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  3. What a surprise to see my Computer Music Collection album nominated in the 2017 Schallwelle Awards. That is enough of an award to know people are listening to my challenging releases. Please download the album now at https://auralfilms.bandcamp.com/album/computer-music

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    The Seventh Wave Festival of Electronic Music: Number 5 Friday 09 March 2018 – Sunday 11 March 2018 Fifth Electronic Music Festival comes to Birmingham and this time around it includes an all-day free electronic music event featuring talks, demonstrations, interactive sessions, synth manufacturer attendance, a room for attendees to set up and show off their synth gear and a number of free live performances! In March of 2018 the fifth ‘The Seventh Wave Festival of Electronic Music’ takes place across three days. For a relatively small festival The Seventh Wave continues to get some of the biggest names in electronic and progressive music. This time around you can feast your eyes (and ears!) on Wolfgang Flur (Ex-Kraftwerk) who, let’s not forget, is one of the original members of Kraftwerk and Ulrich Schnauss, who as well as being a distinguished solo performer in his own right is a ‘modern day’ member of electronic giants Tangerine Dream. To cap it all, the Festival finishes with Ian Boddy (DiN Record Label Owner) who is one of the founding fathers of the electronic music scene in the United Kingdom. Read more - https://seventhwavefestivalofelectronicmusic.com/about/
  5. The OSCar was a synthesizer manufactured by the Oxford Synthesizer Company from 1983 to 1985. It was ahead of its time in several ways and was one of the few mono-synths of its time to have MIDI. Although the basic structure of the OSCar is the common subtractive synthesis model, it has many unusual features and design quirks. The main difference from other synthesizers of the time was its digital oscillators and control system. The oscillators have an array of standard wave shapes including triangle, sawtooth, square and a variable pulse-width modulation, but the digital system also provides additive synthesis. New waveforms can be created by changing the amplitudes of up to 24 harmonics, widening the available sound palette in comparison with purely analogue synths. The two oscillators can either be played together mono phonically, or the OSCar can be set in a duophonic mode where they keyboard controls one oscillator and the sequencer the other. The filter was actually two 12dB/Oct analog filters that can be combined into either a 24dB low pass, a 24dB high pass or a 12dB bandpass filter. Although this design appeared in other analog synths of the era, such as the Roland Jupiter-6, the OSCar has its own unique twist on it, by having a "Separation" control that allowed you to separate the filters' cutoff frequencies. This created two resonance peaks in the filter, giving a unique "vocal" character. The OSCar has an elementary sequencer. In duophonic mode it allows the user to play a monophonic lead whilst a sequence plays simultaneously. Many sequencers at the time only allowed notes of a fixed length to be used in their sequencers but on the OSCar it was possible to lengthen individual notes or insert spaces.
  6. The OSCar was a synthesizer manufactured by the Oxford Synthesiser Company from 1983 to 1985. It was ahead of its time in several ways and was one of the few mono-synths of its time to have MIDI. View full synthesizer
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  8. Monument by Ultravox

    Monument, released in 1983, is a live album by the British band Ultravox. It is the soundtrack to the live video of the same name, recorded at the London Hammersmith Odeon during the band's 1982 "Monument" tour. The opening title track is not live and is identical to the version found on the B-side of the "Hymn" single. The album peaked at no.9 on the UK album chart and was certified Gold by the BPI in January 1984 for 100,000 copies sold. The album was re-issued on CD in 1999 and was expanded, containing all of the songs from the video (but still not the entire concert). Monument was released again in 2009, as a CD/DVD package together. View full movie
  9. Monument by Ultravox

    Monument, released in 1983, is a live album by the British band Ultravox. It is the soundtrack to the live video of the same name, recorded at the London Hammersmith Odeon during the band's 1982 "Monument" tour. The opening title track is not live and is identical to the version found on the B-side of the "Hymn" single. The album peaked at no.9 on the UK album chart and was certified Gold by the BPI in January 1984 for 100,000 copies sold. The album was re-issued on CD in 1999 and was expanded, containing all of the songs from the video (but still not the entire concert). Monument was released again in 2009, as a CD/DVD package together.
  10. Ligand by MARTIN NONSTATIC

