Jon Johnson

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Everything posted by Jon Johnson

  1. Siel DK600

    The SIEL DK600 is six voice analog synthesizer with digitally controlled oscillators. The DK600 is a programmable polyphonic synthesizer, featuring 6 voices with 2 DCO's each and keyboard dynamic control. Its 95 programs offer an extremely wide sonority range. The 12 Digitally Controlled Oscillators (DCO) make it possible for you to create no end of synthesized sounds with an excellent pitch stability (no special tuning required). A digital/analog converter, combined with 3 Low Frequency Oscillators (LFO), enables impressive modulations and a very rich and "fat" sound. DK 600 is a superb synthesis of both technical knowledge and musical experience. The controls layout enables simple real-time adjustment of all parameters and offers an immediate visual indication of operation in current program. The programmable dynamic envelope generator makes it possible for you to control both the Attack Time and the A.D.S.R. destination (filter, amplifier, or both) for advanced sound possibilities. Moreover, MIDI. connection allows you to hook the DK 600 together with any MIDI. equipped synthesizer or sequencer. MIDI. standard may be adopted also for interconnection to computers. The DK600 was released in the midst of the era of the Oberheim Matrix 12 and Roland Juno 106 which were both formidable competitors. However the Siel DK600 had dual oscillators per voice which enabled it to sound thicker than it's competitors because of its six voices having two oscillators per voice made it have 12 oscillators.
  2. Korg DS-8 FM Synthesizer

    The Korg DS-8 is an expandable FM synthesizer released by KORG in 1986 which used the Yamaha FM synthesis engine with 2-Op oscillators. 61 Keys in length with both initial and switchable aftertouch capabilities it stores up to 100 programs and 10 combinations in its internal memory. By using one of the optional non-volatile (but battery-powered) KORG RAM cards MCR-01, MCR-02, or MCR-03 this program memory can be expanded by extra programs and combinations: 100/10 for the MCR-01, 200/20 for the MCR-02, or 400/40 for the MCR-03. Programs can be backed up and received via standard MIDI dumps. The DS-8 features one joystick controller for bending pitch, timbre and modulation speed, one card slot for aforementioned KORG RAM Cards, MIDI IN/OUT/THRU jacks, a damper pedal, assignable pedal, assignable switch, program up pedal, one balance slider, four keyboard modes (Single, Layer, Double and Multi) and two slider controls which indicate the ability to edit the two oscillators from fast to slow. The three editable banks shown on the right side of the board (Function, Voice Parameter and Combi Parameter) provide multiple ways in which the user can edit the programs, banks and patches. At $1400 RRP the DS-8 was a revolutionary, cheap and affordable product for its time.
  3. Cosmic Furnace - Roger Powell

    Roger Powell debuted in 1973 with an overlooked solo release, Cosmic Furnace, and soon after, was invited by Rundgren to join up with the recently formed Utopia. Powell's debut with Utopia was on their second release, 1975's Another Live, which led to further work on Rundgren solo albums (1975's Initiation, 1976's Faithful, and 1978's in-concert Back to the Bars), as well as another prog rock-based Utopia release, 1977's RA. Wounded Bird. 2005.
  4. Moog The Source

    The Source is a monophonic analog synthesizer with 2 oscillators and noise generator, filter and 2 envelope generators. One for the amplifier and one for the filter. 37-note keyboard with modulation and pitch wheels. Each oscillator offers saw, triangle, and, square waves.The square weave can be adjusted for pulse-wave.They were still the familiar Moog oscillators but under digital control offering more solid stability. The sound of the Moog Source is said to be "fat" as any of their analog gear before it. The newer, cleaner interface points to Moog's insight at knowing where the market was headed for synthesizers. Moog Promotional Copy THE SOURCE is a microprocessor-controlled, programmable monophonic synthesizer from Moog Music. A unique touch panel and a master incremental control are used to store the setting of each section of the synthesizer in memory. where up to 16 presets may be instantly recalled. Sound sources consist of two audio oscillators and a noise source. The oscillators range from 32' to 1' and can produce sawtooth, triangular, and variable rectangular waveforms. Oscillator 2 may be synchronized to Oscillator 1, producing additional waveforms. The Moog • filter and voltage controlled amplifier are controlled by individual microprocessor-generated four-part contour generators. The oscillators and filter may be controlled by a low-frequency oscillator which produces triangular and square waves. Performance controls consist of pitch and modulation wheels and single or multiple triggering controls. Interface ports allow input and output of control voltages and triggers. The microprocessor allows saving and loading preset sounds with a standard audio tape recorder. The microprocessor controls a software-generated sequencer (two reel-time sequences of up to 64 notes), an arpeggiator with timing discrimination, automatic triggering, and soft-ware-generated sample + hold, routed to the oscillators and/ or filter. These controls are accessed by a second-level entry system.
  5. Moog Micromoog

