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    Great pack, instantly wrote a little jam with my FM Volca.
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    A heavy dose of kosmische is in the new "Bergen" video from FAST RAILS.
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    (No Pussyfooting) is the debut studio album by the British musicians Robert Fripp and Brian Eno (credited as Fripp & Eno). The album was released in 1973. (No Pussyfooting) was the first of three major collaborations between the musicians, growing out of Eno's early tape recording loop experiments and Fripp's "Frippertronics" electric guitar technique. Brian Eno invited Robert Fripp to his London home studio in September 1972. Eno was experimenting with a tape system developed by Terry Riley and Pauline Oliveros where two reel-to-reel tape recorders were set up side-by side. Sounds recorded on the first deck would be played back by the second deck, and then routed back into the first deck to create a long looping tape delay. Fripp played guitar over Eno's loops, while Eno selectively looped or recorded Fripp's guitar without looping it. The result is a dense, multi-layered piece of ambient music. This technique later came to be known as "Frippertronics". (No Pussyfooting) 's first track, which fills one side, is a 21-minute piece titled "The Heavenly Music Corporation". Fripp originally wanted the track titled "The Transcendental Music Corporation", which Eno didn't allow as he feared it would make people "think they were serious". It was recorded in two takes, first creating the background looping track, then adding an extended non-looped guitar solo over the backing track. This track features Fripp's electric guitar as the sole sound source. The second track "Swastika Girls", which fills the other side, was recorded almost a year after "The Heavenly Music Corporation" in August 1973 at Command Studios at 201 Piccadilly in London. The track employed the same technique as "The Heavenly Music Corporation" except Fripp played to a background electronic loop created by Eno on VCS3. Fripp and Eno took the tapes of "Swastika Girls" to British record producer George Martin's Air Studios at Oxford Circus to continue mixing and assembling the track there.[6] The track's title refers to an image of nude women performing a Nazi salute that was ripped from a discarded pornographic film magazine found by Eno at AIR studios. Eno stuck the image on the recording console while recording the track with Fripp and it became the title of the track. (No Pussyfooting) was released in November 1973 and failed to chart on either the American or British charts. It was met with negative reaction from the record label itself, Island Records, who were actively opposed to it. The album was released in the same year as Eno's more rock-based solo album Here Come the Warm Jets. Eno was attempting to launch a solo career, having just left Roxy Music, and his management bemoaned the confusion caused by the release of two albums with such different styles. Robert Fripp's bandmates in King Crimson also disliked the album. The mainstream rock press also did not pay the album much attention compared to Fripp's work with King Crimson and to Eno's solo album. In the UK, the album was released at a large discount compared to normal album prices and was regarded as something of a musical novelty.
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    George Orwell Meets 2017's USA Ride The Train Of Dissonance To "Untopia" Our hero, Glarmen Glamours, takes on today's Big Brother with sound collage and dramatic electro-acoustical vigor. Curious? Click the Pic Below and Go: Untopia The first review is already in (quote Gerbil Bliss...) The perfect soundtrack to Washington crazy. Tired of trying to apply logic to the sh*t going down in our federal and state governments? Here's a soundtrack of a response. The Universe help us all! Enjoy while we still have an open Title II regulated Internet.
