-known early Moog synthesizers. The SL-1 has a built-in MIDI interface so you will find it easy to integrate into any MIDI studio setup. The Synthlab also has a built-in MIDI-TO-CV/GATE interface which is very handy when using vintage equipment. The SL-1 is a hand-made, true discrete analogue synthesizer built in Germany. Components from the 1970’s thru 1980’s were used, but also modern technology was employed. There are no DSP´s, so the sound is true, pure and very experimental like a small synthesizer laboratory – hence the name: SL-1 Synthlab. The setup of the SL-1 makes it very easy to use if you have played around with other analog synthesizers. Every parameter has its own pot for controlling and playing with the modulation and everything can be controlled manually in real-time. The controls of the modules are divided into groups on the front panel so they can be visually seperated for easier use. For basic setup you have 2 VCO´s and an external audio input. The selected signal can be routed through the VCF and VCA before it reaches the audio output. Each VCF and VCA has its own envelope generator. Additionally, you have various modulation routing possibilities through the LFO´s.
  17. Stalker (Russian: Сталкер) is a 1979 Soviet science fiction art film directed by Andrei Tarkovsky with a screenplay written by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Loosely based on their novel Roadside Picnic (1972), the film combines elements from the science fiction genre with dramatic philosophical and psychological themes. It depicts an expedition led by a figure known as the "Stalker" (Aleksandr Kaidanovsky) to take his two clients, a melancholic writer (Anatoli Solonitsyn) seeking inspiration and a professor (Nikolai Grinko) seeking scientific discovery, to a mysterious restricted site known simply as the "Zone," where there is a room which is supposed to have the ability to fulfill a person's innermost desires. The trio travel through unnerving areas filled with the debris of modern society while engaging in many arguments. The "Zone" itself appears sentient, while their path through it can be sensed but not seen. In the film, a stalker is a professional guide to the Zone, someone having the ability and desire to cross the border into the dangerous and forbidden place with a specific goal. The Stalker film score was composed by Eduard Artemyev, who had also composed the scores for Tarkovsky's previous films Solaris and The Mirror. For Stalker, Artemyev composed and recorded two different versions of the score. The first score was done with an orchestra alone but was rejected by Tarkovsky. The second score that was used in the final film was created on a synthesizer along with traditional instruments that were manipulated using sound effects. In the final film score, the boundaries between music and sound were blurred, as natural sounds and music interact to the point where they are indistinguishable. In fact, many of the natural sounds were not production sounds but were created by Artemyev on his synthesizer. For Tarkovsky music was more than just a parallel illustration of the visual image. He believed that music distorts and changes the emotional tone of a visual image while not changing the meaning. He also believed that in a film with complete theoretical consistency music will have no place and that instead of music is replaced by sounds. According to Tarkovsky, he aimed at this consistency and moved into this direction in Stalker and Nostalghia. In addition to the original monophonic soundtrack, the Russian Cinema Council (Ruscico) created an alternative 5.1 surround sound track for the 2001 DVD release. In addition to remixing the mono soundtrack, music and sound effects were removed and added in several scenes. Music was added to the scene where the three are traveling to the zone on a motorized draisine. In the opening and the final scene Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was removed and in the opening scene in Stalker's house, ambient sounds were added, changing the original soundtrack, in which this scene was completely silent except for the sound of a train. View full movie