    The Moog Micromoog is a single-oscillator monophonic synthesizer. Considered a budget synth alternative to the Minimoog with unique features like a ribbon controller and an early form of something like MIDI called Open System that allowed Moog synthesizers to connect and play together. It features 32 keys with audio processing through it's filter and VCA. Moog Promotional Copy You may have thought of owning a Moog synthesizer someday. But. you may also have thought it costs too much, or that it's hard to play. Wrong. Especially now, with the advent of the Micromoog. It's easy to buy. And easy to play. $695 suggested list. And it's every inch a Moog. With that patented, "fat" Moog sound, and all the smooth, playable features people buy Moons for. Plus a few new ones. Like the built-in ribbon controller. Slide your finger up the ribbon and the pitch slides up. Slide it down, the pitch slides down. And the sound snaps back to the key you're playing the moment you re-lease your finger. It's a simple little work of genius that lets you duplicate the blues guitar bend, the trombone slide. or the violin vibrato, not to mention your own unique expressions. Pitch drift is a thing of the past with this synthesizer because the Micromoog won't go out of tune. It has an oscillator control circuit that maintains it-self precisely at 130° F (55° C). No matter what the temperature is on stage. But the Moog features don't stop here. There's "noise" control for making drums, cymbals, steam engines and thunderstorms. Fully variable wave shape to get right down to the harmonic structure of sound. Rapid filter modulation for dinner bells, church bells, tubular bells. An eight octave range. Built-in sample and hold. Arid a lot more you'll discover when you visit your Moog dealer. All this brings us to the most important point - freedom of expression. And all for $695 suggested list.
  6. Waldorf Microwave XT

    The Microwave is still is one of the best choices when you’re looking for that unusual and cut-through sound. It’s all in Waldorf’s wavetable synthesis, which is behind the success of the legendary PPG synthesizers, the Waldorf Microwave I and of course the Wave – a dream-machine in its own right. About Wavetable Synthesis Basics The sound generation of the MicroWave II/XT/XTk is based on wavetable synthesis. This type of synthesis combines analog access and digital flexibility in a simple way. Although wavetable synthesis is a form of "sample playback" in principle, you should avoid this term because functionality, operation and results are totally different. The ROM area of the MicroWave II/XT/XTk currently consists of 65 wavetables, 31 locations are reserved for future ROM wavetables. The RAM area contains 32 user wavetables, which can be manipulated over MIDI via appropriate computer software. A wavetable is a list made up of 64 entries. Each entry represents one wave, that can be either located in the ROM or RAM area of the MicroWave II/XT/XTk or calculated by an algorithm after selecting the wavetable. For the purpose of using a wavetable inside a sound program, it doesn’t matter what source the wavetable comes from. A wavetable itself contains no wave data, but is in fact a collection of up to 64 entries referencing up to 64 waves. Not all entries of the wavetable have to contain entries. When one or several sequential entries contain no reference, the MicroWave II/XT/XTk calculates the waves for these locations automatically. The algorithm producing these "imaginary" waves uses an interpolation scheme that crossfades the "real" ones. E.g. when a wavetable contains entries in entry 95 RwkdTNpg8 1 and 5, the positions 2 to 4 are generated based on interpolation between the existing waves in entry 1 and 5. Please keep the terms "wavetable" and "wave" in mind. Don’t bring them into confusion. Introduction Wavetable synthesis gives the MicroWave II/XT/XTk the unique sound character which makes it different from all other synthesizers and samplers. The principle of wavetable synthesis is not new, The PPG synthesizer, "Wavecomputer 360", "Wave 2", "Wave 2.2",and, "Wave 2.3", and, also the Waldorf MicroWave, (the first one) and, Waldorf Wave use this concept. The MicroWave II/XT/XTk contains some enhancements to wavetable synthesis which improve the sonic quality in a remarkable way. An introduction to wavetable synthesis needs some attention because its operation principle is different to other sound generating systems. Nevertheless you should spend a little time in understanding the basics. You will gain more than the effort it takes. Please note that you cannot create your own wavetables or waves with the MicroWave II/XT/XTk itself. To do so, you need a wavetable editor, a special computer program, that allows you to create and edit wavetables and waves.
  7. PPG Wave 2

