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  1. 9 points
  2. 3 points
  3. 3 points
    Great pack, instantly wrote a little jam with my FM Volca.
  4. 2 points
    http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Klopenn/The_Cure_of_Folly/
  5. 2 points
    What a surprise to see my Computer Music Collection album nominated in the 2017 Schallwelle Awards. That is enough of an award to know people are listening to my challenging releases. Please download the album now at https://auralfilms.bandcamp.com/album/computer-music
  6. 2 points
    Carols To Challenge Your Ears? Need an alternative this season? Try these: https://archive.org/details/NoelPortersHolidayCollectionVolume2
  7. 2 points
    (Warning - contains flashing images) Finally made a reasonable video for my 'Half Live on the Bed' thing of July 2016, based on a Mixcraft 7 performance panel test from December 2015 (which makes up the 2nd half, the 1st half is me improvising on the YRG, playing the original at different improvised pitches). I only got it done on Thursday when I stumbled across an offer for Sony Vegas Movie Suite which is the first thing I've come across that enables more than one video line to be edited at a time I was able to edit the video in a couple of hours. Unfortunately it took 5 and a half hours to render it into a file and 13 hours to upload it to Youtube . Anyway, enjoy.
  8. 2 points
    (No Pussyfooting) is the debut studio album by the British musicians Robert Fripp and Brian Eno (credited as Fripp & Eno). The album was released in 1973. (No Pussyfooting) was the first of three major collaborations between the musicians, growing out of Eno's early tape recording loop experiments and Fripp's "Frippertronics" electric guitar technique. Brian Eno invited Robert Fripp to his London home studio in September 1972. Eno was experimenting with a tape system developed by Terry Riley and Pauline Oliveros where two reel-to-reel tape recorders were set up side-by side. Sounds recorded on the first deck would be played back by the second deck, and then routed back into the first deck to create a long looping tape delay. Fripp played guitar over Eno's loops, while Eno selectively looped or recorded Fripp's guitar without looping it. The result is a dense, multi-layered piece of ambient music. This technique later came to be known as "Frippertronics". (No Pussyfooting) 's first track, which fills one side, is a 21-minute piece titled "The Heavenly Music Corporation". Fripp originally wanted the track titled "The Transcendental Music Corporation", which Eno didn't allow as he feared it would make people "think they were serious". It was recorded in two takes, first creating the background looping track, then adding an extended non-looped guitar solo over the backing track. This track features Fripp's electric guitar as the sole sound source. The second track "Swastika Girls", which fills the other side, was recorded almost a year after "The Heavenly Music Corporation" in August 1973 at Command Studios at 201 Piccadilly in London. The track employed the same technique as "The Heavenly Music Corporation" except Fripp played to a background electronic loop created by Eno on VCS3. Fripp and Eno took the tapes of "Swastika Girls" to British record producer George Martin's Air Studios at Oxford Circus to continue mixing and assembling the track there.[6] The track's title refers to an image of nude women performing a Nazi salute that was ripped from a discarded pornographic film magazine found by Eno at AIR studios. Eno stuck the image on the recording console while recording the track with Fripp and it became the title of the track. (No Pussyfooting) was released in November 1973 and failed to chart on either the American or British charts. It was met with negative reaction from the record label itself, Island Records, who were actively opposed to it. The album was released in the same year as Eno's more rock-based solo album Here Come the Warm Jets. Eno was attempting to launch a solo career, having just left Roxy Music, and his management bemoaned the confusion caused by the release of two albums with such different styles. Robert Fripp's bandmates in King Crimson also disliked the album. The mainstream rock press also did not pay the album much attention compared to Fripp's work with King Crimson and to Eno's solo album. In the UK, the album was released at a large discount compared to normal album prices and was regarded as something of a musical novelty.
  9. 2 points
  10. 2 points
    George Orwell Meets 2017's USA Ride The Train Of Dissonance To "Untopia" Our hero, Glarmen Glamours, takes on today's Big Brother with sound collage and dramatic electro-acoustical vigor. Curious? Click the Pic Below and Go: Untopia The first review is already in (quote Gerbil Bliss...) The perfect soundtrack to Washington crazy. Tired of trying to apply logic to the sh*t going down in our federal and state governments? Here's a soundtrack of a response. The Universe help us all! Enjoy while we still have an open Title II regulated Internet.
