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Jon Johnson

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  1. Jon Johnson

    Roland JD-800 Programmable Synthesizer

    Today, fewer and fewer people actually create their own sounds, and simply play presets or sounds created by programmers. However, the original purpose of the synthesizer was to "create sound". It's easy to simply select a preset you like, but that sound will always be "someone else's sound". We at Roland asked, "Why don't we return to the roots of synthesis; the enjoyment of creating original sounds?" We considered many different ways in which we could bring back the fun of creating sounds, and the result is the JD-800 before you. "Creating sounds" may seem like a highly technical process, but it's actually just a matter of moving a slider to make the sound change! This is easy for anyone, and the sounds that you get will always be your very own. The JD-800 is designed to make it fun to create sounds. So please go ahead and move those sliders! We hope you will make lots of different sounds; original sounds with which to play your original music. The JD-800 is a digital synthesizer that uses leading-edge digital technology in conjunction with Roland’s analog synthesizer expertise. Some of its main features are as follows. High-quality sound source The JD-800 uses a PCM sound source which contains 108 different types of PCM waveforms including sawtooth waves, pulse waves, noise waveforms, one~shot waveforms, and looped waveforms. Additional waveforms can be loaded from a WAVEFORM card (SL-JD series; separately sold). Furthermore, these PCM waveforms can be processed by filters to provide an extremely wide variety of sound-creation possibilities. Front panel design for intuitive sound creation The JD-800 provides front panel controls for all basic Tone parameters, bringing an analog type interface to a digital synthesizer. Since parameter controls are arranged in the order of signal flow, the sound shaping process is easy to understand. You can also adjust the sound parameters in realtime as you perform. On—board effects processor The JD-800 has an on-board DSP (Digital Signal Processor) that provides a wide variety of effects. in Single mode, you have eight different digital effects; a three-band equalizer for each Patch, and also distortion, enhancer, phaser, spectrum, delay, chorus, and reverb. ln Multi mode, you have four different digital effects; a three-band equalizer for each Patch, and also chorus, delay, and reverb. You can specify how the effect will be applied to each of the five Parts and the Special Part. Two play modes ; Single and Multi The JD-800 has two play modes; Single and Multi. ln Single mode, the entire JD-800 plays a single Patch. This mode is appropriate when you are playing solo parts. In Multi mode, the JD-800 functions as a multi-timbral sound source with five Synth Parts and a Special Part. When used with a sequencer or MTR, this mode allows the JD-800 to simultaneously play all the parts of an ensemble. External expansion The JD~800 has two card slots; DATA card (M—256E, sold separately) and WAVEFORM card (SL-JD series, sold separately). When a DATA card is inserted, you can select from a total of 128 Patches, including the 64 internal Patches. If a WAVEFORM card is used, you can also create sounds using PCM waveforms from the card. Roland later released 8 add on cards for the JD 800: SL-JD80-01 Drums & Percussion STANDARD SL-JD80-02 Drums & Percussion DANCE SL-JD80-03 Rock Drums SL-JD80-04 Strings Ensemble SL-JD80-05 Brass Section SL-JD80-06 Grand Piano SL-JD80-07 Guitar Collection SL-JD80-08 Accordion
  2. Jon Johnson

    EMS Synthi E DKE Educational Synthesizer

    Designed by Tim Orr at Electronic Music Studios. The Synthi E is a low cost "Educational" synthesizer in briefcase format with optional Synthi DKE 3 octave keyboard. The instrument also has a built in speaker for monitoring the system audio.
  3. Jon Johnson

    AVP Synth MAD-5 mk2

    MAD-5 mk2 is an analog drum synthesizer which is inspired by the sounds of the 20th century soviet drum machines while having the flexibility, MIDI control and compact package of the 21st century. It consists of 22 knobs and 1 button which allows you to manipulate/control the sound and midi. It also has individual outputs for each of the five drum instruments so you can easily rout and process them separately with your external effects especially in a live configuration. The MAD-5 mk2 uses all analog synthesis method: five instruments consisting of bass drum, snare drum, open hat, close hat, clap. It also features 4 noise generators for snare drum, open hat, close hat and clap. Specification — The method of synthesis: 100% analog synthesis; — Drum instruments: 5 — bass drum (BD), snare drum (SD), open hat (OH), close hat (CH), clap (CL); — MIDI interface: MIDI IN — 16 channels (MIDI learn), MIDI THRU; — Audio outputs: one mix output (mono 6.3mm jack) and five individual outputs (mono 6.3mm jack); — Trigger inputs: 5 trigger inputs for every drum instrument (mono 3.5mm jack); — Controls: 22 knobs and 1 button; — External power supply: adapter 15 VAC (included)* — Steel case; — Dimensions: L190хW162хH91 mm; — Weight: 1.26 kg.
  4. In 2000 the original team of Synton creators closed out their Fenix Modular Synthesizer production and in 2009 a waiting was made available to interested buyers that there was to be a Fenix II and it's optional Fenix III Sequencer. Production began in 2010 with some of the specs of the original Fenix still part of the newer system. A limited number of 75 Fenix II's were made and 25 Fenix III Sequencers were sold to buyers.
  5. Jon Johnson