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    This is the album I have been waiting for. The new material featuring outtakes and isolated tracks, pulls back the curtains to reveal the master at work. Up there with the IBM computer singing "Daisy", the world's first Artificial Intelligence music generator can be heard under the command of Raymond Scott himself. Hearing what the Electronium really sounded like in action gave me goosebumps. These are the moments avid listeners live for. Rare they may be in this day and age, the new release from Basta Music, "Three Willow Park: Electronic Music from Inner Space, 1961–71" delivers many of these moments. The follow-up to the 2000 "Manhattan Research Inc." album that effectively turned the world onto Raymond Scott. This new release takes a closer look at the man and his instruments, especially the Electronium. The music and accompanying book are some of the most detailed examinations of Raymond's electronic "sidemen", that he designed and built himself. Instead of the vintage commercials and ephemera we know Raymond Scott for. Three Willow Park (TWP) features numerous alternates, outtakes, demonstrations, and solo tracks that provide a first-hand encounter with the unadulterated production recordings. While the term "raw" may be applied, these tracks are full-fidelity recordings, amazingly bright and clear - even by today's standards. The beautifully packaged 3 LP set laid out a in modern vintage style, instantly transports the listener to the time and place of the contents. Each of the record sleeves featuring a different layout. Are filled with delightful Scott ephemera of the facility, instruments and daily life in the factory. The covers are just the teaser for the accompanying 20 page booklet that goes even deeper into the archives to present detailed articles on Scott's electronic music years. Arguably, one of the most important times in Raymond Scott's life. When the Electronium and other inventions matured into products for other people to use. Ultimately, opening the door to his relationship with Motown. The booklet's articles by Scott historians Irwin Chusid, Gert-Jan Blom and Jeff Winner. Accounts by celebrities Robert Moog, Tom Rhea, Herb Deutsch, Brain Kehew and others. With the addition of memories from family and friends. Provide an endearing look at Raymond Scott the artist, engineer, business man, and father. Long standing questions on his instruments are answered, myths dispelled, and new ones presented. I found my self re-reading the booklet again and again. For those who really want to know, the booklet is worth the price alone. When was the last time you put on some music and were moved emotionally by what you heard? These kinds of experiences are rare in this age of on-demand everything. Listening to the TWP tracks are a trip back in time when electronic music was still a Wild-West of sorts. Raymond's enigmatic story is especially interesting because he used audio to document what he did. The sound quality on TWP is so good, and intimate. There is an eerie presence with his gentle voice guiding the listener through the inner-workings of his creations. It feels like you are in the room with him. Production aside, it is what we hear on TWP that makes the ears dance. Spanning 2+ hours on 61 tracks. This is a literal smorgasbord of electronic works by Raymond Scott. Some will sound familiar to those who know the "Manhattan Research Inc" recordings with various alternate and outtakes. While related, the TWP collection has done a fine job of choosing contrasting versions that can be quite different from the final production versions. I got a laugh hearing an electronic version of Powerhouse used on a Domino Sugar commercial. Toy Trumpet, Pygmy War Dance, and classic commercial spots can be heard as well. Yet, those are the minority in the collection. The rest of the cuts are of new and unheard material, including some Motown recordings. These recordings not only show how Raymond Scott composed. They let us hear what many of his inventions really sounded like. The Electronium is the rightful star of the show, but we get to hear the Circle Machine, Clavivox, Bandito The Bongo Artist and others as well. His incredible creativity is immediately apparent in how he's able to configure intricate and or delicate compositions from mere beeps and boops. This was new territory at the time. Scott's vision for an electronic composition system (band) is still a model of complexity and functionality today. This is well evidenced in the many demonstrations, most under 1 minute. Scott's pieces are confidently composed, with a relaxed kind of precision that makes them sound electronic, but have a human element at the same time. Hearing what are effectively intelligent algorithms that play themselves out, musically, or not. It is still a marvel on more aesthetic levels than I will touch on in an album review. Not unlike the discovery of fractals. There's a sense that we're peering into the inner-workings of the Universe. In this regard, Scott is the Tesla of sound. A man who's life was dedicated to commanding the universal rules of sound for the good of all mankind. For your own good, be sure to get "Three Willow Park: Electronic Music from Inner Space, 1961–71" from Basta Music on June 30th. See more information on the release at the official Raymond Scott site: http://www.raymondscott.net/three-willow-park/
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    Raymond Scott special on this week's Deprogramming Center broadcast. Features Scott music plus some Scott tributes, including pieces by Encyclotronic's own Jack Hertz and Jon Johnson. Live on KOWS, 12 AM Saturday (midnight Friday) USA Pacific Daylight Time here: KOWS if this appointment is inconvenient, a (p)replay is available here for the next month or so... Deprogramming Center #44
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    My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts - Brian Eno + David Byrne
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    until
    This is my current weekly programme. It's not entirely electronic, and some weeks may not have any at all, but it's part of the name, so has a large representation. Unfortunately, it is only an hour, so longer pieces rarely get heard, but I try to when I can. Everything from classic studio type works to current high-tech wonders, though I tend to steer away from overly beat-driven or "pop" sounding tracks. http://www.ciut.fm/shows-2/music-shows/electric-sense/
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    Thanks for your reply! I tranfered really easily files to Volca FM using this web application that lets you transfer syx files to the synth online. Highly recommended! https://www.retrokits.com/rk002/settings/kfm/patches.html
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    Check this out. You can see for yourself Eno can't get his DX7's to work either
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    Memories From the Don Buchla Memorial Concert
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    RIP Ikutaro Kakehashi, the founder of Roland.