    A distant shadow whistling like a hollow breeze, hoops which spread layers of echoes, bubbles of white noises which burst and a cadaveric pulsation of a bass which tries to create a rhythm; "Innermost Structure" dips us back into this universe of soft rhythms and surrealist ambiences which had structured the main part of the last studio album from Martin Nonstatic, Granite released on the Lyonnais label Ultimae Records in 2015. And contrary to his nom de plume, Martin van Rossum proposes on “Ligand” another universe where the stasis of elements and of the white noises saturate structures where the rhythms try to hatch out from these embryos frozen in the oblivion. And "Innermost Structure" sets the tone with a movement of rhythm which pounds without exploding in a decoration where those white noises, some floating synth layers, nice percussive effects and the eternal reverberations oblige the new born rhythm to dance with its harmonious reflects. Built upon a mosaic which flirts with the 80 minutes, the music of “Ligand” is stigmatized with a fascinating paternity between each title. "Outermost Structure" seizes of finale of "Innermost Structure" for finally proposed a good mid-tempo splendidly decorated with percussive effects besides the usual Martin Nonstatic's sound fauna. It makes a title inspired and inspiring for these dances of Zombies gassed with ether. Effects of voices, layers of waters which crash between our ears, resounding sound arcs and an evasive melody add to the impressive sound flora of this album the elements of charms which give some more of depth to the very stylized psybient model of Martin van Rossum. "Parabolic View" is more in mode waiting and ambient, even with a harmonious structure raised on good impulses of sequences. Between rhythms and atmospheric variations, "Variegation" does rather futuristic. The setting is adorned of the reverberating effects from the bass line and good percussions metallized of sonic honey. A suspended drizzle cheers up the vibes with explosions of sizzling bubbles in this short title which offers after all some nice bumpy phases of rhythms. "Harmonices Mundi" is my real first crush in this “Ligand”. After a rather long introduction of ambiospherical extraterrestrial elements, a good structure of harmonious sequences draws a spheroidal approach on which get grafted a nice fluty shadow. The strong presence of this beast with a bass draws its reverberating effects while the scenery of ambient elements gets out from a sonic horn of plenty in order to feast around this so harmonious and danceable rhythm. We enter in the 2nd phase of this Martin Nonstatic's last album with "Methodical Random" and the title-track. Two tracks which blow incomplete rhythms in always phantasmagorical moods, where absent voices and organic effects always enrich the DNA of “Ligand”. "Trochilidae" is another catchy piece of music which proposes a nice down-tempo which is haloed of melancholy. A melancholy twisted by a piano as evanescent as tenderly poignant. The music is interrupted as much as the phases of rhythms. And here, it's a good spiral movement of the sequencer which connects ambiences and down-tempo. The bass pulsations, as it's all over the 80 minutes of this album, throws a resonance effect into our spinal bones and makes vibrate our soul. In this album where each title inhales the perfumes of the last one, Martin Nonstatic succeeded to amaze with new elements. As in "Parallel Thoughts" and its guitar riffs which appear from nowhere to make turn pale, although it's only for a short moment, the impressive sound fauna here. Always between brief phases of rhythms and these dense sound magmas blown by a mortuary bass, "Kepler's Laws" succeeds to wake up our waits with a strong layer of a vampiric bass which roams over a growing rhythm aborted in a high wall of ambiences. And "Dendrictic Ice" ends this last odyssey started in the imagination of Martin van Rossum with more strength and din in the phases of rhythm which rather seem to make laugh a layer of mocking bass. In a sound decoration simply galvanizing for the ears never full of sound delights, “Ligand” hits the jackpot! On the other hand, the constant struggling of the structures of rhythms and the amplification of the atmospheric phases will ask for some listening before really appreciate the complexity of this last Martin Nonstatic's album. And when it's done, we are entitled to hope for some very big things from this artist among whom the curiosity and the sound research should inevitably be transformed into works as much impressive as the biggest albums of this label of which the sound and the artistic aestheticism meet brilliantly the challenges that it's impose to itself. Sylvain Lupari (December 13th, 2017) *** ½**
  11. The Dark Interpreter Mater Tenebrarum