    Korg Electribe Music Production Station

    The electribe has been reborn including KORG's latest technology distilled from popular products such as the KingKORG, kaossilator, kaoss pad, and taktile. An evolved step sequencer Using the 16 pads placed on the front of the unit, you can create patterns intuitively while actually hearing and seeing the sounds. You can use the pads as a keyboard to realtime-record phrases, and also perform step recording by entering the pitch and rhythmic value one note at a time. The patterns you create can be used in alternate forms as you perform by taking advantage of the "step jump" feature inherited from the volca series, or by changing the "last step" to vary the length of each part. There's also a "motion sequence" function that lets you record knob and button operations and use them in the pattern that you create. Either drums or synths can now be assigned to each of the 16 parts (i.e., the 16 pads). For example you could create complex rhythms by assigning drums to all of the 16 parts. Intuitive beat making with the Trigger pads and Touch pad Familiar from the kaossilator is the "touch scale" function that lets anyone perform without wrong notes, just by moving a finger across the touch pad. The trigger pads that were popular on the taktile are also provided, making it easy for anyone to create phrases intuitively. The trigger pads can also be used for drum input. Settings allow you to switch velocity on/off. A synth engine that allows the fastest sound production For the electribe, KORG designed a synth engine that gives you the maximum sound-creating freedom and the fastest sound production. The 409 oscillator waveforms include analog modeling and PCM. The analog modeling synth engine provides a broad variety ranging from simple basic waveforms to complex combinations such as dual, unison, sync, ring modulation, and cross modulation. The PCM sound engine provides mainly rhythm sounds, but also covers multisamples for keyboard. (collaborations with Sample Magic, Loopmasters, Prime Loops are included) The filters at the heart of the sound-shaping capabilities are inherited directly from the KingKORG, and they use filter algorithms that simulate standard synthesizers so that you can get "the sound" which was used in famous songs, just by selecting the appropriate filter type. You can also apply filters to drums to create rhythm tracks that are rich in tonal variation. Modulation can make sound-creation more complicated, but we've made it easy by condensing it down to three parameters: simply select a template that specifies an effect and its target, and then adjust the speed and depth of the effect to suit your taste. Even deeper creative potential: Effects and Groove templates The new electribe provides effects such as compression and overdrive for each part, giving you uncompromising control over the nuances of individual sounds that differ subtly between genres. The groove function can be specified for each part, letting you apply a groove to your phrase simply by selecting a template. New functions for live performance: Master effects, Pattern sets, Sync in/out The master effects can be controlled from the touch pad just like on the kaoss pad, and they include not only spatial-type effects that shape the overall acoustics but they also include effects that apply aggressively musical transformations such as the "Vinyl Break" effect inherited from the Kaoss pad series, and the newly developed "Seq Reverse" and "Odd Stepper" that change the playback order of the sequencer. These are also extremely effective for live performance. Insert effects can be assigned for individual parts, opening up even more complex sound-design possibilities. There's also a "pattern set" function which lets you switch patterns by pressing trigger pads, and an "event recording" function that records that performance. In addition to MIDI IN/OUT, "Sync IN/OUT" is also provided, allowing synchronized performances with the volca series, monotribe, or MS-20 mini. The unit can run on six AA batteries, so you can easily take it along with you and perform anywhere, providing on-the-go inspiration your musical ideas. A new workflow with Ableton Live Transform inspiration into a creative production. KORG has collaborated with Ableton to offer a new music production workflow that combines the best of hardware and software. The electribe can internally save and export patterns in Ableton Live format. Individual patterns and parts are saved as scenes and clips in an Ableton Live Set. Use Live’s powerful Session and Arrangement workflows to edit and and refine your ideas, perform or record new parts, arrange your ideas, and mix your song. The Korg electribe includes Live Lite.
  6. Jon Johnson

    Keytek CTS 2000

    Originally made by Italian synth maker Siel. The Keytek CTS 2000 is a digital synthesizer with analog resonant filters. It has 2 oscillators per voice with 8 voices and analogue CEM 3389 filters. The same as in the Waldorf Microwave I. Additionally it features Cross Table Synthesis which is described as wavetable synthesis with 333 digitally sampled waveforms. You can control up to 6 wavetables per voice with complete analog processing for each voice including 24db per octave filter. 2 envelope generators with up to 5 parameters and 3 LFO's. 6 data entry slider for real time editing of all parameters.
  7. Jon Johnson

