All Activity

This stream auto-updates   

  1. Past hour
  2. Today
  3. Rucci 8-Bit Power Synthesizer
  4. The 8-Bit Power Synthesizer produces lo-fi sounds reminiscent of retro video games. It has a single octave keyboard with an octave control knob to sweep through a full six octaves. It is monophonic and only the highest key pressed will sound. View full synthesizer
  5. Yesterday
  6. Gil Mellé Percussotron III
  7. The Percussotron III was an 8-voice analog percussion synthesizer developed by Gil Mellé for use on the 1971 "Andromeda Strain" soundtrack. The synthesizer featured 8 separate voices each with its own settings and percussion trigger pad. The Percussotron III was designed for making electronic percussion as well as other sound effects. View full drum machine
  8. Last week
  9. The Triwave is a dual tone generator with three LFO’s and potential for many options and modifications (mods). Primarily an instrument in either mono or stereo (optional) configurations, the Triwave can also accept various audio, trigger, and control inputs. View full synthesizer
  10. 4ms Triwave Picogenerator
  11. T.R.I.v.M. - Expanoid
  12. Rucci Touch Synthesizer
  13. This handmade synthesizer is played by bridging the contact points. There are 15 contact points, each of which plays a higher pitch. It is monophonic and will sound the highest pitch being played and 2 effect points. View full synthesizer
  14. Klaus Schulze - Dune
  15. The x0xi0 Synthesizer is a full-featured instrument based on the core of the Roland TB-303. The development of the complete synthesizer was a natural progression from the x0xi0 DIY kits for x0xb0x. View full synthesizer
  16. x0xi0 Synthesizer Rev B
  17. MAXON DS200 is 2 channel analog drum synthesizer module. It plays 2 sounds at once that can be mixed into it's main output. The unit offers knobs for editing the sounds into your own creations.It can be played from a drum pad or triggered from a drum machine or other analog devices. View full drum machine
  18. Maxon Model DS200 Drum Synthesizer
  19. DB9 is a 1U rack mountable unit, with 10 dials, no hidden menus or function keys like some over complicated designs. This was essentially an imitation of the TB-303, while not hugely similar it has since become an instrument in its on right. Has one oscillator with saw and square wave. Can also be used as an audio filter for external sounds. View full synthesizer
  20. Control Synthesis Deep Bass Nine
  21. The Skychord Glamour Box is an all analog dual oscillator synth with wave shaping and hurting of sounds of the Glamour box. The signal may be effected by the external audio input. The Glamour Box facilitates a wide range of maddening sounds ranging from sick static to modulating volcanic eruptions which are shoveled into all out sub-thunder explosions, and grated scraping high frequencies. The Glamour Box has an external audio input that smashes incoming signal inside of the two sweepable oscillators creating a vortex of intense distorted schizophrenic undulations View full synthesizer
  22. Skychord Electronics Glamour Box
  23. IMG_5406.JPG

    1. CIIIGoff

      CIIIGoff

      I'll second those sentiments

      The Reel (to Reel) McCoy

  24. Raymond Scott special on this week's Deprogramming Center broadcast.  Features Scott music plus some Scott tributes, including pieces by Encyclotronic's own Jack Hertz and Jon Johnson. 

    Live on KOWS, 12 AM Saturday (midnight Friday) USA Pacific Daylight Time here: 

    KOWS

    if this appointment is inconvenient, a (p)replay is available here for the next month or so...

    Deprogramming Center #44

  25. “A Machine Music Manifesto” by Thomas Park

     

                    Earlier in 2017 I brought up some ideas for a “New Industrial Music”. A main component of this music involved using field recordings made of urban locations as sources. Rather than guitars and drum machines, actual recordings of the city were to be the source of sound. This idea has been further developed into a notion of ‘Machine Music”. Recordings of machines can be used as source material for this kind of composition, and the use of machines found in an urban setting makes Machine Music both its own variety and an extension of the New Industrial category.