    The PPG Wave Synthesizer, is no doubt considered one of the most respected high-end synthesizers of the 1980s. developed by Wolfgang Palm. Its featured on countless records, and it inspired a whole generation of producers, composers and listeners. The PPG Wave 2 was the very first digital Wavetable synthesizer with analog filters that allowed completely new worlds of sound and endless sonic possibilities. Shortly afterwards, the successor PPG Wave 2.2 came out and was born to make history. With a gigantic arsenal of waveshapes, it could not only reproduce known analog sounds, but also brilliant choirs, bells and whistles. The digital sounds of wavetables had been unheard until then and offered sensational sonic evolutions by smoothly going through 64 waves back and forth. A characteristic anomaly of the Wave's sound was harsh artifacts and aliasing. At the time of it's release it was considered a caveat by critics of the instrument, however now it is a desired aspect of it. The combination of digital waveshapes and analog filters of the PPG was responsible for an unparalleled fat and thrust boosting character. The original PPG featured a unique user-interface, the "Analog Control Panel" offered direct access to many parameters, while digital menus were edited with somewhat cryptic acronyms that you had to look up in the manual in your lap.
  8. Korg KARMA Music Workstation

    The Korg KARMA Keyboard builds on the effects and synth engines of KORG's epic Triton. The Karma's revolutionary technology generates amazing phrases, grooves, and other effects ”- arpeggios, glissandos, fingerpicking and guitar strumming, portamento, pitch-bend moves, and more. Karma gives you the power to play impossible interwoven cascades of notes, techno arpeggios and effects, dense rhythmic and melodic textures, and natural-sounding glissandos. Alter and randomize all of it in real time with a bank of knobs and switches. Create 640 user programs (384 preloaded), plus 256 ROM programs and nine drum programs with 64 drum kits. Combine up to eight programs set up in splits and layers for 768 possible user combos. The 16-track sequencer handles up to 200,000 notes and 200 songs (999 measures per song). Realtime Pattern Play/Recording for one-touch phrases. Seven Years in the Making At Korg they're always dreaming up innovative ways to make their keyboards more expressive, more powerful, and more musical. When they first learned about a brand new technology called KARMA, they knew they'd found one. Seven years after assembling a global team of skilled engineers, programmers and musicians, the Karma Music Workstation brings new music-making possibilities to life. To start, its synth and effects engines are identical to Triton's - so you know how great it sounds. It's also compatible with Triton sound data and supports the same user-installable PCM and MOSS expansion options so your sound palette can grow. Plus, the Karma Music Workstation provides the same feature-packed 16-track sequencer that has made the Korg Triton the leader in music workstations. So what makes this new keyboard so special? It's KARMA, Korg's revolutionary technology that generates amazing phrases, grooves and other musical effects that can be altered and randomized in real-time. With a bank of knobs and switches, you control elements like rhythmic complexity, harmony, melodic repeat, phrasing, panning...even the synth's sound and effects. KARMA gives you the power to play impossible, interweaving cascades of notes, techno arpeggios and effects, dense rhythmic and melodic textures, natural-sounding glissandos, intricate fingerpicking and guitar strumming, swooping portamento and pitch bend moves to name but a few. The only limiting factor is your imagination. Karma like this only comes around once every seven years. Fortunately for you, the wait is over. KORG's finest tone generator -- the HI synthesis system The 62-voice Karma Music Workstation features the same world-renowned HI (Hyper Integrated) synthesis system as Korg's TRITON Music Workstation/Sampler. It includes 425 high-quality PCM multisamples and 413 drum samples covering a wide range of musical needs”32 Mbytes in all. And an array of editable parameters let you tweak every sonic detail. The effects section provides 102 effect algorithms, and you can use 5 insert effects, 2 master effects and a three-band equalizer simultaneously. Effect routing is very flexible, enabling you to