    The truth I heard often in sleep from the lips of the Dark Interpreter. Who is he? He is a shadow, reader, but a shadow with whom you must suffer me to make you acquainted. The Dark Interpreter operates as contagious sample or village granulator, distortion, and unique sound generator based on a speedy ARM processor allowing for 16 bit sampling at 48KHz, and with a sample memory of around one second (vastly extended by undersampling). The Dark Interpreter is delivered in three versions, all fully assembled and tested, and features high quality ALPS potentiometers, optional BOSS style 9v power socket (+9v/positive on the outside, negative centre, minimum 300mA) or battery clip, and now full size (6.5mm) Neutrik JACK input and output sockets. Please note that versions cannot be extended, they are not cross-compatible.
  12. The Dark Interpreter operates as contagious sample or village granulator, distortion, and unique sound generator based on a speedy ARM processor allowing for 16 bit sampling at 48KHz, and with a sample memory of around one second (vastly extended by undersampling). View full synthesizer
  13. Ligand by MARTIN NONSTATIC

    An electrifying stratosphere of vibrant realms and enchanting tonalities evolves with every breath of Martin Nonstatic’s hand-crafted synthscapes. Gently progressing into a dubby waterfall of mind-massaging oscillations, Ligand is an ambient downpour of dramatic euphoria. Dark, yet soulful minimalism is engraved within the atmospheric frequencies that paint its melancholy walls, a downtempo outcry of distant, mechanical pads and dystopian melodies crawling against an auditory horizon. The experience is an emotional voyage ; it takes us on a captivating journey into a faraway dimension without ever having to leave earth. It feels like a second home, and we invite you through its welcoming doors to explore a brand new world.
  14. The Grendel RA-9 Grenadier is a 1-oscillator analog monosynth with CV-Gate control. It has a semi-modular design in a tabletop enclosure with 1/4″ audio output. The Grenadier can be played stand-alone by using its keypad with 4 independently tuneable keys, or you can activate its onboard sequencer for minimal rhythm loops and tone sequences. Patch in a 1v/oct MIDI-CV converter (not included) and the Grenadier can play sequences from a MIDI workstation or computer. View full synthesizer
  15. The Grendel RA-9 Grenadier is a 1-oscillator analog monosynth with CV-Gate control. It has a semi-modular design in a tabletop enclosure with 1/4″ audio output. The Grenadier can be played stand-alone by using its keypad with 4 independently tuneable keys, or you can activate its onboard sequencer for minimal rhythm loops and tone sequences. Patch in a 1v/oct MIDI-CV converter (not included) and the Grenadier can play sequences from a MIDI workstation or computer. The Grenadier’s unique palette of analog tones comes from its triple bandpass filterbank with syncable modulation. Its voice is designed for electronic basslines and melodic sequences, as well as slow drones, electro percussion loops, bass drums, and more. The filterbank can also become a tone source by setting it to self-oscillate with warm low frequency overdrive. The Grenadier’s VCO offers square and triangle waveform. Its pitch can be modulated by the envelope generator for bass drops and other tuned analog percussion effects. The VCO waveform is synced to gate, for better bass output with staccato sequences. The decay envelope generator offers a wide range of decay times up to 60 seconds. The contour of the envelope can be reversed with the bipolar Envelope Depth knob, putting it solidly in the electro funk zone. The Grenadier’s LFO covers a wide range of 0.05 Hz (that’s once cycle every 20 seconds) up to 60 Hz, and can be reset by gate events for tempo-sync effects. The patch bay allows semi-modular control and multiplies the creative options when patching to itself, another Grenadier, MIDI-CV converters, and modular systems.** Fourteen patch points are provided including CV and gate in and out, clock in and out, LFO rate CV, and external audio input. It accepts Eurorack-type 1/8” (3.5mm) mono phone plugs. The Grendel Grenadier has a straightforward knob-per-function layout that avoids confusing context-sensitive controls. Each switch on the front panel has a red status LED that is easy to see, but not glaringly bright. The case is built of laser-cut steel with durable powder coat and silkscreened graphics. It has a sturdy-feeling build, weighing in at nearly 2 pounds. Grippy rubber feet elevate it above the table, and a pair of polished metal handles double as a roll cage to protect its control surface. The Grenadier is built to satisfy the need for creative analog equipment that stands the test of time. Features 4-step analog sequencer that outputs control voltage in a repeating cycle I-II-III-IV. Voltage of each step is controlled by the knob above each key I-IV. It steps once to the right each time it is triggered. The analog sequencer normally controls the VCO frequency for simple melodic sequences, and can be patched to sequence the filterbank, LFO rate, or an external module. Programmable Trigger Loop: It is normally synchronized to the LFO, or you can patch 16th-notes tempo clock to CLK IN. Program a rhythmic sequence of events in a 32-step (2 measure) endless loop by tapping the PROG-+ button in real time. Your input is quantized to the clock and repeats as long as clock is present. The trigger events can step the analog sequencer, trigger the envelope, or trigger an external module using the TRIG OUT patch point. LFO; The rate can be controlled with the LFO CV IN patch point. Its response is exponential (~0.5v/oct) and its frequency range is 0.05-60 Hz. The symmetry of the triangle wave is variable and the pulse wave output can be varied from 20..80% width by using the Symmetry knob. Activate the TRIG button and the LFO will sync (restart) with each gate event. This can give the impression of tempo-synced LFO effects, and also lets you use the LFO like a second envelope generator for the filterbank. The LFO Depth knob sets the level of filterbank modulation, and is a bipolar gain type control. The LFO Out patch point is post-LFO Depth. The CLK Out patch point normally sends unattenuated LFO square wave. Drone Button: cancels the volume envelope for endless sustained notes. And its filterbank can be driven into deep-pitched overdriven self-oscillations. The Drone Commander has two fixed oscillators, while the Grenadier has one VCO. But the Grenadier goes further with the addition of a VCA and envelope generator, plenty of CV connections, and a minimal onboard sequencer. The Grenadier has CV and Gate Output, CV In and Gate In, Clock In, Clock Out, Alpha In and Beta In (CV inputs to control the filterbank’s 2-axis parameters), ENV Out, LFO Out, Trig Out, Osc Out (Disconnects OSC from Filter, this lets you use it as an FX send), Ext In (FX return or mix in an external VCO)
  16. Frank Zappa Birthday