                    I have made this observation, and my wife recently mentioned this of her own accord, that music on the radio follows certain formulae. She noticed that there were similarities between songs that went deeper than style, and got into using singers whose voices closely resembled one another, or the same technologies and instruments creating the same sounds (such as a use of “autotune”, which forces sounds, and especially vocals, to comply to a specific pitch). In a certain way, the mainstream music business is itself mechanical—methods and designs are used quite abstractly to generate products, much in the same way that factory machines do. Why not, then, simply express what is essential and make a music of machines?

                  Many forms of music already use or involve machines. Instruments are or resemble machines, as do devices used to record, including microphones and mixing decks, computers, and so forth. We master our sounds using software, on a computer. Files are burned to disc, or distributed online, passed from one machine to another and eventually to a mobile device or stereo.

                  Machine sounds themselves can be found in some music, especially in industrial music. A band might mix in a recording of factory equipment, or use power drills or similar devices as sonic sources, whether live on in the studio (such as the band Einsteurzende Neubauten). The machines create a supplemental voice in the mix, or are used as one or a few elements. I would propose that machines should become the dominant, or perhaps the only, sound source in a new type of music. How often do we need to hear a guitar, flute, or bongo? Why not explore and convey a new set of sounds made by mechanical devices?

                   Machines can make interesting and often rich sounds. A normal microphone can pick them up, but even better is a contact microphone. A contact mic is a small disc that is attached to a surface. It picks up the vibrations running through the surface, passing along the sounds manifested in its target. Contact mics are great for recording the various sounds that machines make as they turn on or off and run through their many cycles.

                     An excellent example of a machine as audio source is a washing machine. A washing machine produces literally dozens of sounds, as it moves from cycle to cycle. Each part of the washing process has its own sound, from the percolating sound of water filling the tank to various speeds of grind as the clothes are spun about. These sounds can be captured and further processed using audio software—excellent methods are to try various forms of granulation, or to add distortion or reverberation effects.

                    Composing using machine sounds can be as simple or as complex as needed. Many machine sounds are variations of noise (or noisy drones), and therefore they do not need to be tuned, and can be mixed together and layered freely. Occasional machine sounds have a pitch, which can be used as a source of tonality, or adjusted to match any other pitches using basic audio software.

                    What is the effect of such compositions? This may vary, but generally by using machine sounds, though some amount of noise exists within the pieces, it is quite easy to create a regular, repetitive, precise and meticulous kind of music. I would generally call these kinds of pieces “soundscapes”, as they are ambient drone collages of sound. The sounds in the pieces seem to come from the same sonic family, and indeed they do, having been recorded from similar sources. This effect is heightened if the same recording method is used throughout (for example, the same contact microphone, recording at the same fidelity). It is the case that machines provide their very own new category of instrumentation, and can harnessed to craft music with a very distinct aesthetic.

                    I hope that readers will consider furthering the New Industrial idea and developing a music of machines. It is a more honest approach to music, I feel, than regarding contemporary mainstream music as being anything other than mechanical itself. If a music is essentially of a machine, why not make it to sound that way? Machine Music provides a direct and authentic aesthetic of pragmatic, exact, and repetitive sounds, without using classical instruments or the human voice. Machine Music paves a clear path ahead in the world of music, and it is a good time to establish and explore this path.

     

  26. The Sismo Qad4 is a portable square wave generator with four analog oscillators, adjustable by pitch potentionmeters , built in amplifier and output, powered by battery or external power source. View full synthesizer
  27. Sismo Quad4
  28. View full synthesizer
  29. Sismo twin-T
  1. Load more activity
  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Forum Statistics

    2,353
    Total Topics
    2,898
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    2,029
    Total Members
    255
    Most Online
    jdksounds
    Newest Member
    jdksounds
    Joined
  • Social Networks

    Facebook - Google+ - Pintrest - Tumblr - Twitter - YouTube

  • Recent Status Updates

    • CIIIGoff

      Raymond Scott special on this week's Deprogramming Center broadcast.  Features Scott music plus some Scott tributes, including pieces by Encyclotronic's own Jack Hertz and Jon Johnson. 
      Live on KOWS, 12 AM Saturday (midnight Friday) USA Pacific Daylight Time here: 
      KOWS
      if this appointment is inconvenient, a (p)replay is available here for the next month or so...
      Deprogramming Center #44
      · 0 replies
    • Mystified