send sound through any combination of effects and on to any of the four outputs. Alternate Modulation and Effect Dynamic Modulation are also provided, letting you modulate parameters such as pitch, filter, amp, EG and LFO. Delay time and LFO can also be synchronized to MIDI clock or tempo. You can even sync the sounds or effects with the tempo of the KARMA function or the sequencer playback. KORG's superior programs and combis The Karma Music Workstation contains a rich assortment of sounds created by KORG's legendary voicing team, acclaimed by professional musicians around the world. There are 640 user programs (384 preloaded), plus 256 programs and 9 drum programs compatible with GM level 2 in ROM. Drum programs can select from 64 user drum kits (16 preloaded) and the 9 GM drum kits. A Combination lets you use up to eight programs set up as splits and layers, and you have immediate access to as many as 768 user combinations (384 preloaded). KARMA settings have been made for all preloaded sounds, so you can simply select a sound and play phrases immediately. Install option boards to add PCM sounds or a DSP tone generator In addition to the internal PCM sounds, the Karma Music Workstation can accommodate the same optional EXB-PCM series PCM Expansion Boards available for the TRITON. Each board adds 16 Mbytes of PCM data plus programs and combinations that use this data, further broadening your sound palette. However it does not include new GE's or GE assignments. KARMA can be expanded by the installation of the ultimate DSP tone generator --- the 13 oscillator 6-voice MOSS (Multi-Oscillator Synthesis System) tone generator featured on the Z1. This lets you use all synthesis methods --- PCM, analog, VPM (variable phase modulation), and physical modeling --- on a single instrument. When the MOSS tone generator is installed, 128 MOSS programs are added. You can create combination programs that use multiple MOSS timbres together with HI sounds. MOSS (MULTI OSCILLATOR SYNTHESIS SYSTEM) The MOSS sound generator consists of Voice, EG and LFO sections. The voice section contains two powerful oscillator blocks OSC1/OSC2 that let you combine up to two of thirteen types of oscillator algorithm (resonance, organ model, electric piano model, standard, ring modulation, VPM, brass model, reed model and more), a sub oscillator, and a noise generator. The voice section also contains a filter block featuring two multi-mode filters that cover the range from analog synth sounds to complex sounds such as the body resonance of violin or guitar, or even human voice. To this are added five EG units and four LFO units, providing a rich variety of tonal and pitch changes for each voice. MOSS SPECIFICATIONS Sound Source: 6 voices, 2 oscillators (max.) + sub oscillator + noise generator Oscillator Types: 13 (Standard, Ring Modulation, Cross Modulation, Oscillator Sync, VPM (Variable Phase Modulation), Comb filter oscillator, Resonance oscillator, Organ model, Electric piano model, Brass model, Reed model, Plucked string model, Bowed string model) Programs: 128 [* Developed under license of physical modeling patents (listed in http://www.sondius-XG.com) owned by Stanford University, USA, and by Yamaha Corporation.] 16 track sequencer + KARMA functionality equals enhanced music production The Karma Music Workstation contains a 16-track sequencer with a capacity of up to 200,000 notes and 200 songs (up to 999 measures for each song). Phrases generated by the KARMA function can be recorded directly, and you can add manually-played and step-recorded phrases to create a song quickly and easily. The RPPR (Realtime Pattern Play/Recording) function lets you play back a phrase by pressing a single key, and 150 drum and percussion patterns are provided. Many other convenient functions help you produce songs efficiently, such as Template songs, which allow you to call up a pre-arranged group of instruments and effects, and a Track Play Loop function that lets you specify looped measures independently for each track. A Cue List function lets you assemble your final song from up to 99 different sequences for easy arranging. Songs you create can be saved in SMF (Standard MIDI File) format or in a KORG TRITON compatible format so that data can be exchanged with other devices. (Note - The TRITON arpeggiator function cannot be reproduced on the KARMA Music Workstation.) The Song Play mode allows you to play back SMF files directly from