  18. Stalker (Russian: Сталкер) is a 1979 Soviet science fiction art film directed by Andrei Tarkovsky with a screenplay written by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky. Loosely based on their novel Roadside Picnic (1972), the film combines elements from the science fiction genre with dramatic philosophical and psychological themes. It depicts an expedition led by a figure known as the "Stalker" (Aleksandr Kaidanovsky) to take his two clients, a melancholic writer (Anatoli Solonitsyn) seeking inspiration and a professor (Nikolai Grinko) seeking scientific discovery, to a mysterious restricted site known simply as the "Zone," where there is a room which is supposed to have the ability to fulfill a person's innermost desires. The trio travel through unnerving areas filled with the debris of modern society while engaging in many arguments. The "Zone" itself appears sentient, while their path through it can be sensed but not seen. In the film, a stalker is a professional guide to the Zone, someone having the ability and desire to cross the border into the dangerous and forbidden place with a specific goal. The Stalker film score was composed by Eduard Artemyev, who had also composed the scores for Tarkovsky's previous films Solaris and The Mirror. For Stalker, Artemyev composed and recorded two different versions of the score. The first score was done with an orchestra alone but was rejected by Tarkovsky. The second score that was used in the final film was created on a synthesizer along with traditional instruments that were manipulated using sound effects. In the final film score, the boundaries between music and sound were blurred, as natural sounds and music interact to the point where they are indistinguishable. In fact, many of the natural sounds were not production sounds but were created by Artemyev on his synthesizer. For Tarkovsky music was more than just a parallel illustration of the visual image. He believed that music distorts and changes the emotional tone of a visual image while not changing the meaning. He also believed that in a film with complete theoretical consistency music will have no place and that instead of music is replaced by sounds. According to Tarkovsky, he aimed at this consistency and moved into this direction in Stalker and Nostalghia. In addition to the original monophonic soundtrack, the Russian Cinema Council (Ruscico) created an alternative 5.1 surround sound track for the 2001 DVD release. In addition to remixing the mono soundtrack, music and sound effects were removed and added in several scenes. Music was added to the scene where the three are traveling to the zone on a motorized draisine. In the opening and the final scene Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was removed and in the opening scene in Stalker's house, ambient sounds were added, changing the original soundtrack, in which this scene was completely silent except for the sound of a train.
  19. If you watched TV, went to the movies, or listened to the radio in the 80s and 90s, you probably heard Suzanne Ciani's work, whether you knew it or not. Suzanne is a five-time Grammy nominated composer, electronic music pioneer, and neo-classical recording artist whose work has been featured in countless commercials, video games, and feature films. "A Life in Waves" explores Suzanne's life and innovations through her own eyes, offering a feminine glimpse into the world of electronic music. From her earliest days learning the piano, to her multi-million dollar advertising ventures, to her successes in the world of New Age music, to her recent re-connection with her beloved Buchla synthesizer, the film is a journey into Suzanne's mind, offering a feminine glimpse into the often complicated world of electronic music. View full movie
  20. If you watched TV, went to the movies, or listened to the radio in the 80s and 90s, you probably heard Suzanne Ciani's work, whether you knew it or not. Suzanne is a five-time Grammy nominated composer, electronic music pioneer, and neo-classical recording artist whose work has been featured in countless commercials, video games, and feature films. "A Life in Waves" explores Suzanne's life and innovations through her own eyes, offering a feminine glimpse into the world of electronic music. From her earliest days learning the piano, to her multi-million dollar advertising ventures, to her successes in the world of New Age music, to her recent re-connection with her beloved Buchla synthesizer, the film is a journey into Suzanne's mind, offering a feminine glimpse into the often complicated world of electronic music.
  21. The SH-01A is a meticulous reproduction of the iconic Roland SH-101, one of the most popular classic synthesizers of all time. Our Analog Circuit Behavior (ACB) technology reproduces the SH-101’s legendary sounds by faithfully recreating the actual behavior of the original analog circuits, right down to the fine details and odd quirks that have endeared the synth to musicians and producers for decades. The SH-01A builds on the great sounds and creative immediacy of the original, now in the popular Roland Boutique format—offering exciting new polyphonic capabilities, inspiring new performance features, and a level of authenticity that could only come from Roland. View full synthesizer
  22. Roland SH-01A Boutique Synthesizer