    Siel DK600

    The SIEL DK600 is six voice analog synthesizer with digitally controlled oscillators. The DK600 is a programmable polyphonic synthesizer, featuring 6 voices with 2 DCO's each and keyboard dynamic control. Its 95 programs offer an extremely wide sonority range. The 12 Digitally Controlled Oscillators (DCO) make it possible for you to create no end of synthesized sounds with an excellent pitch stability (no special tuning required). A digital/analog converter, combined with 3 Low Frequency Oscillators (LFO), enables impressive modulations and a very rich and "fat" sound. DK 600 is a superb synthesis of both technical knowledge and musical experience. The controls layout enables simple real-time adjustment of all parameters and offers an immediate visual indication of operation in current program. The programmable dynamic envelope generator makes it possible for you to control both the Attack Time and the A.D.S.R. destination (filter, amplifier, or both) for advanced sound possibilities. Moreover, MIDI. connection allows you to hook the DK 600 together with any MIDI. equipped synthesizer or sequencer. MIDI. standard may be adopted also for interconnection to computers. The DK600 was released in the midst of the era of the Oberheim Matrix 12 and Roland Juno 106 which were both formidable competitors. However the Siel DK600 had dual oscillators per voice which enabled it to sound thicker than it's competitors because of its six voices having two oscillators per voice made it have 12 oscillators.
  8. Jon Johnson

    Novation Supernova II

    The SuperNova II (2000) was available in 24, 36 and 48-voice models with additional 12 or 24-voice expansion boards. Available again in a 3U rack-mount format, the SuperNova II was also available in a 61-note performance keyboard version with velocity and aftertouch, enabling sound tweaking during live performance. FM synthesis capability was included along with ring modulation, dual analogue inputs and a 42-band vocoder. An 8-part arpeggiator was also on-board and in its full version the product offered 8-part multitimbrality and 48-voice polyphony, with 57 and 2304 oscillators running simultaneously.
  9. Jon Johnson

    Novation Super Bass Station

    In addition to it's original architecture there were now separate ADSR's for the filter and envelope. A key follow effect was added to filter section. An Sample and Hold sub oscillator, noise generator, a ring mod effect, and, a mixer section for balancing all sound sources.
  10. Jon Johnson

    Quasimidi PolyMorph Module

    By integrating the Morphing Sequencers with it's expressive synthesizer engine the Quasimidi Polymorph a sophisticated instrument with many complex features and facilities. The Polymorph is 4 part/4 synth sequencer/drum machine and an 8 to 16 voice synthesizer featuring Quasismidi's ANALOG EMULATION SYNTHESIS as well as sampled waveforms with a noise generator. the synth parts can have 3 oscillators each or to share polyphony parts can be 2 oscillators per voice. The instrument also includes 4 independent effect blocks for each part and a memory of 128 programs and 64 performances.
  11. Jon Johnson

    ESTRADIN SOLARIS 314

    EMR "Solaris" (Estradin -314) - Polyphonic body has clear sound, allows us to achieve a very soft and very sonorous tones. It has 49 keys, with five registers transitions 1 ', 2', 2 1/2 ', 4', 8 '; function glissando - a: downhill 2 octaves down (serves as compensation for the absence of the second manual); setting a range of 1.5 pitch. Brilliance - a function which increases the overall brightness of the sound in all registers, operates independently of the other settings. Filter Sliders meet the following standards: Stress - Envelope. Band - Cutoff. Brightness - resonance. Attack, damping pedestal, sustain. Functions vibrato tone modulated frequency oscillations (frequency) and envelope (timbre). Pedal - volume. Output- Line Out.
  12. Jon Johnson

    Opera 6 Version 3

    Version 3 of the Opera 6 from Siel features 6 voices with 12 Voltage Controlled Oscillators and is very similar in look and style as the original and Version 2. This time still with blue casing, and pitch and mod wheels, but without the two buttons between them found on Version 2. The newest and biggest change was the unit now featured 12 Digitally Controlled Oscillators. The instrument still offered 6 voices. Version 2 of the Opera 6 from Siel featured 6 voices with 12 Voltage Controlled Oscillators and is very similar in look and style as the original with a new blue casing, pitch and mod wheels, and repositioned buttons allowing more space for the user to perform functions. The synthesizer's architecture is still a 6 voice unit with 12 voltage controlled featuring square and saw waveforms with pulse width modulation. The Opera 6 has MIDI note on/off with velocity and program change only. Backups could be performed over MIDI as well and also tape backup is available. A pitch wheel was added alongside the original's mod single wheel.
  13. Jon Johnson