  11. 2 points
    This is the album I have been waiting for. The new material featuring outtakes and isolated tracks, pulls back the curtains to reveal the master at work. Up there with the IBM computer singing "Daisy", the world's first Artificial Intelligence music generator can be heard under the command of Raymond Scott himself. Hearing what the Electronium really sounded like in action gave me goosebumps. These are the moments avid listeners live for. Rare they may be in this day and age, the new release from Basta Music, "Three Willow Park: Electronic Music from Inner Space, 1961–71" delivers many of these moments. The follow-up to the 2000 "Manhattan Research Inc." album that effectively turned the world onto Raymond Scott. This new release takes a closer look at the man and his instruments, especially the Electronium. The music and accompanying book are some of the most detailed examinations of Raymond's electronic "sidemen", that he designed and built himself. Instead of the vintage commercials and ephemera we know Raymond Scott for. Three Willow Park (TWP) features numerous alternates, outtakes, demonstrations, and solo tracks that provide a first-hand encounter with the unadulterated production recordings. While the term "raw" may be applied, these tracks are full-fidelity recordings, amazingly bright and clear - even by today's standards. The beautifully packaged 3 LP set laid out a in modern vintage style, instantly transports the listener to the time and place of the contents. Each of the record sleeves featuring a different layout. Are filled with delightful Scott ephemera of the facility, instruments and daily life in the factory. The covers are just the teaser for the accompanying 20 page booklet that goes even deeper into the archives to present detailed articles on Scott's electronic music years. Arguably, one of the most important times in Raymond Scott's life. When the Electronium and other inventions matured into products for other people to use. Ultimately, opening the door to his relationship with Motown. The booklet's articles by Scott historians Irwin Chusid, Gert-Jan Blom and Jeff Winner. Accounts by celebrities Robert Moog, Tom Rhea, Herb Deutsch, Brain Kehew and others. With the addition of memories from family and friends. Provide an endearing look at Raymond Scott the artist, engineer, business man, and father. Long standing questions on his instruments are answered, myths dispelled, and new ones presented. I found my self re-reading the booklet again and again. For those who really want to know, the booklet is worth the price alone. When was the last time you put on some music and were moved emotionally by what you heard? These kinds of experiences are rare in this age of on-demand everything. Listening to the TWP tracks are a trip back in time when electronic music was still a Wild-West of sorts. Raymond's enigmatic story is especially interesting because he used audio to document what he did. The sound quality on TWP is so good, and intimate. There is an eerie presence with his gentle voice guiding the listener through the inner-workings of his creations. It feels like you are in the room with him. Production aside, it is what we hear on TWP that makes the ears dance. Spanning 2+ hours on 61 tracks. This is a literal smorgasbord of electronic works by Raymond Scott. Some will sound familiar to those who know the "Manhattan Research Inc" recordings with various alternate and outtakes. While related, the TWP collection has done a fine job of choosing contrasting versions that can be quite different from the final production versions. I got a laugh hearing an electronic version of Powerhouse used on a Domino Sugar commercial. Toy Trumpet, Pygmy War Dance, and classic commercial spots can be heard as well. Yet, those are the minority in the collection. The rest of the cuts are of new and unheard material, including some Motown recordings. These recordings not only show how Raymond Scott composed. They let us hear what many of his inventions really sounded like. The Electronium is the rightful star of the show, but we get to hear the Circle Machine, Clavivox, Bandito The Bongo Artist and others as well. His incredible creativity is immediately apparent in how he's able to configure intricate and or delicate compositions from mere beeps and boops. This was new territory at the time. Scott's vision for an electronic composition system (band) is still a model of complexity and functionality today. This is well evidenced in the many demonstrations, most under 1 minute. Scott's pieces are confidently composed, with a relaxed kind of precision that makes them sound electronic, but have a human element at the same time. Hearing what are effectively intelligent algorithms that play themselves out, musically, or not. It is still a marvel on more aesthetic levels than I will touch on in an album review. Not unlike the discovery of fractals. There's a sense that we're peering into the inner-workings of the Universe. In this regard, Scott is the Tesla of sound. A man who's life was dedicated to commanding the universal rules of sound for the good of all mankind. For your own good, be sure to get "Three Willow Park: Electronic Music from Inner Space, 1961–71" from Basta Music on June 30th. See more information on the release at the official Raymond Scott site: http://www.raymondscott.net/three-willow-park/