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    I'm back! Greetings all
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    Take my rating with a grain of salt, as I am not a gear-head, not a synth player, and have little experience with other equipment. The MC202 is my main and only synth, used as auxiliary to my primary instrument, bass thru fx. Actually, working with this instrument over the past 15 years has taught me a lot about synthesis. Decent sounds, decent responsiveness, decent controls. More about sounds than about playing. Very useful programming and cycling. In my opinion, and in my practice, you really need to have this running into a delay pedal. This allows 2 things: -- capturing a phrase into a fairly short loop -- with the cycled playing of programmed phrases, the delay X speed of the programmed cycled part provides an Ozric-y arppeggiator where melodies synch up and produce accidental harmonies in time, either on top of itself or interwoven. This allows knob-twiddlin' and slider-play of the programmed melody arp. (Sorry if these words are meaningless and non-technical, but as I say, I'm a synth outsider. )
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    Tom and Jerry: Modern Vintage Cartoon Music - Vivek Maddala Interview
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    I guess you know that Mr. Hillage has just released a big box set which includes some unreleased System 7 stuff as well as a lot of older recordings, live stuff, remixes, etc. A few weeks back I tuned into this live interview on he did (two hours) on a little British radio station. I believe the full show is available on the link below for anyone interested, includes him playing music from people who have influenced him and lots of stuff from the box set: https://beta.mixcloud.com/interestin...llage-special/ (I hope this link still works... like I said, I heard it as it happened...) Keep up the good work, Jon, you've been sharing lots of interesting music here of late.
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    Suzanne Ciani - Buchla Concerts 1975
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    New Maps Of Hell - Paul Schutze
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    Hi, I am new to the encyclotronic community and I am very happy to be here.
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    until
    Soldiers of Undeclared Wars. Veterans of Asphalt and Broken Glass. Field Nurses from North of Page. An album done, essentially, in the "New Industrial" style ,excepting the synthesizers in Frore's piece and a drone texture in the final piece. Thanks to Jack Hertz for the sounds on "Untitled" and Frore for his work on the Third Track. "Being places for masses of people to work and survive, cities involve a depersonalizing quality. That is necessary, as the resources of the urban environment have to function for a broad spectrum of people with different needs. The bus has to work for us all (or as many as is possible), the courthouse must allow us to pass through and have our say and experience, and since we are all involved, not one of us particularly is, but us as a community. Hence the depersonalization. A new industrial music should capture this effect as well, being similarly accessible to many people, and similarly abstract or non-emotive." -- Thomas Park, "A Manifesto For 'The New Industrial' Music", 2016 https://archive.org/details/SalvationArmy
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    Genre Party by Charles Rice Goff III
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    The guy has a room full of gear, replaced by the lil' ol Phenol
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    You van check out my programs on the Concerzender here: http://www.concertzender.nl/?s=Roland+Kuit+
  34. 2 points
    Free-- samples of the Earth's sonic discharges (sferics): https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sferics-samples
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    Happy Black Friday. "Don't Believe The Hype" https://jonjohnson1.bandcamp.com/track/panic-button
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    If you live in Central PA (as in, near Bloomsburg/Danville/Lewisburg), then please check out our Meetup group: https://www.meetup.com/Susquehanna-Experimental-Music-Sound/
  37. 1 point
    I was very lucky in 1995 to spend a weekend with Mamady Keita and troupe studying traditional West African djembe music. After just two days, my lead djembe playing went to the next level. Mamady has become quite the ambassador for the djembe worldwide.