      “A Machine Music Manifesto” by Thomas Park
       
                      Earlier in 2017 I brought up some ideas for a “New Industrial Music”. A main component of this music involved using field recordings made of urban locations as sources. Rather than guitars and drum machines, actual recordings of the city were to be the source of sound. This idea has been further developed into a notion of ‘Machine Music”. Recordings of machines can be used as source material for this kind of composition, and the use of machines found in an urban setting makes Machine Music both its own variety and an extension of the New Industrial category.
                      I have made this observation, and my wife recently mentioned this of her own accord, that music on the radio follows certain formulae. She noticed that there were similarities between songs that went deeper than style, and got into using singers whose voices closely resembled one another, or the same technologies and instruments creating the same sounds (such as a use of “autotune”, which forces sounds, and especially vocals, to comply to a specific pitch). In a certain way, the mainstream music business is itself mechanical—methods and designs are used quite abstractly to generate products, much in the same way that factory machines do. Why not, then, simply express what is essential and make a music of machines?
                    Many forms of music already use or involve machines. Instruments are or resemble machines, as do devices used to record, including microphones and mixing decks, computers, and so forth. We master our sounds using software, on a computer. Files are burned to disc, or distributed online, passed from one machine to another and eventually to a mobile device or stereo.
                    Machine sounds themselves can be found in some music, especially in industrial music. A band might mix in a recording of factory equipment, or use power drills or similar devices as sonic sources, whether live on in the studio (such as the band Einsteurzende Neubauten). The machines create a supplemental voice in the mix, or are used as one or a few elements. I would propose that machines should become the dominant, or perhaps the only, sound source in a new type of music. How often do we need to hear a guitar, flute, or bongo? Why not explore and convey a new set of sounds made by mechanical devices?
                     Machines can make interesting and often rich sounds. A normal microphone can pick them up, but even better is a contact microphone. A contact mic is a small disc that is attached to a surface. It picks up the vibrations running through the surface, passing along the sounds manifested in its target. Contact mics are great for recording the various sounds that machines make as they turn on or off and run through their many cycles.
                       An excellent example of a machine as audio source is a washing machine. A washing machine produces literally dozens of sounds, as it moves from cycle to cycle. Each part of the washing process has its own sound, from the percolating sound of water filling the tank to various speeds of grind as the clothes are spun about. These sounds can be captured and further processed using audio software—excellent methods are to try various forms of granulation, or to add distortion or reverberation effects.
                      Composing using machine sounds can be as simple or as complex as needed. Many machine sounds are variations of noise (or noisy drones), and therefore they do not need to be tuned, and can be mixed together and layered freely. Occasional machine sounds have a pitch, which can be used as a source of tonality, or adjusted to match any other pitches using basic audio software.
                      What is the effect of such compositions? This may vary, but generally by using machine sounds, though some amount of noise exists within the pieces, it is quite easy to create a regular, repetitive, precise and meticulous kind of music. I would generally call these kinds of pieces “soundscapes”, as they are ambient drone collages of sound. The sounds in the pieces seem to come from the same sonic family, and indeed they do, having been recorded from similar sources. This effect is heightened if the same recording method is used throughout (for example, the same contact microphone, recording at the same fidelity). It is the case that machines provide their very own new category of instrumentation, and can harnessed to craft music with a very distinct aesthetic.
                      I hope that readers will consider furthering the New Industrial idea and developing a music of machines. It is a more honest approach to music, I feel, than regarding contemporary mainstream music as being anything other than mechanical itself. If a music is essentially of a machine, why not make it to sound that way? Machine Music provides a direct and authentic aesthetic of pragmatic, exact, and repetitive sounds, without using classical instruments or the human voice. Machine Music paves a clear path ahead in the world of music, and it is a good time to establish and explore this path.
       
      · 0 replies
    • Mystified

      "Gamma" by Grid Resistor-- music made using only recordings of machines:
      https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/gamma-grid-resistor
      Free at Bandcamp.
      And don't miss the "Grid Resistor Playlist", steadily growing:
       
      · 0 replies
  • Classifieds