  12. 2 points
  13. 2 points
    Raymond Scott special on this week's Deprogramming Center broadcast. Features Scott music plus some Scott tributes, including pieces by Encyclotronic's own Jack Hertz and Jon Johnson. Live on KOWS, 12 AM Saturday (midnight Friday) USA Pacific Daylight Time here: KOWS if this appointment is inconvenient, a (p)replay is available here for the next month or so... Deprogramming Center #44
  14. 2 points
    My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts - Brian Eno + David Byrne
  15. 2 points
    until
    This is my current weekly programme. It's not entirely electronic, and some weeks may not have any at all, but it's part of the name, so has a large representation. Unfortunately, it is only an hour, so longer pieces rarely get heard, but I try to when I can. Everything from classic studio type works to current high-tech wonders, though I tend to steer away from overly beat-driven or "pop" sounding tracks. http://www.ciut.fm/shows-2/music-shows/electric-sense/
  16. 2 points
    Thanks for your reply! I tranfered really easily files to Volca FM using this web application that lets you transfer syx files to the synth online. Highly recommended! https://www.retrokits.com/rk002/settings/kfm/patches.html
  17. 2 points
    Check this out. You can see for yourself Eno can't get his DX7's to work either
  18. 2 points
    Memories From the Don Buchla Memorial Concert
  19. 2 points
    RIP Ikutaro Kakehashi, the founder of Roland.
  20. 2 points
  21. 2 points
    Take my rating with a grain of salt, as I am not a gear-head, not a synth player, and have little experience with other equipment. The MC202 is my main and only synth, used as auxiliary to my primary instrument, bass thru fx. Actually, working with this instrument over the past 15 years has taught me a lot about synthesis. Decent sounds, decent responsiveness, decent controls. More about sounds than about playing. Very useful programming and cycling. In my opinion, and in my practice, you really need to have this running into a delay pedal. This allows 2 things: -- capturing a phrase into a fairly short loop -- with the cycled playing of programmed phrases, the delay X speed of the programmed cycled part provides an Ozric-y arppeggiator where melodies synch up and produce accidental harmonies in time, either on top of itself or interwoven. This allows knob-twiddlin' and slider-play of the programmed melody arp. (Sorry if these words are meaningless and non-technical, but as I say, I'm a synth outsider. )
  22. 2 points
    Tom and Jerry: Modern Vintage Cartoon Music - Vivek Maddala Interview
  23. 2 points
    Charles Rice Goff III Biography III
  24. 1 point
    I love the IIp and the IIIp with sequencers wing. IIIp used on stage mainly by Klaus Schulze and Christopher Franke. Pict 1 : the IIIP + Seq @ Abbey Road studio (Beatles era) Pict II : a 1972 IIIp (+ Sequencers wing on the right)
  25. 1 point
    BERTHELOT & SACCOMANI Thermal Balance Of Igloo In Melting Stage CD 2003 - Digital Release 2011 http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Berthelot__Saccomani/Thermal_Balance_Of_Igloo_In_Melting_Stage/
  26. 1 point
    Robert Fripp (born 16 May 1946) is an English guitarist, composer and record producer. As a guitarist for the progressive rock band King Crimson, Fripp has been the only member to have played in all of King Crimson's line-ups from their inception in the late 1960s to the present. He has also worked extensively as a studio musician, notably with singer David Bowie on the albums "Heroes" and Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps), Brian Eno, David Sylvian and contributed sounds to the Windows Vista operating system. His complete discography lists more than seven hundred releases over four decades. He is ranked 62nd on Rolling Stone magazine's 2011 list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time after having been ranked by David Fricke 42nd on its 2003 list. Tied with Andrés Segovia, he also is ranked 47th on Gibson's Top 50 guitarists of all time. His compositions often feature unusual time signatures, which have been influenced by classical and folk traditions. His innovations include Frippertronics, soundscapes, and new standard tuning. Read more - https://www.dgmlive.com/robert-fripp