floppy disk. You can perform on the keyboard along with the playback, or use the KARMA function in sync with the playback tempo. Four channel audio output In addition to the L/MONO and R main stereo audio outputs, you can use two independent audio outputs for a total of four channels of audio output. Oscillators, drums, timbres/tracks, and the signals from the insert effects can be freely routed to any output. KARMA. The new music-generation technology that takes music production into a new dimension. The KARMA Variable Performance Modeler featured on the Karma Music Workstation is a completely unique function that lets you generate music in a whole new way. Based on the notes and chords that you play, KARMA will automatically generate and mold phrases and patterns. Now you can instantly create sophisticated phrases and musical changes that would have required lengthy arranging and step input if done manually. Since the KARMA function lets you control numerous musical elements such as rhythm, duration, harmony, scale, ad-lib/humanize, random variation and tone, it can produce phrases and patterns far beyond the current range provided by conventional arpeggiators or static pattern playback functions. For example, you can create spectacular cascades of intricate interweaving notes, techno arpeggios and effects, dense rhythmic and melodic textures, natural sounding glissandos for acoustic instrument programs, guitar strumming and finger-picking simulations, random effects, auto-accompaniment effects, gliding and swooping portamento and pitch bend effects and new sound design possibilities. GEs bring KARMA to life The basis of the phrase or pattern is a Generated Effect (GE) and the KARMA Module Parameters that control that GE. One KARMA module can be used in Program mode. Four KARMA modules can be used in Combination/Sequencer/Song Play modes, so that separate modules can generate independent phrases to play different sounds such as drums, bass, guitar, and piano to create a full ensemble using the KARMA function. The GE that is the basis of the phrase or pattern controls how note data from the keyboard is developed as well as how rhythm, chord structure, velocity, and more are controlled. With approximately 400 parameters in a single GE, the KARMA function can control virtually any type of tonal or phrase change. These parameters include elements like harmony, scale, ad-lib/humanize, rhythm randomization and complexity, phrase variation, tone, pan, effects, pitch bend, volume, velocity, duration, MIDI control changes, chord control, Melodic Repeat (TM) (MIDI delay/repeat), and pitch change. Up to sixteen of these parameters are available for realtime control over a GE, and can be adjusted by operating the Realtime Control knobs and switches while you play. The KARMA Music Workstation provides over 1,000 different GE's organized into 17 categories, and new GEs can be loaded as they are made available. By simply selecting a GE you can create music in many different genres, using a variety of instruments and performance techniques. Unleashing the Power of KARMA GEs Check out "Unlocking the Power of Karma "Getting Creative with Karma GE's, which includes mp3 examples and some cool tips on using GE's with different sounds. Check out the technical tips article "Taming KARMA GEs" to find out how to maximize the performance of the KARMA Music Workstation. KARMA puts you in control With KARMA, every aspect of a musical phrase has been separated into independently controllable attributes. Each of these attributes is controlled by a separate group of parameters, which can be individually varied or changed in groups in real-time as the music is being generated; or changed all at once with the selection of a program or combination. While the Karma Music Workstation generates phrases, you can tweak the onboard controllers so your performance will never sound "canned" or static. You can use the eight knobs and two switches to vary different combinations of the RT (Real-time) Parameters that have been optimized for each GE by Korg's sound programmers. The two scenes available allow you to save two settings of these controllers for instant recall. You can also manipulate parameters with MIDI control messages. There has never been a system that provides this level of interaction and variability, and the results that can be achieved will inspire you to new levels of creativity.
  9. Moog Modular System IIp

