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  1. 1 point
    A Single Hub For All Of Thomas Park's Media: "Benchmark: Hub": https://archive.org/details/ThomasParkBenchmarkHub
  2. 1 point
  3. 1 point
    Great to have another mallet controller on the market...and especially the price! wow! Huge undercut on Alternate Mode (and Buchla... not sure if they still make their mallet instrument). Ive been playing a malletkat since the 90s. Unfortunately they are a bit susceptible to humidity and I'm in a high humidity area. Ive had to send it in to AM a couple times and it's currently not working properly again. Hopefully this model will have better defences against humidity. I like the extra (optional) bars in the accidental keys. A very cool option to have...though I might color it or mark it to avoid confusion. Would be cool for triggering other sounds or chords while soloing, and lotsa other possibilities. Also the extra controls on the right are a huge plus too. I kinda dislike the look of using the drum cymbal stands as a stand. I think Pearl should have used that system for mounting, which is great for adding to a rack like the vibes above, but created something a little more aesthetically pleasing and unique that complements this great creation.. of course just my .02$. But it could easily be mounted (I think) on any kind of keyboard stand laying flat..so not a deal buster or anything. The playing surface will be crucial. Looks like a hard surface. Couldn't imagine it would be though. But at any rate, the feel and action will be a crucial point. Some people mention it didnt have all the midi inputs. I haven't seen the specs. But I personally love the USB option. That's another sweet feature the others don't have. I think this is going to put a dent on Alternate Mode's malletkat. More competition is a good thing though.
  4. 1 point
    This one and Lennon/Ono's Two Virgins were some of my first exposures to electronic/experimental music. I was a 10 year old SF Bay Area kid back then, and while I was initially seeking out something a bit more "familiar" from these albums, the exposure I got to the avant garde mystified and intrigued me enough to eventually lead me to becoming a creator of unique sonic experiments myself. I should add that Revolution 9 was a big part of this exposure too. I've heard a lot of stories about how Beaver and Krause felt like they'd been Harrison's robbery victims with the release of this album. I'll just say that whatever dirty stuff that may have gone on regarding its production, the album's sounds got to my young ears and affected my brain permanently, and for this I'm indebted to everyone involved. The 5 stars indicate more my feeling about the whole than perhaps the "quality" of the sounds, but both make up a well-driven road on my synapses.
  5. 1 point
    Recorded in November 1968 and February 1969 George’s Electronic Sound was released in May 1969, it was the second, and final, record released on The Beatles’ Apple Records subsidiary label, Zapple Records. It was yet more proof that George was ahead of his time and in many respects the most musically enquiring of the four Beatles. Electronic Sound is made up of two long pieces of music, originally one on each side of the LP, that are performed on the Moog synthesizer; the Moog IIIc modular system was purchased by George from its inventor, Robert Moog. The record was made against a background of musical exploration that characterised London and Los Angeles in 1968 …Avant-garde was everywhere. Side 2 of the album ‘No Time or Space’ was the first to be recorded and was done in Los Angeles in November 1968. George had finished work on The Beatles (White Album) and had flown to America’s West Coast to produce Jackie Lomax’s Apple album, Is This What You Want? at Sound Recorders Studio in Hollywood. Lomax’s album featured a Moog that had been brought to the studio by Bernie Krause, who along with musical partner, Paul Beaver, had recorded The Nonsuch Guide to Electronic Music, and was acting as something of a ‘salesman’ for Robert Moog’s invention. It was following work on the Lomax album that George, with Krause’s help, recorded the 25 minute piece. Side one of the LP is ‘Under the Mersey Wall’, an 18 minute piece that references the river on which Liverpool is built and it was recorded at Kinfauns, George’s home in Esher, Surrey, in February 1969. The title also refers to a weekly column in The Liverpool Echo, written by another George Harrison (no relation), entitled ‘Over the Mersey Wall’. In 1970 white noise from this track was used on ‘I Remember Jeep’, one of the jams included on All Things Must Pass. The album’s cover was a painting done by George and many years later his son Dhani asked his father if he could have the painting that was leaning against a wall, somewhat neglected, at home in Henley, to hang in his bedroom. A few years later George explained to Dhani what the painting was all about, “That’s Derek (Taylor) holding on to all of Apple’s aggravation and problems that are looming over everyone. That’s Neil (Aspinall) frowning and Mal (Evans) smiling with him in the chair. That’s Eric (Clapton) on the right there and the green guy on the front is Bernie (Krause), with his bow tie and pocket square, patching everything through the board. That’s me making the tea (small blue face smiling) and that’s the cat, Jostick, the small green demon like figure on the front cover.” The album and George’s Moog itself play an important part in The Beatles story as it was taken to Abbey Road studios in the summer of 1969 and used in the recording of The Beatles’ Abbey Road. As George later recalled, “The Moog synthesiser was enormous, with hundreds of jack plugs and two keyboards. But it was one thing having one, it was another thing making it work. When you listen to the sounds on songs like, ‘Here Comes The Sun’, it does some good things, but they’re all very kind of infant sounds.” Electronic Sound is a musical marker, one that George laid down during a period of intense inventiveness and in a world where everything and anything were possible.
  6. 1 point
    The story of Nonsuch's world music albums can be best summed up by David Lewiston's life story. One of the early producers of World music. He passed away in May of this year. There's an excellent memorial to him on the Nonsuch site: http://www.nonesuch.com/journal/david-lewiston-musical-explorer-dies-88-2017-05-30 For me, growing up in suburban Maryland. Nonesuch was one of the few labels that released stuff I knew I never heard before. Believe it or not, I found "Silver Apples of a Moon" at a shopping mall record store.
  7. 1 point
    We invited all musicians & sound artists to produce a three to seven minutes works based on Shamanism & Pagan traditions from all over the world. We believe the knowledge of our ancestors to be relevant for our contemporary understanding of nature and human life.
  8. 1 point
    " In World War I, no man's land often ranged from several hundred yards to in some cases less than 10 yards. Heavily defended by machine guns, mortars, artillery and riflemen on both sides, it was often riddled with barbed wire and rudimentary improvised land mines, as well as corpses and wounded soldiers who were not able to make it across the sea of explosions and fire. The area was usually devastated by the warfare, carnage and remains of the artillery. It was open to fire from the opposing trenches and hard going generally slowed down any attempted advance. However, not only were soldiers forced to cross no man's land when advancing, and as the case might be when retreating, but after an attack the stretcher bearers would need to go out into it to bring in the wounded. No man's land remained a regular feature of the battlefield until near the end of World War I, when mechanized weapons (ie. tanks) made entrenched lines less of an obstacle. "
  9. 1 point
    Excellent. Just what I am looking for.