    Korg DS-8 FM Synthesizer

    The Korg DS-8 is an expandable FM synthesizer released by KORG in 1986 which used the Yamaha FM synthesis engine with 2-Op oscillators. 61 Keys in length with both initial and switchable aftertouch capabilities it stores up to 100 programs and 10 combinations in its internal memory. By using one of the optional non-volatile (but battery-powered) KORG RAM cards MCR-01, MCR-02, or MCR-03 this program memory can be expanded by extra programs and combinations: 100/10 for the MCR-01, 200/20 for the MCR-02, or 400/40 for the MCR-03. Programs can be backed up and received via standard MIDI dumps. The DS-8 features one joystick controller for bending pitch, timbre and modulation speed, one card slot for aforementioned KORG RAM Cards, MIDI IN/OUT/THRU jacks, a damper pedal, assignable pedal, assignable switch, program up pedal, one balance slider, four keyboard modes (Single, Layer, Double and Multi) and two slider controls which indicate the ability to edit the two oscillators from fast to slow. The three editable banks shown on the right side of the board (Function, Voice Parameter and Combi Parameter) provide multiple ways in which the user can edit the programs, banks and patches. At $1400 RRP the DS-8 was a revolutionary, cheap and affordable product for its time.
  14. Jon Johnson

    Cosmic Furnace - Roger Powell

    Roger Powell debuted in 1973 with an overlooked solo release, Cosmic Furnace, and soon after, was invited by Rundgren to join up with the recently formed Utopia. Powell's debut with Utopia was on their second release, 1975's Another Live, which led to further work on Rundgren solo albums (1975's Initiation, 1976's Faithful, and 1978's in-concert Back to the Bars), as well as another prog rock-based Utopia release, 1977's RA. Wounded Bird. 2005.
  15. Jon Johnson

    Moog Micromoog

    The Moog Micromoog is a single-oscillator monophonic synthesizer. Considered a budget synth alternative to the Minimoog with unique features like a ribbon controller and an early form of something like MIDI called Open System that allowed Moog synthesizers to connect and play together. It features 32 keys with audio processing through it's filter and VCA. Moog Promotional Copy You may have thought of owning a Moog synthesizer someday. But. you may also have thought it costs too much, or that it's hard to play. Wrong. Especially now, with the advent of the Micromoog. It's easy to buy. And easy to play. $695 suggested list. And it's every inch a Moog. With that patented, "fat" Moog sound, and all the smooth, playable features people buy Moons for. Plus a few new ones. Like the built-in ribbon controller. Slide your finger up the ribbon and the pitch slides up. Slide it down, the pitch slides down. And the sound snaps back to the key you're playing the moment you re-lease your finger. It's a simple little work of genius that lets you duplicate the blues guitar bend, the trombone slide. or the violin vibrato, not to mention your own unique expressions. Pitch drift is a thing of the past with this synthesizer because the Micromoog won't go out of tune. It has an oscillator control circuit that maintains it-self precisely at 130° F (55° C). No matter what the temperature is on stage. But the Moog features don't stop here. There's "noise" control for making drums, cymbals, steam engines and thunderstorms. Fully variable wave shape to get right down to the harmonic structure of sound. Rapid filter modulation for dinner bells, church bells, tubular bells. An eight octave range. Built-in sample and hold. Arid a lot more you'll discover when you visit your Moog dealer. All this brings us to the most important point - freedom of expression. And all for $695 suggested list.
  16. Jon Johnson

    Moog The Source

    The Source is a monophonic analog synthesizer with 2 oscillators and noise generator, filter and 2 envelope generators. One for the amplifier and one for the filter. 37-note keyboard with modulation and pitch wheels. Each oscillator offers saw, triangle, and, square waves.The square weave can be adjusted for pulse-wave.They were still the familiar Moog oscillators but under digital control offering more solid stability. The sound of the Moog Source is said to be "fat" as any of their analog gear before it. The newer, cleaner interface points to Moog's insight at knowing where the market was headed for synthesizers. Moog Promotional Copy THE SOURCE is a microprocessor-controlled, programmable monophonic synthesizer from Moog Music. A unique touch panel and a master incremental control are used to store the setting of each section of the synthesizer in memory. where up to 16 presets may be instantly recalled. Sound sources consist of two audio oscillators and a noise source. The oscillators range from 32' to 1' and can produce sawtooth, triangular, and variable rectangular waveforms. Oscillator 2 may be synchronized to Oscillator 1, producing additional waveforms. The Moog • filter and voltage controlled amplifier are controlled by individual microprocessor-generated four-part contour generators. The oscillators and filter may be controlled by a low-frequency oscillator which produces triangular and square waves. Performance controls consist of pitch and modulation wheels and single or multiple triggering controls. Interface ports allow input and output of control voltages and triggers. The microprocessor allows saving and loading preset sounds with a standard audio tape recorder. The microprocessor controls a software-generated sequencer (two reel-time sequences of up to 64 notes), an arpeggiator with timing discrimination, automatic triggering, and soft-ware-generated sample + hold, routed to the oscillators and/ or filter. These controls are accessed by a second-level entry system.
  17. Jon Johnson