    The SH-01A is a meticulous reproduction of the iconic Roland SH-101, one of the most popular classic synthesizers of all time. Our Analog Circuit Behavior (ACB) technology reproduces the SH-101’s legendary sounds by faithfully recreating the actual behavior of the original analog circuits, right down to the fine details and odd quirks that have endeared the synth to musicians and producers for decades. The SH-01A builds on the great sounds and creative immediacy of the original, now in the popular Roland Boutique format—offering exciting new polyphonic capabilities, inspiring new performance features, and a level of authenticity that could only come from Roland. Beauty Through Simplicity The now-legendary SH-101 was a seemingly simple monophonic synthesizer launched in 1982. Unlike more complex synthesizers available at the time, the SH-101 quickly became popular for its characteristic tone and simple one-VCO → one-VCF → one-VCA → one-LFO structure. A legion of artists found it quick to program and adept at bright edgy tones and exciting sound effects. Its bass sounds are universally revered, and somehow any sound it produces always just fits perfectly in a mix. More than thirty years later, the SH-101’s hallmark sounds continue to be sought after by electronic artists the world over. It’s a staple of vintage synth collectors and well-equipped, world-class studios, and now returns as the inspiration for the SH-01A. A is for Authentic Original SH-101s are becoming increasingly rare, making them ever more expensive on the used market. Because of this, many have resorted to sample packs, hardware knockoffs, or software plug-ins loosely inspired by the SH-101. The SH-01A accurately recreates what makes the original so special, and the interface, while more compact, is 100% authentic. The sound is vibrant and alive thanks to our proprietary Analog Circuit Behavior (ACB) technology. We use ACB to carefully recreate all the details and quirks of the original hardware by modeling each analog circuit, right down to the component level. Face-to-face consultation with the original designers and relentless research beyond the original schematics provides meticulously recreated oscillator, filter, and envelope behavior—a perfect foundation to build upon for a new generation of “101” fans. An Inspired, Iconic Sequencer Revisited One of the most creative features of the original SH-101 was its 100-note step sequencer. Press Load, add sequential notes with legato and rests, and press Play. Easy. Designed to inspire through simplicity, the SH-101 sequencer has been the source of countless bass lines and lead melodies on legendary dance tracks. But the limitation of playing one sequence back at a time has been resolved with the SH-01A. Now you can save and access 64 sequence patterns, perfect for any performance situation. Recall any pattern at any time, and use the iconic sequencer to control your modular rig, hardware synthesizers, and software plugins via CV/Gate, MIDI, and USB. Let the SH-01A be the heart of your electronic instrument setup, on stage or in the studio. Did You Say Polyphonic? The SH-101 found its power in a huge monophonic voice for a wide variety of sounds. The SH-01A now has four huge voices, allowing for more modes to expand upon the original’s sound palette. On top of the classic Mono mode, you can stack the four voices in Unison mode to add some punch to your bass and lead lines. Chord mode layers any four notes, and can be shifted up and down in semi-tone intervals. Poly mode allows for four notes to be played simultaneously, making the famous monosynth now capable of pads and chords. Portable. Performer. The simple design of the SH-101 made patch creation immediate, with sounds quickly forming under the movement of each key and slider. But that inspiring sound could vanish as quickly as it appeared due to its lack of patch memory. The SH-01A adds 64 writeable patches that can serve as presets for different tracks or quick starting points for experimenting with new sound designs, making inspiration only a button press away. The SH-01A takes the original SH-101’s portability and stage prowess to a whole new level. It’s small enough to take just about anywhere, yet ruggedly built with sturdy knobs, metal-shaft sliders, and solid silver buttons like the original. It has several tilt options for easy viewing in various live and studio scenarios, and can serve as a low-latency, portable audio interface. In addition, it has a built-in speaker, and even runs on batteries. And when mounted in the optional K-25m Keyboard Unit, it can be used as a compact, all-in-one synth with 25 velocity-sensitive keys. With all this power and flexibility, you may be most surprised by the SH-01A’s affordable price, which puts the iconic SH-101 mojo within reach of just about anyone.
  23. Topic: Roland TR-08 Rhythm Composer