    The Moog Modular IIp was built as a moderately complex instrument that filled the place for Electronic Music Classes and/or in a recording studio. View full synthesizer
  10. Moog Modular System IIp

    The Moog Modular IIp was built as a moderately complex instrument that filled the place for Electronic Music Classes and/or in a recording studio.
  11. Moog Minimoog Model D

    The Minimoog is a monophonic analog synthesizer, invented by Bill Hemsath and Robert Moog. It was released in 1970 by R.A. Moog Inc. (Moog Music after 1972), and production was stopped in 1981. It was re-designed by Robert Moog in 2002 and released as Minimoog Voyager. In May 2016, Moog announced a limited-run "pilot production" reissue of the Model D, to be launched at Moogfest. It went into full production shortly afterwards, but Moog Music announced on June 27, 2017 that it was ending the production run of the Model D reissue. The Minimoog was designed in response to the use of synthesizers in rock/pop music. Large modular synthesizers were expensive, cumbersome, and delicate, and not ideal for live performance; the Minimoog was designed to include the most important parts of a modular synthesizer in a compact package, without the need for patch cords. It later surpassed this original purpose, however, and became a distinctive and popular instrument in its own right. It remains in demand today, over four decades after its introduction, for its intuitive design and powerful bass and lead sounds. At its most basic, the Minimoog control panel can be broken up into three sections: - The signal generators (the three VCOs or voltage-controlled oscillators and pink or white noise) - The filter (the VCF or voltage-controlled filter) - The amplifier (the VCA or voltage-controlled amplifier) The Minimoog is monophonic (only one note can be played at a time) and its three-oscillator design gave it its famous fat sound. Four prototypes were made over the years before a final design was decided upon to release as a commercial product. The Minimoog Model D adapted some of the circuitry (such as the filter section) from earlier modular instruments, but designed other circuitry (such as the oscillators and contour generators) from scratch. To produce a sound, the musician would first choose a sound shape to be generated from the VCO(s) and/or the type of noise (white or pink). The VCO provides a choice of several switchable waveforms: - triangle wave - reverse sawtooth/ramp wave - sawtooth/triangle (only in oscillators 1 and 2/sawtooth wave in oscillator 3) - square wave - two different width pulse waves The signals are routed through the mixer to the VCF (voltage-controlled filter), where harmonic content can be modified and resonance added. The filtered signal is then routed to the voltage-controlled amplifier (VCA), where its contour is shaped by a dedicated ADS (attack, decay/release, sustain) envelope generator. Part of the appeal of this instrument over the early modular Moogs was that the Minimoog required no patch cables; its signal and control voltage path is hard-wired, or "normalled". While this imposed the signal flow limitation outlined above (VCO → VCF → VCA), there are ways to tweak the sound. For example, in reality, the Minimoog has six sound sources. Five of these sound sources pass to a mixer with independent level controls: - 3 voltage-controlled oscillators (see above) - a noise generator - an external line input And the VCF can itself be made to oscillate, thus providing the Minimoog's sixth sound source. The voltage-controlled filter (VCF) and voltage-controlled amplifier (VCA) each have their own ADSD envelope generator (or Attack-Decay-Sustain-Decay). Musicians who are familiar with more modern synthesizers might expect the last letter to be R for "Release" (as in ADSR). However, on the Minimoog, the envelopes are ADSD, as the decay setting also sets the time for what is regularly known as release. In other words, there are three knobs to control 4 sections of the sound (most modern synths have four knobs, one for each section) — a "shortcoming" that doesn't seem to diminish the Minimoog's popularity in any way.[citation needed] There is also a switch above the pitch and modulation wheels to engage the final decay stage as well as a switch for engaging the glide circuit. The VCF is of transistor ladder type, a design patented by Moog (US 3,475,623).[5][6] Rumors that Moog had to go to court over the patent seem to be nothing more; 'differences' with ARP at one point were settled amicably.[7] The output of the third oscillator and/or the noise generator can also be routed to the control voltage inputs of the filter and/or oscillators. The amount of pitch or filter modulation thus realized is controlled by the modulation wheel, which is the right one of the two plastic disks located to the left of the keyboard. In this way, the third oscillator is frequently used as a low-frequency oscillator to control pitch (oscillator modulation) and/or harmonic content (filter cutoff frequency modulation). The Minimoog can be controlled using its built-in, 44-note keyboard, which is equipped with modulation and pitch-bend wheels or by feeding in an external one-volt-per-octave pitch-control voltage and triggering the envelope generators with an inverted switch trigger (S-Trigger in Moog terminology). External pitch control does not pass through the glide circuit, nor is it presented to the VCF tracking switches — the external inputs were not designed for external keyboard control. The lowest note played on the keyboard determines the pitch, a condition that is referred to as low-note priority. The envelope generators do not re-trigger unless all notes are lifted before the next note is played, an important characteristic which allows phrasing. The modulation and pitch-bending wheels were an innovation that many instrumentalists found to be extremely playable. The pitch-bend wheel is on the left of the modulation wheel. It is normally kept in the centered position. It is not spring-loaded; the player must return it to the centered position to play in tune. There is a delicate detent mechanism to help the player find the center position tactually. In sharp contrast to later synthesizers that also have pitch-bend wheels, there is no deadband near the center of the wheel's travel; the wheel produces minute changes in pitch no matter how slightly it is moved in either direction. The wheel can therefore be used to introduce slight vibrato or nuance, as well as accurate pitch changes. However, Moog later recommended adding a deadband mod and published this mod in their factory service notes. The detent mechanism can be adjusted somewhat in its strength.
  12. Akai Professional MINIAK