    Waldorf Microwave XT

    The Microwave is still is one of the best choices when you’re looking for that unusual and cut-through sound. It’s all in Waldorf’s wavetable synthesis, which is behind the success of the legendary PPG synthesizers, the Waldorf Microwave I and of course the Wave – a dream-machine in its own right. About Wavetable Synthesis Basics The sound generation of the MicroWave II/XT/XTk is based on wavetable synthesis. This type of synthesis combines analog access and digital flexibility in a simple way. Although wavetable synthesis is a form of "sample playback" in principle, you should avoid this term because functionality, operation and results are totally different. The ROM area of the MicroWave II/XT/XTk currently consists of 65 wavetables, 31 locations are reserved for future ROM wavetables. The RAM area contains 32 user wavetables, which can be manipulated over MIDI via appropriate computer software. A wavetable is a list made up of 64 entries. Each entry represents one wave, that can be either located in the ROM or RAM area of the MicroWave II/XT/XTk or calculated by an algorithm after selecting the wavetable. For the purpose of using a wavetable inside a sound program, it doesn’t matter what source the wavetable comes from. A wavetable itself contains no wave data, but is in fact a collection of up to 64 entries referencing up to 64 waves. Not all entries of the wavetable have to contain entries. When one or several sequential entries contain no reference, the MicroWave II/XT/XTk calculates the waves for these locations automatically. The algorithm producing these "imaginary" waves uses an interpolation scheme that crossfades the "real" ones. E.g. when a wavetable contains entries in entry 95 RwkdTNpg8 1 and 5, the positions 2 to 4 are generated based on interpolation between the existing waves in entry 1 and 5. Please keep the terms "wavetable" and "wave" in mind. Don’t bring them into confusion. Introduction Wavetable synthesis gives the MicroWave II/XT/XTk the unique sound character which makes it different from all other synthesizers and samplers. The principle of wavetable synthesis is not new, The PPG synthesizer, "Wavecomputer 360", "Wave 2", "Wave 2.2",and, "Wave 2.3", and, also the Waldorf MicroWave, (the first one) and, Waldorf Wave use this concept. The MicroWave II/XT/XTk contains some enhancements to wavetable synthesis which improve the sonic quality in a remarkable way. An introduction to wavetable synthesis needs some attention because its operation principle is different to other sound generating systems. Nevertheless you should spend a little time in understanding the basics. You will gain more than the effort it takes. Please note that you cannot create your own wavetables or waves with the MicroWave II/XT/XTk itself. To do so, you need a wavetable editor, a special computer program, that allows you to create and edit wavetables and waves.
  18. Jon Johnson

    Formanta Mini

    The Formanta Mini. is is a portable polyphonic 8-voiced analog\digital hybrid synthesizer with microprocessor made by soviet Formanta Factory in the 1980's. It features 32 unique and programmed timbres "presets". There is a vibrato effect with depth & frequency control & "unison" effect. You can can play 8 voices at one time. It features a unique set of electronic parts, reliable keyboard (41 notes C-E) made in magnetically controlled contacts; synthesis modules consist of independent boards, which is convenient for maintenance. The Mini is designed for playing musical compositions of different genres. It can play timbres of wind and strings instruments. Besides, it can create different synthesized timbres. Using this instrument one can get the following sound effects: frequency vibrato with the continuous control in depth and in frequency, percussion with continuous control, continuous fading and rise of sound, glissando. This instrument provides for continuous and discrete volume control. The Mini is an eight-voice keyboard with finger-board. It is designed for playing musical compositions of different genres. It can play timbres of wind and strings instruments. Besides, it can create different synthesized timbres. Using this instrument one can get the following sound effects: frequency vibrato with the continuous control in depth and in frequency, percussion with continuous control, continuous fading and rise of sound, glissando. This instrument provides for continuous and discrete volume control. Specifications: Controls on the grip handle - 2 Sustain buttons, Vibrato, Solo button (doubles the volume) Glissando Controller (1-2 semitone up\down pitch shift) Keyboard's volume - 3 and 5/12 octave Audible range - 4 and 5/12 octave Number of fixed timbres - 32 The range of frequency vibrato control - 0,5:10Hz Range of depth vibrato control - 0:6% Power consumption - 6 W Dimensions - 600x250x85 mm Weight - 5 kg Engineer: Alexander Reunov, designer: Andrey Petukhov, produced by Formanta Katchkanar radio plant.
  19. Jon Johnson