    Frank Vincent Zappa (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American musician, composer, activist and filmmaker. His work was characterized by nonconformity, free-form improvisation, sound experiments, musical virtuosity, and satire of American culture. In a career spanning more than 30 years, Zappa composed rock, pop, jazz, jazz fusion, orchestraland musique concrète works, and produced almost all of the 60-plus albums that he released with his band the Mothers of Invention and as a solo artist. Zappa also directed feature-length films and music videos, and designed album covers. He is considered one of the most innovative and stylistically diverse rock musicians of his era. As a self-taught composer and performer, Zappa's diverse musical influences led him to create music that was sometimes difficult to categorize. While in his teens, he acquired a taste for 20th-century classical composers such as Edgard Varèse, Igor Stravinsky, and Anton Webern, along with 1950s rhythm and blues and doo-wop music.[6] He began writing classical music in high school, while at the same time playing drums in rhythm and blues bands; later switching to electric guitar. His 1966 debut album with the Mothers of Invention, Freak Out!, combined songs in conventional rock and roll format with collective improvisations and studio-generated sound collages. He continued this eclectic and experimental approach, irrespective of whether the fundamental format was rock, jazz or classical. Read more - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Zappa
  17. Bernard Parmegiani Birthday

    Bernard Parmegiani (27 October 1927 − 21 November 2013) was a French composer best known for his electronic or acousmatic music. Between 1957 and 1961 he studied mime with Jacques Lecoq, a period he later regarded as important to his work as a composer. He joined the Groupe de Recherches Musicales (GRM) in 1959 for a two-year master class, shortly after its founding by Pierre Schaeffer. After leaving his studies with Lecoq, he was first a sound engineer and was later put in charge of the Music/Image unit for French television (ORTF). There he worked in the studio with several notable composers, Iannis Xenakis, for example. Parmegiani composed his first major work, Violostries, for violin and tape in 1964 for a choreography performed for Théâtre Contemporain d'Amiens directed by Jacques-Albert Cartier. During a visit to America in the late 1960s, Parmegiani researched the link between music and video and on his return produced several musical videos, including L'Œil écoute, and L'Écran transparent (1973) during a residency at Westdeutscher Rundfunk in Germany. In the 1970s, he also became involved with live performances of jazz and performed with the Third Ear Band in London. Read more - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Parmegiani
  18. Tristram Cary Birthday