  27. 1 point
    I think that standard MIDI (serial, 31250 bps) is OK for melodic percussion instruments like mallets / keyboards, particularly for players (like me) who don't play like Gary Burton / Oscar Peterson, but more like Milt Jackson / John Lewis...for other kinds of percussion, I can see that even delays measured in milliseconds might be a problem...7 bits, 128 levels, is probably enough resolution for volume (the ear's perception of volume is less than that) but maybe not for some other parameters... df
  28. 1 point
    The story of Nonsuch's world music albums can be best summed up by David Lewiston's life story. One of the early producers of World music. He passed away in May of this year. There's an excellent memorial to him on the Nonsuch site: http://www.nonesuch.com/journal/david-lewiston-musical-explorer-dies-88-2017-05-30 For me, growing up in suburban Maryland. Nonesuch was one of the few labels that released stuff I knew I never heard before. Believe it or not, I found "Silver Apples of a Moon" at a shopping mall record store.
  29. 1 point
    An eight track, dark to experimental ambient, album, it is an array of modern world aural landscapes. From audio interpretations of an Amazonian world filled with cawing birds, dripping rain, and reptilian creatures, resonating throughout the forest (liqb, haunted and ominous), to the sounds of modern worlds both chaotic (faces, sizzle) and subdued (ghosts, umbra, curtains), the album is a perfect blend of powerful sound against minimal music!
  30. 1 point
    In a few hours you can hear from musicians who perform at festivals in Belgium and The NetherlandsDaytime in the US, so you can listen ! http://emportal.info/viewtopic.php?t=11259 (details and playlist)
  31. 1 point
    RAYMOND SCOTT (1908-1994) was one of the most prolific and central figures in 20th century music, with a career that began in the 1930s swing/big-band era, and continued through the experimental electronic music age of the 1970s. Although Scott was a famous figure during the mid-twentieth century, and currently has a dedicated cult following (that includes some of the most renowned artists in the music world), his name — not his music — remains largely unknown to the general public. But now there is a documentary film about this maverick musician, composer, inventor, and electronic music pioneer that will help raise awareness of this visionary. Deconstructing Dad tells the story of Scott’s life and career from a unique perspective, that of his only son, Stan Warnow. Raymond Scott first came to the attention of the music world on CBS radio with his innovative group the Raymond Scott Quintette in late 1936. He went on to a career that included writing music for and appearances in several Hollywood films, touring Big Bands, and in the 1940s he formed the first integrated radio orchestra — a jazz group that was a critical favorite. It included jazz greats like Coleman Hawkins and Cozy Cole. Along the way, many of his highly original musical compositions — with their characteristic sophisticated yet quirky melodies and rhythms — were licensed by Warner Bros.for their internationally famous LOONEY TUNES. If you’ve ever been entertained by the wacky antics of Bugs Bunny, or the Road Runner and Wile Coyote, you’ve almost surely heard his music. He’s been called “the man who made cartoons swing.” Later in the 1940s, he wrote the music for the Broadway musical Lute Song, which starred Yul Brynner and Mary Martin. In the 1950s he led the orchestra for Your Hit Parade, on NBC television composed several film scores, and wrote commercial jingles. But this work was minor compared to the work he was doing in the emerging field of electronic music. He had always been fascinated by the technology of music and was a highly accomplished audio engineer. From the 1950s through the 1970s he invented and refined a dazzling array of electronic musical instruments (as well as other devices like an early fax machine), that were years ahead of what was being done elsewhere. Scott’s crowning invention, The Electronium, which he described as ”an instantaneous composition and performance machine,” was purchased by Berry Gordy for Motown, and Scott worked for Motown for several years as their Director of Electronic Music Research and Development. When his years at Motown ended, he spent several more years on the Electronium and other electronic music projects, until he was crippled by a stroke in the mid-1980s which rendered him unable to work. He died in Van Nuys, California in 1994. He was married three times and fathered four children, one of whom directed this documentary. This is the official website for the film.