    Timewind - Klaus Schulze

    Timewind is the fifth album by Klaus Schulze. It was originally released in 1975, and in 2006 was the twenty-second Schulze album reissued by Revisited Records. It is Schulze's first solo album to use a sequencer. For many years this was his only work available in the United States and was therefore rated higher by American listeners than 1977's Mirage or X of the following year. It was awarded the Grand Prix du Disque (Grand Prize for Records) of L'Académie Charles Cros. Evolving slowly but deliberately over the course of each album side, Timewind has been deemed an electronic version of an Indian raga. It resembles in many ways a longer variation of the third track from Tangerine Dream's classic 1974 album Phaedra, "Movements of a Visionary," but it remains a transitional work somewhere between the Krautrock of Schulze's earlier output and the Berlin School character of his following efforts. The intention of Timewind was to invoke a timeless state in the listener. Both track titles are references to the nineteenth-century composer Richard Wagner. Bayreuth is the Bavarian town where Wagner had an opera house built for the first performance of his massive Ring Cycle. Wahnfried is the name of Wagner's home in Bayreuth in the grounds of which he was buried in 1883. It is also a pen-name used by Schulze himself. "Bayreuth Return" was recorded on a two-track equipment in one take, and is essentially "live in the studio". Its rhythmic basis is a single analog sequencer pattern, transposed and manipulated in real time. (The manipulation primarily consists of changing the 'return' point of the sequence.) String synthesizer chords, improvised melodies, and complex sound effects are the remaining ingredients. "Wahnfried 1883", in contrast, is a slow piece that was composed and multitracked. Its main building blocks are layers of slow, shimmering pads and lines. The kaleidoscopic key changes without obvious 'home key' (the piece remains consonant throughout) may be seen as a musical nod to Wagner: also, a Leitmotif appears. An excerpt of the graphic performance score appears on the inside sleeve of the original vinyl version. The reissue bonus track "Echoes of Time" is a longer alternate take of "Bayreuth Return".
  20. Jon Johnson

    PPG Wave 2

    The PPG Wave Synthesizer, is no doubt considered one of the most respected high-end synthesizers of the 1980s. developed by Wolfgang Palm. Its featured on countless records, and it inspired a whole generation of producers, composers and listeners. The PPG Wave 2 was the very first digital Wavetable synthesizer with analog filters that allowed completely new worlds of sound and endless sonic possibilities. Shortly afterwards, the successor PPG Wave 2.2 came out and was born to make history. With a gigantic arsenal of waveshapes, it could not only reproduce known analog sounds, but also brilliant choirs, bells and whistles. The digital sounds of wavetables had been unheard until then and offered sensational sonic evolutions by smoothly going through 64 waves back and forth. A characteristic anomaly of the Wave's sound was harsh artifacts and aliasing. At the time of it's release it was considered a caveat by critics of the instrument, however now it is a desired aspect of it. The combination of digital waveshapes and analog filters of the PPG was responsible for an unparalleled fat and thrust boosting character. The original PPG featured a unique user-interface, the "Analog Control Panel" offered direct access to many parameters, while digital menus were edited with somewhat cryptic acronyms that you had to look up in the manual in your lap.
  21. Jon Johnson