    Tristram Ogilvie Cary, OAM (14 May 1925 – 24 April 2008) was a pioneering English-Australian composer. He was also active as a teacher and music critic. His concert works of note include a Sonata for guitar (1959), Continuum for tape (1969), a cantata Peccata Mundi (1972), Contours and Densities at First Hill for orchestra (1972), a Nonet (1979), String Quartet No. 2 (1985) and The Dancing Girls for orchestra (1991). Cary is also particularly well known for his film and television music. He wrote music for the science fiction television series Doctor Who(including the first Dalek story), as well as the score for the Ealing comedy The Ladykillers (1955). Later film scores included Quatermass and the Pit (1967) and Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971), both for Hammer. He also composed the score for the ABC TV animated version of A Christmas Carol. and the children's Animated special Katya and the Nutcracker. Read more - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tristram_Cary
  19. In Luv by MTA Lab

    In a parallel to his solo career, Thomas Meier highlights other musical visions within the trio MTA LAB which includes the musicians Marcel Margis (Synth, Sequencer and Drumcomputer) and Andre Danker (Synth and guitars) since 2016. Walking a little on ashes of Synthetica, especially for these dances of Zombies snorting ether, “In Luv” still exploits these evolutionary structures of rhythms where the sequences and the percussions confront or complete each other in a pond of percussive effects even more striking. Available in a download format on the Bandcamp site of SynGate, “In Luv” shows proudly its 80 minutes in a very good mosaic of rhythms and of ambiences where every title is linked within their differences. And there are! I discovered a very beautiful album where I had the feeling, and more than once, to hear some very good Pyramid Peak. "In Luv" starts with sinister waves where voices and vocal effects, as well as shadowy lines forge a nebulous introduction. Fragments of waves get loose to form sound strands a bit more melodious which float in this electronic decoration haloed of murmurs and of layers of voices. A sequence escapes from the attention of the sequencer to skip like a dolphin which pierces the horizon of waters while begin to stream some percussive ornaments as much pleasant to the ears as these songs of astral flutes begin to take forms more and more harmonious. A line of bass snores in this setting, spreading reverberating layers which give more depth to the slow evolution of "In Luv". Even with its very good effects of percussions, the structure of rhythm remains as so little conventional as the multiple capacities of the instruments which uses the German trio. If a synth charms with sharpened songs of flutes, another casts lines of bass reverberations which sculpt solos of which the origins seem to arise from the vintage years. The percussions, the oscillating sequences and the very good line of bass forge the base of a progressive rhythm which is slightly more livened up than ambient. The finale is melting in the immense jingles of "Timeless", where the synth layers are necessarily from the Backdance era. The rhythm is more livened up with an eternal ascent of the sequencer movement, sculpting even the movement of a train on the way towards mountains. It's a good title which sounds very Pyramid Peak (the splendid "Industrial Pulse" sounds even more) with good cosmic effects, a captivating rhythm and a sequencer which strews the road of jumping keys a bit uncontrollable. A very good piece of music which unloads its last beatings, a bit more muted, in the introductory tumult of "Synergy", a title heat up by multiple lines of sequences which bind themselves in automated percussions. This rhythm sparkles between our ears with a good liveliness, leaving little place to the synths which stand back, casting here and there reverberations of singing waves and very vintage electronic effects. Except towards the finale where a synth blows a little more dramatic, kind of apocalyptic, approach. So far, I like what I hear. It's a very good fusion between the retro and the new Berlin School styles. "Analogus" highlights this spasmodic movement of the sequencer which makes its keys oscillate in beautiful aerial effects and chirping solos. It's no big deal, but it passes very well because of the nuances in the structure of rhythm rather motorik. I also like the wealth of the anesthetic layers. Please adjust your earphones because "SynthFctry" proposes several little noisy and percussive effects. The rhythm is knotted in jerky spasms which parade like cutting knocks under the chants of a rather passive synth. Very good effects of organic percussions manhandle this convoluted structure in the 2nd part, so giving the taste to listen again to " SynthFctry " immediately. Except that the anarchy of the movement of crystal the balls is swallowed by a more fluid movement of the sequencer, of the bass percussions and of another movement which sounds like these old rock dances of the 70's and of the 80's. Between "SynthFctry" and "Timeless", "Industrial Pulse" screws us to our earphones with a so great electronic rock where the jingles of the percussions and the twinkling movement of the sequencer get a hold onto the elastic effect of the bass line. The solos are immense and intense. They give a little break to a rhythm which needs to breath before taking this shape of snakes fleeing a forest fire such as imagined by Chris Franke at the end of the 70's. Even the synth sometimes breathes of these perfumes of Tangerine Dream with very nice harmonious phases. It's a great track which invites us in a dance of fingers and to roll of the neck with great solos and fragments of harmonies in a setting richly vaporized of multiple effects in all sorts. And if we thought that we have hit the jackpot, "Sequenz Isolation" screws us even more profoundly in the universe of “In Luv” with another rich phase built on the ambiguities between the sequencer and the bludgeoning of the percussions, I hear Jarre here, while the synths, rich in harmonious solos, are apparently intimidated by the robustness and the creativity of Marcel Margis. As much good my friends as the best of Pyramid Peak! Sylvain Lupari (December 11th, 2017) ****½*
  20. In Luv by MTA Lab