  32. 1 point
    The SYNTHI has a great variety of applications and it can be connected to many different kinds of electrical devices. It was designed with the following applications in mind. As a live performance instrument, connected to power amplifiers, generating its own sounds and modifying sounds from microphones. guitars. etc. As the main unit of an electronic music studio; one SYNTHI and two tape-recorders provide a flexible small studio, to which other devices can be added without difficulty. As a teaching aid the SYNTHI can demonstrate most acoustics phenomena very easily. It can be operated without risk by students, and can be used with any convenient indicating or recording device. The great flexibility of the SYNTHI comes from its basic design- unlike a television set or tape-recorder, in which the components are permanently connected to perform a specific function, the SYNTHI has about a dozen different devices which you connect together according to your particular need. The examples given in this Manual are intended to help you "get the feel" of the SYNTH!, and cover only a tiny fraction of its capabilities. In order to use the SYNTHI intelligently, it is necessary to understand what the devices do, and how several devices may be connected to work in combination. In this section the general ideas will be explained, and in the sections following these ideas will be applied to examples that you can try on the SYNTHI. The VCS3 and the SYNTHI A are very similar electrically. most of the differences being in the external design. The DK Keyboard has a similar finish to the VCS3 and the SYNTHI Keyboard is housed in a case matching the SYNTHI A for convenient transportation. The Keyboards are similar in concept but differ slightly in their controls: both are explained in It is possible to use the SYNTHI by itself, but you will probably want to use it as the basic unit of a more complex system. The SYNTHI is easily connected to almost all microphones, amplifiers, electric musical instruments and tape-recorders, and in addition there are special purpose peripherals made by E.M.S. Devices in the SYNTHI are of three basic kinds. First there is the source, or generator; this produces a signal without requiring an input, and so we represent it diagrammatically with an arrow coming out of a box. The SYNTHI has three Oscillators and a Noise Generator as its primary sources — the filter becomes a source when it is made to oscillate. and the Trapezoid output from the Envelope Shaper is also a source. The next kind of device is a treatment or process. This modifies one or more signals that are put into it. and we represent it diagrammati-cally as a box with arrows going into it and an arrow coming out of it: The Filter, Envelope Shaper. Ring Modulator, Reverberation Unit, and Amplifiers are all treat-ments on the SYNTHI. It is sometimes convenient to think of the Input Amplifiers as a "source" to the SYNTHI, but strictly they are treatments of the signal provided by a microphone, tape-recorders, etc. The third kind of device is an output device, and is the ultimate destination of the signal. Many device can be connected, such as power amplifiers, tape-recorders, other synthesizers, light-shows, etc All of these devices can be controlled by the knobs on the front of the SYNTHI. It is also possible to operate the controls electrically, and it is this fact which makes the SYNTHI so flexible. The devices themselves can turn the knobs, as it were. The SYNTHI does not distinguish Signal Voltages and Control Voltages, but a is important that you do. Typically Control Voltages are of lower frequency than Signal Voltages. It is not possible to hear sounds of frequencies lower than about 25Hz (Hz means ''oscillations per second") but a Control Voltage might be at a frequency of 8Hz (for a vibrato effect). or 1 oscillation per minute (for a slow fade). or 0Hz (i.e. constant) for a pitch determined from the keyboard. Sounds are made by connecting the devices together. In order to listen to an oscillator. we connect it to an amplifier and a loudspeaker. Although this is a very simple circuit (it requires only one pin on the patchboard of the SYNTHI) it is already capable of providing any audible pitch at a wide range of intensities —using manual control. since the Control Inputs are not connected yet.