    The TR-08 is an obsessively detailed and faithful replica of the legendary TR-808—easily the most famous and influential drum machine ever made. After creating a monumental shift in the sound of music, the “808” has continued to shape and define entire genres. Beloved by musicians and producers the world over, it’s one of the most revered and sought-after electronic musical instruments of all time. The TR-08 brings the look, sound, and feel of the original 808—with stunning accuracy—to the Roland Boutique format. It blends attention to detail and respect for legacy with modern convenience and reliability. View full drum machine
  24. Roland TR-08 Rhythm Composer

    The TR-08 is an obsessively detailed and faithful replica of the legendary TR-808—easily the most famous and influential drum machine ever made. After creating a monumental shift in the sound of music, the “808” has continued to shape and define entire genres. Beloved by musicians and producers the world over, it’s one of the most revered and sought-after electronic musical instruments of all time. The TR-08 brings the look, sound, and feel of the original 808—with stunning accuracy—to the Roland Boutique format. It blends attention to detail and respect for legacy with modern convenience and reliability. The Boom in the Room The TR-808 arrived in 1980 to an unsuspecting and somewhat bewildered public. To many at the time, its purely analog sound and range of tweakable parameters didn’t exactly deliver “traditional” drum sounds. It wasn’t until adventurous musicians and producers got their hands on the TR-808 and started tweaking those knobs that the world would fully realize the sonic impact it would leave on music forever. For the next three decades, the sizzling hi-hats and snappy snare, the robotic, clicky rim shot, the unmistakable cowbell, and yes, that booming bass drum, would be heard on many thousands of tracks. Worldwide hits, underground classic, and entire genres were spawned. Its influence is so deep that it’s been name-dropped in famous tracks, had albums dedicated to it and bands named after it, and even been the subject of a feature-length documentary film. A New Generation of 808 Time has not diminished the TR-808’s influence. New genres continue to make use of the 808, with some utilizing it as the main instrument and defining sound of the style. Sure, you can use samples of a TR-808, but there’s nothing quite like the real thing. The 808’s user interface with its buttons, knobs, and switches, and the odd quirks of how the sounds interact with each other—they’re all vitally important to conjuring up that real 808 mojo. And you know it when you hear it. The new TR-08 adds some thoughtful and modern touches to the classic formula. The sequencer has 16 sub-steps per step, so you can create detailed snare fills and intricate, rolling hi-hats. It also has a track-selectable trigger out for working with other instruments like the TB-03, SH-01A, or modular gear. An unobtrusive LED display provides finer control of tempo and shuffle. You can step-program or tap in your parts in real-time without stopping to change modes. Everything sends and receives MIDI control messages and it even supports audio and MIDI over USB. Portable. Affordable. Authentic. Original TR-808s are big and heavy, and their rarity makes them extremely expensive and sought-after on the used market. Because of this, many have resorted to 808 sample packs or hardware knockoffs. But there’s something about the colors and controls and, of course, the sound of a genuine TR-808 that brings home the sound of so many classic tracks. The TR-08 accurately recreates the ingredients that make an 808 so special. The interface, while miniaturized, is 100% authentic. The sound is vibrant and alive thanks to our proprietary Analog Circuit Behavior (ACB) technology. We use ACB to carefully recreate all the details and quirks of the original hardware by modeling each analog circuit, right down to the component level. Not only does the TR-08 look and sound the part, but it also has some modern features and conveniences. With all this beat-making power, it would be a shame to keep it shackled to the studio. After all, inspiration can strike anywhere, and drum machines are fun to play live. The TR-08 is literally small enough to take just about anywhere. It’s ruggedly built with sturdy knobs, buttons, and switches. It has several tilt options for easy viewing in various live and studio scenarios. It can be a low-latency, portable audio interface. It has a built-in speaker, and even runs on batteries for when the beat absolutely must go on. With all this power and flexibility, you may be most surprised by the TR-08’s affordable price, which puts the legendary 808 vibe within reach of just about anyone who’s ever dreamed of owning the iconic original.
  25. Korg Kronos 61 Music Workstation

    The deepest synth I ever worked with. It gives me so many ideas. This is more than a Workstation. It is a dream machine.
  26. Tony Conrad: Completely in the Present is a non-fiction film examining the pioneering life and works of artist, musician, and educator, Tony Conrad. Tony Conrad was one the great American artists of our time, yet to the world at large he remains criminally under appreciated. Since the early 1960s, Conrad's films and compositions have been the stuff of legend for artists and musicians everywhere. His vast, inter-disciplinary repertoire has single-handedly created and influenced major film and compositional movements. He performed in and recorded the soundtrack to Jack Smith’s legendary Flaming Creatures; he turned the paradigms of cinema upside down with The Flicker, a film composed of only black and white frames; his development and practice of Just Intonation and Minimalism through his work with Stockhausen and La Monte Young still has the music establishment scratching their heads; his pivotal role in the formation of The Velvet Underground has directly or indirectly influenced everyone who has picked up a guitar since; as an early adopter of activist public access television he democratized the emerging medium of portable video. In his later years he continued to perform and make work that pushed the boundaries of reason for which he has finally begun to receive worldwide attention. Utilizing intimate footage of Tony and his collaborators shot over the last twenty-two years, as well as his own archive of recordings and films, Tony Conrad: Completely in the Present mirrors Conrad’s own playfully radical approach to art making. The non-linear structure allows Conrad to wildly free associate his streams of consciousness, revealing an honest and humane way of navigating a remarkable, creative life.
  27. Tony Conrad: Completely in the Present is a non-fiction film examining the pioneering life and works of artist, musician, and educator, Tony Conrad. Tony Conrad was one the great American artists of our time, yet to the world at large he remains criminally under appreciated. Since the early 1960s, Conrad's films and compositions have been the stuff of legend for artists and musicians everywhere. His vast, inter-disciplinary repertoire has single-handedly created and influenced major film and compositional movements. He performed in and recorded the soundtrack to Jack Smith’s legendary Flaming Creatures; he turned the paradigms of cinema upside down with The Flicker, a film composed of only black and white frames; his development and practice of Just Intonation and Minimalism through his work with Stockhausen and La Monte Young still has the music establishment scratching their heads; his pivotal role in the formation of The Velvet Underground has directly or indirectly influenced everyone who has picked up a guitar since; as an early adopter of activist public access television he democratized the emerging medium of portable video. In his later years he continued to perform and make work that pushed the boundaries of reason for which he has finally begun to receive worldwide attention. Utilizing intimate footage of Tony and his collaborators shot over the last twenty-two years, as well as his own archive of recordings and films, Tony Conrad: Completely in the Present mirrors Conrad’s own playfully radical approach to art making. The non-linear structure allows Conrad to wildly free associate his streams of consciousness, revealing an honest and humane way of navigating a remarkable, creative life. View full movie
  28. Earlier
  29. Yamaha TX802 FM Tone Generator