    MTA Lab is a new project from a cooperation of friends around Thomas Meier, aka TM Solver. The trio plays the basic structures live, then the recording is being edited and mastered in the studio of TM Solver. M for Marcel Margis T for Thomas Meier (TM Solver) A for Andre Danker The three musicians were inspired to create an own project by different concerts of other electronic bands, they visited. The Album "In Luv" is the second album by this trio. An emphasis is to be found in hardwaresampling.
  21. GIFGROND #62

    until
    Gifgrond 62th party with 3 electronic live acts and one adventurous deejay on a toxic location! LOGOSAMPHIA(Sadra Hemati) is a composer of electronic music. With one foot in the French underground party scene, and another in The Netherlands avant-garde noise performance & arts, he represents one of the few Iranian musicians active in non-mainstream experimental electronic music. “In fact you can also say that Logosamphia is on the same level as Batman, Spiderman and Zorro; all masked fellows with secret identities, because nobody wants to bring the burden of their work home. But because we are bastards who love to stir things up, and bring you the revelations you never had thought you would wanted to know: It must have been that ‘Tehran tornado’ that blew our minds away” – Yeah I know it Sucks https://logosamphia.bandcamp.com OSILASI(Léa Roger/Célia Jankowski) is a French/Belgium duo with percussion, celtic harp, voice and electronics. Their music is an influence of traditional music passed by their care to the mill and raised with a noisy sauce. Sometimes intimate, sometimes feverish, motives oscillate, evolve, unfold, and transform freely according to the perception of the moment. https://soundcloud.com/osilasi COOLHAVEN(Peter Fengler /Lukas Simonis/Hajo Doorn) is Rotterdam's celebrated dada-pop act. Coolhaven will present it’s new 10 inch vinyl release entitled 'Rode Pruik' which boasts comic book-style artwork by Johannes van de Weert. Coolhaven is "a flexible group that flows in a realistic-capitalistic manner if needed and dries up where fluid is redundant". Johannes was a cartoonist in the Rotterdam punk and squatter movements of the 1980s next to being the vocalist of the influential Rotterdam-based punk band De Rondos (1977 – 1980). He started self-publishing comic booklets in the late 1970s and famously created the 'Redrat' character for the fanzine 'Raket' in 1980, which soon became an icon for the squatter's movement. At this event Coolhaven will perform covers of both De Rondos and Tandstickorshocks, as 'Rode Pruik' is a reworking of old hits from both bands. According to Coolhaven's Lukas Simonis, "The reworking is done with a Gabber feel, which suited those songs like a glove". http://deplayer.nl/releases/dob-090-rode-pruik DJ Bs Crazy and adventurous! You can hire him! p.s. extremely difficult to delete! http://www.gifgrond.nl/
  22. Hi there, at the moment, my electronic music work is found on http://animoog.org/satri Cheers -- Alex / Satri

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Welcome, Satri. Is that for the Moog Animoog?
      I love that synth. <3

