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  1. 2 points
    George Orwell Meets 2017's USA Ride The Train Of Dissonance To "Untopia" Our hero, Glarmen Glamours, takes on today's Big Brother with sound collage and dramatic electro-acoustical vigor. Curious? Click the Pic Below and Go: Untopia The first review is already in (quote Gerbil Bliss...) The perfect soundtrack to Washington crazy. Tired of trying to apply logic to the sh*t going down in our federal and state governments? Here's a soundtrack of a response. The Universe help us all! Enjoy while we still have an open Title II regulated Internet.
  2. 1 point
    Moog Music’s engineers have crafted the Sub Phatty’s oscillators to perform with extreme accuracy and require almost no warm-up time. Just power up, dial in your settings, and put your fingers to work on the keys to summon crisp and detailed waveforms, a vibrant and articulate sound that more than honors the rich sonic density synonymous with Moog creations. The Sub Phatty is the first analog synth to feature Moog’s transformative new Multidrive section; at low settings Multidrive adds warmth and girth, but when pushed, it delivers a screaming snarl that is highly reactive to resonance, waveshape, and oscillator level. Experiment with this new circuit and unlock an undiscovered world of vivid analog tonalities. The mixer section offers innovations of its own, including a sub oscillator that outputs a square wave one octave below Oscillator 1. Use this powerful tool as a third oscillator for added depth, or to craft your own customized incarnation of monstrous Moog bass. Also in the mixer section is a noise generator voiced to deliver low-frequency content, rich with body and punch. If your goal is to sculpt analog percussion and sound effects, look no further. The Sub Phatty features a wide range of parameters just below the surface, and all features are easily accessible from the instrument’s front panel, or via the free standalone/plugin editor. Select filter poles, assign wave mod destinations, or specify pitch bend amounts — it’s all there. The Sub Phatty brings a fearless new voice to the Moog family of synthesizers. With its streamlined interface and dynamic sound design flexibility, this new synth fuses an unparalleled connection between human & machine, opening the door to unprecedented sonic exploration.
  3. 1 point
    RAYMOND SCOTT (1908-1994) was one of the most prolific and central figures in 20th century music, with a career that began in the 1930s swing/big-band era, and continued through the experimental electronic music age of the 1970s. Although Scott was a famous figure during the mid-twentieth century, and currently has a dedicated cult following (that includes some of the most renowned artists in the music world), his name — not his music — remains largely unknown to the general public. But now there is a documentary film about this maverick musician, composer, inventor, and electronic music pioneer that will help raise awareness of this visionary. Deconstructing Dad tells the story of Scott’s life and career from a unique perspective, that of his only son, Stan Warnow. Raymond Scott first came to the attention of the music world on CBS radio with his innovative group the Raymond Scott Quintette in late 1936. He went on to a career that included writing music for and appearances in several Hollywood films, touring Big Bands, and in the 1940s he formed the first integrated radio orchestra — a jazz group that was a critical favorite. It included jazz greats like Coleman Hawkins and Cozy Cole. Along the way, many of his highly original musical compositions — with their characteristic sophisticated yet quirky melodies and rhythms — were licensed by Warner Bros.for their internationally famous LOONEY TUNES. If you’ve ever been entertained by the wacky antics of Bugs Bunny, or the Road Runner and Wile Coyote, you’ve almost surely heard his music. He’s been called “the man who made cartoons swing.” Later in the 1940s, he wrote the music for the Broadway musical Lute Song, which starred Yul Brynner and Mary Martin. In the 1950s he led the orchestra for Your Hit Parade, on NBC television composed several film scores, and wrote commercial jingles. But this work was minor compared to the work he was doing in the emerging field of electronic music. He had always been fascinated by the technology of music and was a highly accomplished audio engineer. From the 1950s through the 1970s he invented and refined a dazzling array of electronic musical instruments (as well as other devices like an early fax machine), that were years ahead of what was being done elsewhere. Scott’s crowning invention, The Electronium, which he described as ”an instantaneous composition and performance machine,” was purchased by Berry Gordy for Motown, and Scott worked for Motown for several years as their Director of Electronic Music Research and Development. When his years at Motown ended, he spent several more years on the Electronium and other electronic music projects, until he was crippled by a stroke in the mid-1980s which rendered him unable to work. He died in Van Nuys, California in 1994. He was married three times and fathered four children, one of whom directed this documentary. This is the official website for the film.
  4. 1 point
    Wait for the little creatures to come out...
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  6. 1 point
    From the debut release of Model 201, a musical act by Thomas Park that only uses sounds extracted from old analog cassettes as source material. Get the audio here: https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/series-1-model-201