    The TX802 is a nice unit for loading traditional DX7 sounds and so forth. Because it doesn't have the Unison modes and a few other parameters found on the Mk II synths. Not all patches will sound the same on the TX802 as they do on your DX7.
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  • Recent Status Updates

    • Jack Hertz

      Wait for the little creatures to come out...
       
      · 2 replies
    • Mystified

       
      From the debut release of Model 201, a musical act by Thomas Park that only uses sounds extracted from old analog cassettes as source material. Get the audio here: https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/series-1-model-201
      · 0 replies
    • CIIIGoff

      George Orwell Meets 2017's USA
      Ride The Train Of  Dissonance To "Untopia"
      Our hero, Glarmen Glamours, takes on today's Big Brother with sound collage and dramatic electro-acoustical vigor.  
      Curious?  Click the Pic Below and Go:
      Untopia

       
      The first review is already in (quote Gerbil Bliss...)
      The perfect soundtrack to Washington crazy.  Tired of trying to apply logic to the sh*t going down in our federal and state governments? Here's a soundtrack of a response. The Universe help us all! Enjoy while we still have an open Title II regulated Internet.
       
      · 1 reply
    • Mystified

      Here are some samples I have collected and/or created, which I offer for free. Most are cc-licensed, for use with attribution.
      Enjoy, and remember please to attribute (give credit).
      Spoken Word Samples:
      https://archive.org/details/SpokenWordSamples
      Tape Loops:
      https://archive.org/details/ThomasParkTapeLoops
      Shortwave Radio Outtakes:
      https://archive.org/details/HighFidelityShortwaveOuttakes
      Machine Sounds Outtakes:
      https://archive.org/details/MachinesOnMachinesSamples
      Shortwave Radio Sounds:
      https://archive.org/details/ShortwaveRadioInHighFidelity
      Machine Sounds:
      https://archive.org/details/MachinesByContactMicrophone
      Various Early Sound Experiments For Free Use:
      https://archive.org/details/mystified_Amalgam
      Urban Industrial Sounds Outtakes:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/urban-elements
      Urban Field Recordings:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/south-city-sounds
      Sferics Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sferics-samples
      Shortwave Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/shortwave-samples
      Fractal Noise Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/eclectic-noise-samples
      Space Sounds Outtakes:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/nasa-outtakes-sample-pack
      Urban Industrial Sounds Outtakes:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sounds-for-urban-discourse-part-2
      Urban Industrial Sounds Outtakes:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sounds-for-urban-discourse
      Treated Field Recordings:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/treated-field-recordings
      Harmonica Drones:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/harmonica-drones
      Fractal Drone Segments:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/fdrone-fragments
      Home Made Rhythm Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/various-home-made-rhythm-samples
      Various Wind Instrument Drone Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/various-wind-instrument-drone-samples
      Pan Pipes Drone Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/pan-pipes-drone-samples
      Flute Drone Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/flute-drone-samples
      Longform Recording of the a Rural Night:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/the-night
      Trombone Drone Samples:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/mystified-trombone-drone-samples
       
      · 0 replies
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