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    RAYMOND SCOTT (1908-1994) was one of the most prolific and central figures in 20th century music, with a career that began in the 1930s swing/big-band era, and continued through the experimental electronic music age of the 1970s. Although Scott was a famous figure during the mid-twentieth century, and currently has a dedicated cult following (that includes some of the most renowned artists in the music world), his name — not his music — remains largely unknown to the general public. But now there is a documentary film about this maverick musician, composer, inventor, and electronic music pioneer that will help raise awareness of this visionary. Deconstructing Dad tells the story of Scott’s life and career from a unique perspective, that of his only son, Stan Warnow. Raymond Scott first came to the attention of the music world on CBS radio with his innovative group the Raymond Scott Quintette in late 1936. He went on to a career that included writing music for and appearances in several Hollywood films, touring Big Bands, and in the 1940s he formed the first integrated radio orchestra — a jazz group that was a critical favorite. It included jazz greats like Coleman Hawkins and Cozy Cole. Along the way, many of his highly original musical compositions — with their characteristic sophisticated yet quirky melodies and rhythms — were licensed by Warner Bros.for their internationally famous LOONEY TUNES. If you’ve ever been entertained by the wacky antics of Bugs Bunny, or the Road Runner and Wile Coyote, you’ve almost surely heard his music. He’s been called “the man who made cartoons swing.” Later in the 1940s, he wrote the music for the Broadway musical Lute Song, which starred Yul Brynner and Mary Martin. In the 1950s he led the orchestra for Your Hit Parade, on NBC television composed several film scores, and wrote commercial jingles. But this work was minor compared to the work he was doing in the emerging field of electronic music. He had always been fascinated by the technology of music and was a highly accomplished audio engineer. From the 1950s through the 1970s he invented and refined a dazzling array of electronic musical instruments (as well as other devices like an early fax machine), that were years ahead of what was being done elsewhere. Scott’s crowning invention, The Electronium, which he described as ”an instantaneous composition and performance machine,” was purchased by Berry Gordy for Motown, and Scott worked for Motown for several years as their Director of Electronic Music Research and Development. When his years at Motown ended, he spent several more years on the Electronium and other electronic music projects, until he was crippled by a stroke in the mid-1980s which rendered him unable to work. He died in Van Nuys, California in 1994. He was married three times and fathered four children, one of whom directed this documentary. This is the official website for the film.
  39. 1 point
    To convert this file to a standard DX7 voice bank, extract 4104 bytes from address 0xAA.
  40. 1 point
    Joh Mustad AB IE-50 Tubon Bass Synthesizer
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    I saw the world premier of Compassion when TR played a benefit with the Tubes at Bimbos in SF in late 1980. It was just a month or two before this show that Rundgren had been robbed in his home, tied up by the robbers as they picked over his stuff, humming "I Saw The Light." I've always thought that the Healing album was created as a salve for the wounds suffered during this incident. If it had been me going through all this, I'm sure I would have created an album to help sooth the pain...
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    Wolf's Hole - mutanT.R.I.
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    EARS - Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith
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    I think in heaven they'd all be wired--power, audio, midi, wifi, etc.-- so you can just go over and play and not have to worry about the electric bill, depleting energy resources or contributing to the toxicity of the environment via energy production . . . . Hmmmmmm. Maybe it's already like that and you don't need wires and electricity! 8-[)>
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    Go Play! https://ia601505.us.archive.org/13/items/jack-in-a-bok/player.html
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    Ambient Sleeping Pill is a wonderfully curated online radio station. Very consistent in mood and tone. Tune in here: http://ambientsleepingpill.com/
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    I had the fortune of attending one of her listening lecturethings about 20 years ago. It was held in an old church in downtown Kansas City -- free of charge, a rare chance to interact with some of the few lovers of sound and sonic experiments here in the KC area too. All good. Somewhere in my house I have a cassette tape that retains a bit of that whole experience too -- now to the search...