  23. Radel Saarang Miraj Plus Digital Tanpura

    The Radel Saarang Miraj Plus digital tanpura sounds so close to a traditional tanpura, that professional Indian classical musicians and teachers have overwhelmingly pronounced it to be the ultimate digital tanpura. The Miraj Plus digital tanpura can be used as a 4 / 5 / 6-string tanpura. It has a range of more than an octave. Standard pitch settings, with ultra fine-tuning to intermediate levels is provided. Other features are: – Tempo control to vary the speed of plucking Tone control to vary the bass-treble balance – Pluck control to vary the softness or firmness of pluck – Sustain control for varying the sustenance of strings – Pancham/ madhyam/ nishad/ only shadj selection – Nishad fine-tuning – Option of using 4/5/6 strings – Positioning of 5th and 6th strings befor or after pancham – Fine-tuning of 5th and 6th string – Auto-save plus 10 individual settings of pitch, tempo, pluck and sustain can be stored and recalled. – A convenient LCD panel displays all selections – A stylish gold-tone cabinet All standard Radel features: – Auto-save, automatic switch-over to batteries if mains power fails – Lightweight, safe and strong ABS plastic cabinet – 3-year warranty – Reliable Radel service
  24. Grains of Sand

    Ambient guitar looping with an assortment of stomp boxes, two valve amps, two 2x12 cabs, recorded via SM57's onto a Zoom H1. Tracks sent to Melbourne for Dean Richards where he adds his magic touch. They return here, I master them using T-Racks and hey presto, we have an album of delightful relaxing music that you can listen to or have as a background sound source for helping you sleep, study, work....
  25. I hope you are all well and preparing for a special festive season ahead, hot n sunny for us, maybe cold and snowy for others.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Hey hey, good to hear from ya. Have a great Festivus! 

      happyfestivus-t-shirt-sand-swatch-400x400.jpg

  26. Spiryto

    Brand new kitschsonic piano moods.
  27. Mysterioso

    Album release on CerebralAudio.
  28. Live and studio recordings of Ruckzuck, Kling Klang, Autobahn, Antenna, Radio-Activity, Trans Europe Express, Computer Love, The Robots, The Model, Metropolis, Pocket Calculator and many others. As innovative as they are influential, Kraftwerk's contribution to the development of electronic music since their formation in 1970 remains unsurpassed. Having inspired everyone from Bowie to Coldplay, Siouxsie to Radiohead, this bizarre collective have also proven partly responsible for entire genres to develop; electronica, techno and synth pop to name but three. This DVD reviews the career and music of Kraftwerk, from their inception in the late 1960s (as pre-Kraftwerk ensemble Organisation), through their most celebrated period in the mid 1970s, and culminating with their resurgence during the 1980s with the popularity of synth-pop and techno. The film further explores how Kraftwerk both fitted in and pulled away from the electronic wing of what is often lazily referred to as ‘Krautrock’. Sparing time also for many of the groups’ contemporaries from the same field, and tracing the unfolding of electronics in German contemporary music generally, this programme presents a fascinating story previously untold on film. Features Include: Rarely seen live and performance footage of Kraftwerk and of other Electronic and ‘Krautrock’ bands – much from private collections. Exclusive and extensive Interviews with; ex-Kraftwerk members Karl Bartos and Klaus Röder; other German ambient and electronic musicians, Dieter Moebius (Kluster/Harmonia), Hans Joachim Rodelius (Kluster/Harmonia), Klaus Schulze (Tangerine Dreams/ Ash Ra Tempel /Solo), Wolfgang Siedel (Eruption/Tangerine Dream/ Kluster), Conrad Snitzler (Kluster/ Solo) and Klaus Löhmer [engineer, Kraftwerk album] Contributions, review and enlightenment from German academics, writers and journalists, Professor Diedrich Diedrichsen (German Sounds), Ingeborg Schober (German Sounds), Manfred Gillig-Degrave (Stereoplay, Audio, Musicwoche) – and from the UK, David Stubbs (Melody Maker, Wire), Mark Prendergrast (author The Ambient Century), Edwin Pouncey (Sounds) David Toop (ambient musician and writer), David Ball (Soft Cell/The Grid) , Rusty Egan (Visage/The Blitz Club) Rare photographs of Kraftwerk and others Live and studio recordings of many of Kraftwerk’s pivotal tracks, including; Ruckzuck, Kling Klang, Autobahn, Antenna, Radio-Activity, Trans Europe Express, Computer Love, The Robots, The Model, Metropolis, Pocket Calculator and many others. Live and studio recordings of many other bands form the ‘Krautrock’ movement. This film is not authorized by Kraftwerk View full movie
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