  33. 1 point
    The EMS Synthi A, first available in May 1971, and then in March 1972 a version of it with a built-in keyboard and sequencer, the EMS Synthi AKS, a portable modular analog synthesizer made by EMS of England. Most notable for its patch pin matrix, its functions, and internal design are similar to the VCS 3 synthesizer, also made by EMS. EMS is still run by Robin Wood in Cornwall, and in addition to continuing to build and sell new units, the company repairs and refurbishes EMS equipment. The Synthi AKS has been used extensively by Brian Eno in his art rock and ambient albums. He particularly made prominent use of its signal-chain editing capability in order to add color to his own voice as well as Robert Fripp and Phil Manzanera's guitar work. His early band, Roxy Music, supposedly requested that he join them after watching him tinker with the Synthi AKS for only a few minutes. When launched in 1972, the Synthi AKS retailed for around £450. There was an optional three octave (37 note) DK1 monophonic keyboard available for it, later the DK2 (Dynamic Keyboard 2) was available, this allowed independent control of two Oscillators, thus enabling the player to play two notes together. As with the VCS3, a Synthi AKS was worth considerably more than its original price by the late 1970s. The first 30 Synthi AKs featured a black and silver Touch pad, Spin-and-touch random note selector and an unplayable resistive touch sensitive keyboard. This was replaced by the familiar blue capacitive touch sensitive keyboard with integrated sequencer.
  34. 1 point
    Wait for the little creatures to come out...
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    ASADEN Ondomo
  37. 1 point
    Manhattan Research Electronium Mk II
  38. 1 point
  39. 1 point
    Easily the best of the early lo-fi samplers. Yamaha did a great job of designing a sampler that had a lot of great features and is easy to use. Always good for hours of fun and sampling discovery. I will never sell this thing.
  40. 1 point
    Amazing to get these Patches. Thank you very much!!!
  41. 1 point
    Peavey Spectrum Bass II Classic Bass Sound Module
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    Erica Synths Black Classic System
  44. 1 point
    Before and After Science - Brian Eno
  45. 1 point
    2017 sees the release of another collaboration from Jack Hertz, this time alongside German experimental sound artist Eisenlager. `Masks' offers eight interpretations for a broad range of ceremonial, religious, theatrical and ornamental masks, with the album frequently weaving ancient old-world elements with modern electronic styles, making for a varied but surprisingly coherent collection of ambient, prog-electronic, electronica and drone experimentation over field recording sound collages. `Zangbeto', traditional voodoo guardians of the night, is a drowsy tribal chant over lurching beats, `Avatar', a graphical representation of a computer user's alter ego or character is unsurprisingly modern slinking electronica, and `Topeng', a dramatic form of Indonesian dance blends twitching looping electronics to bring a gamelan-like hypnotic quality. `Batak' grafts chilled panning beats to shivering Steve Roach-like outreaching ambient pools, the drowsy `Skin-Walker' crosses murky beats with violent electronic slivers, and `Death' is an eerie and subtly consuming machine drone that never becomes completely pitch-black. Low-key acoustic strums pervade the disorientating droning drifts of `Gas', and `Ngil' is a surreal dark ambient closer full of unease, with ebbing dozy washes lapping around pulsing beats that skitter in and out of the darkly psychedelic atmosphere. The duo here have crafted a completely fascinating work for the Aural Films label with a cool concept that allowed them to offer a very colourful and eclectic range of interpretations of their source material. `Masks' also sees the artists at a good middle ground, with many pieces reasonably accessible without being vaguely commercial, yet always remaining intelligent and challenging, but nor is it as uncompromising or difficult to get your head around as might have been expected. Open minded electronic fans should definitely look into this diverse collection, and let's hope for more collaborations on this subject between Hertz and Eisenlager in the future, as it seems like they've just scratched the surface here! Four stars. (This review first appeared on the Prog Archives site on the 28th February 2017)
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    A bit of midnight noodling with the 0-Coast and KP3. They compliment each nicely for effects, loops, tempo control, and you can use the pad motion for MIDI B modulation.
  48. 1 point
  49. 1 point
    Waldorf Blofeld Synthesizer Desktop
  50. 1 point
    Dave Smith Instruments Prophet 6 Desktop