    Korg KARMA Music Workstation

    The Korg KARMA Keyboard builds on the effects and synth engines of KORG's epic Triton. The Karma's revolutionary technology generates amazing phrases, grooves, and other effects ”- arpeggios, glissandos, fingerpicking and guitar strumming, portamento, pitch-bend moves, and more. Karma gives you the power to play impossible interwoven cascades of notes, techno arpeggios and effects, dense rhythmic and melodic textures, and natural-sounding glissandos. Alter and randomize all of it in real time with a bank of knobs and switches. Create 640 user programs (384 preloaded), plus 256 ROM programs and nine drum programs with 64 drum kits. Combine up to eight programs set up in splits and layers for 768 possible user combos. The 16-track sequencer handles up to 200,000 notes and 200 songs (999 measures per song). Realtime Pattern Play/Recording for one-touch phrases. Seven Years in the Making At Korg they're always dreaming up innovative ways to make their keyboards more expressive, more powerful, and more musical. When they first learned about a brand new technology called KARMA, they knew they'd found one. Seven years after assembling a global team of skilled engineers, programmers and musicians, the Karma Music Workstation brings new music-making possibilities to life. To start, its synth and effects engines are identical to Triton's - so you know how great it sounds. It's also compatible with Triton sound data and supports the same user-installable PCM and MOSS expansion options so your sound palette can grow. Plus, the Karma Music Workstation provides the same feature-packed 16-track sequencer that has made the Korg Triton the leader in music workstations. So what makes this new keyboard so special? It's KARMA, Korg's revolutionary technology that generates amazing phrases, grooves and other musical effects that can be altered and randomized in real-time. With a bank of knobs and switches, you control elements like rhythmic complexity, harmony, melodic repeat, phrasing, panning...even the synth's sound and effects. KARMA gives you the power to play impossible, interweaving cascades of notes, techno arpeggios and effects, dense rhythmic and melodic textures, natural-sounding glissandos, intricate fingerpicking and guitar strumming, swooping portamento and pitch bend moves to name but a few. The only limiting factor is your imagination. Karma like this only comes around once every seven years. Fortunately for you, the wait is over. KORG's finest tone generator -- the HI synthesis system The 62-voice Karma Music Workstation features the same world-renowned HI (Hyper Integrated) synthesis system as Korg's TRITON Music Workstation/Sampler. It includes 425 high-quality PCM multisamples and 413 drum samples covering a wide range of musical needs”32 Mbytes in all. And an array of editable parameters let you tweak every sonic detail. The effects section provides 102 effect algorithms, and you can use 5 insert effects, 2 master effects and a three-band equalizer simultaneously. Effect routing is very flexible, enabling you to send sound through any combination of effects and on to any of the four outputs. Alternate Modulation and Effect Dynamic Modulation are also provided, letting you modulate parameters such as pitch, filter, amp, EG and LFO. Delay time and LFO can also be synchronized to MIDI clock or tempo. You can even sync the sounds or effects with the tempo of the KARMA function or the sequencer playback. KORG's superior programs and combis The Karma Music Workstation contains a rich assortment of sounds created by KORG's legendary voicing team, acclaimed by professional musicians around the world. There are 640 user programs (384 preloaded), plus 256 programs and 9 drum programs compatible with GM level 2 in ROM. Drum programs can select from 64 user drum kits (16 preloaded) and the 9 GM drum kits. A Combination lets you use up to eight programs set up as splits and layers, and you have immediate access to as many as 768 user combinations (384 preloaded). KARMA settings have been made for all preloaded sounds, so you can simply select a sound and play phrases immediately. Install option boards to add PCM sounds or a DSP tone generator In addition to the internal PCM sounds, the Karma Music Workstation can accommodate the same optional EXB-PCM series PCM Expansion Boards available for the TRITON. Each board adds 16 Mbytes of PCM data plus programs and combinations that use this data, further broadening your sound palette. However it does not include new GE's or GE assignments. KARMA can be expanded by the installation of the ultimate DSP tone generator --- the 13 oscillator 6-voice MOSS (Multi-Oscillator Synthesis System) tone generator featured on the Z1. This lets you use all synthesis methods --- PCM, analog, VPM (variable phase modulation), and physical modeling --- on a single instrument. When the MOSS tone generator is installed, 128 MOSS programs are added. You can create combination programs that use multiple MOSS timbres together with HI sounds. MOSS (MULTI OSCILLATOR SYNTHESIS SYSTEM) The MOSS sound generator consists of Voice, EG and LFO sections. The voice section contains two powerful oscillator blocks OSC1/OSC2 that let you combine up to two of thirteen types of oscillator algorithm (resonance, organ model, electric piano model, standard, ring modulation, VPM, brass model, reed model and more), a sub oscillator, and a noise generator. The voice section also contains a filter block featuring two multi-mode filters that cover the range from analog synth sounds to complex sounds such as the body resonance of violin or guitar, or even human voice. To this are added five EG units and four LFO units, providing a rich variety of tonal and pitch changes for each voice. MOSS SPECIFICATIONS Sound Source: 6 voices, 2 oscillators (max.) + sub oscillator + noise generator Oscillator Types: 13 (Standard, Ring Modulation, Cross Modulation, Oscillator Sync, VPM (Variable Phase Modulation), Comb filter oscillator, Resonance oscillator, Organ model, Electric piano model, Brass model, Reed model, Plucked string model, Bowed string model) Programs: 128 [* Developed under license of physical modeling patents (listed in http://www.sondius-XG.com) owned by Stanford University, USA, and by Yamaha Corporation.] 16 track sequencer + KARMA functionality equals enhanced music production The Karma Music Workstation contains a 16-track sequencer with a capacity of up to 200,000 notes and 200 songs (up to 999 measures for each song). Phrases generated by the KARMA function can be recorded directly, and you can add manually-played and step-recorded phrases to create a song quickly and easily. The RPPR (Realtime Pattern Play/Recording) function lets you play back a phrase by pressing a single key, and 150 drum and percussion patterns are provided. Many other convenient functions help you produce songs efficiently, such as Template songs, which allow you to call up a pre-arranged group of instruments and effects, and a Track Play Loop function that lets you specify looped measures independently for each track. A Cue List function lets you assemble your final song from up to 99 different sequences for easy arranging. Songs you create can be saved in SMF (Standard MIDI File) format or in a KORG TRITON compatible format so that data can be exchanged with other devices. (Note - The TRITON arpeggiator function cannot be reproduced on the KARMA Music Workstation.) The Song Play mode allows you to play back SMF files directly from floppy disk. You can perform on the keyboard along with the playback, or use the KARMA function in sync with the playback tempo. Four channel audio output In addition to the L/MONO and R main stereo audio outputs, you can use two independent audio outputs for a total of four channels of audio output. Oscillators, drums, timbres/tracks, and the signals from the insert effects can be freely routed to any output. KARMA. The new music-generation technology that takes music production into a new dimension. The KARMA Variable Performance Modeler featured on the Karma Music Workstation is a completely unique function that lets you generate music in a whole new way. Based on the notes and chords that you play, KARMA will automatically generate and mold phrases and patterns. Now you can instantly create sophisticated phrases and musical changes that would have required lengthy arranging and step input if done manually. Since the KARMA function lets you control numerous musical elements such as rhythm, duration, harmony, scale, ad-lib/humanize, random variation and tone, it can produce phrases and patterns far beyond the current range provided by conventional arpeggiators or static pattern playback functions. For example, you can create spectacular cascades of intricate interweaving notes, techno arpeggios and effects, dense rhythmic and melodic textures, natural sounding glissandos for acoustic instrument programs, guitar strumming and finger-picking simulations, random effects, auto-accompaniment effects, gliding and swooping portamento and pitch bend effects and new sound design possibilities. GEs bring KARMA to life The basis of the phrase or pattern is a Generated Effect (GE) and the KARMA Module Parameters that control that GE. One KARMA module can be used in Program mode. Four KARMA modules can be used in Combination/Sequencer/Song Play modes, so that separate modules can generate independent phrases to play different sounds such as drums, bass, guitar, and piano to create a full ensemble using the KARMA function. The GE that is the basis of the phrase or pattern controls how note data from the keyboard is developed as well as how rhythm, chord structure, velocity, and more are controlled. With approximately 400 parameters in a single GE, the KARMA function can control virtually any type of tonal or phrase change. These parameters include elements like harmony, scale, ad-lib/humanize, rhythm randomization and complexity, phrase variation, tone, pan, effects, pitch bend, volume, velocity, duration, MIDI control changes, chord control, Melodic Repeat (TM) (MIDI delay/repeat), and pitch change. Up to sixteen of these parameters are available for realtime control over a GE, and can be adjusted by operating the Realtime Control knobs and switches while you play. The KARMA Music Workstation provides over 1,000 different GE's organized into 17 categories, and new GEs can be loaded as they are made available. By simply selecting a GE you can create music in many different genres, using a variety of instruments and performance techniques. Unleashing the Power of KARMA GEs Check out "Unlocking the Power of Karma "Getting Creative with Karma GE's, which includes mp3 examples and some cool tips on using GE's with different sounds. Check out the technical tips article "Taming KARMA GEs" to find out how to maximize the performance of the KARMA Music Workstation. KARMA puts you in control With KARMA, every aspect of a musical phrase has been separated into independently controllable attributes. Each of these attributes is controlled by a separate group of parameters, which can be individually varied or changed in groups in real-time as the music is being generated; or changed all at once with the selection of a program or combination. While the Karma Music Workstation generates phrases, you can tweak the onboard controllers so your performance will never sound "canned" or static. You can use the eight knobs and two switches to vary different combinations of the RT (Real-time) Parameters that have been optimized for each GE by Korg's sound programmers. The two scenes available allow you to save two settings of these controllers for instant recall. You can also manipulate parameters with MIDI control messages. There has never been a system that provides this level of interaction and variability, and the results that can be achieved will inspire you to new levels of creativity.
  22. Jon Johnson

    Moog Modular System IIp

    The Moog Modular IIp was built as a moderately complex instrument that filled the place for Electronic Music Classes and/or in a recording studio.
  23. Jon Johnson

    Moog Modular System IIp

    The Moog Modular IIp was built as a moderately complex instrument that filled the place for Electronic Music Classes and/or in a recording studio. View full synthesizer
  24. Jon Johnson

    EMS VCS3 The Putney

    Electronic Music Studios first commercial product the VCS3 also known as The Putney is a portable synthesizer introduced in 1969.It was housed in a solid Afromosia cabinet housed the following modules interconnected by means of a matrix patchboard. The VCS3 was more or less the first portable commercially available synthesizer—portable in the sense that the VCS 3 was housed entirely in a small, wooden case, unlike previous machines from American manufacturers such as Moog Music, ARP and Buchla which were housed in large cabinets and were known to take up entire rooms.
  25. Jon Johnson

    GeneralMusic S3 Turbo Music Processor

    The Generalmusic S3 Turbo Series Music Processor is an instrument conceived and developed with the most up-to date technology to guarantee a high degree of reliability and durability. The name “Music Processor” describes the instrument’s ability to handle the complete, creative process, starting from sound synthesis right down to the registration of multitimbral songs and the complete control of the entire MIDI setup. The S3 Turbo Music Processor is a digital synthesizer workstation with 6 MB of sampled waveforms as the basis for the oscillators which are processed through two variable filters and a programmable envelope. The S3 Turbo Music Processor came standard with 2 MB of sample ram and with the new Turbo feature, it allowed sample data to be loaded directly into the S3 from floppy disk without having to be converted on a computer first. Other new features added were 2000 sounds up from the original 1600 plus 100 Performances. The S3 Turbo retains all the great features from the original models like 209 waves in rom and two 12db variable filters that could also be set to act as one 24db variable filter. The keyboard still has Aftertouch and Velocity. With it's multiple sliders and buttons, plus two sets of MIDI jacks, make the S3 Turbo a great MIDI Master Keyboard Controller.
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