    Create YOUR sound - The MINIAK is a powerful performance and production synthesizer. The MINIAK empowers creative musicians with phrase and step sequencing, a built-in drum machine/rhythm sequencer, an arpeggiator, a 40-band vocoder, stereo effects, and a virtual analog synth engine developed in partnership with the world-class Alesis synth team. While the compact, portable synth shines on stage, the MINIAK is also at home in the production studio delivering 24-bit audio resolution. The MINIAK puts up to eight multi-timbral voices at your fingertips, each with three oscillators. You can create interesting and unique sounds and take advantage of the more-than-600 preset sounds and store up to 1,000 programs in the MINIAK. The synth also has two multi-mode filters, three envelope generators, two LFOs, stereo effects, and a 40-band vocoder. On top of all of this sound-melding power, the MINIAK has a comprehensive sequencer with step and dynamic real time phrase sequencing, a drum machine/rhythm sequencer, and an arpeggiator to aid in creating the landscapes and textures you’re after. Rounding out this complete instrument are high-resolution, 24-bit balanced 1/4" inputs and outputs. The MINIAK has a 37-key semi-weighted keyboard with velocity sensitivity for all-in-one performance. It can also be used as a sound source for MPCs, computer software, and keyboards via MIDI. Under the Hood A MINIAK program is a sound built from the MINIAK’s internal oscillators, filters, and envelope generators. The MINIAK’s more than 600 preset programs span the range of classic analog synthesis sounds. If you’ve heard it before, you will probably find it in the MINIAK’s presets. In a synth, oscillators generate raw sound. Their output is fed into the filters, whose output is fed into the amplifiers. As the signal moves along that path, you can manipulate the mix at several points and apply modulations, envelopes, and effects to create a custom palette of sounds. Sound Generation The oscillators can produce different waveform types and shapes to create various harmonic structures, which our ears perceive as different timbres. Here are some of the waveforms you can create with the MINIAK’s oscillators: Sine – Smooth, pure sound Triangle – Fuller than a sine wave Sawtooth – Harsh sonic character Pulse – Harmonically rich, ranging from full-sounding square wave to a sharp impulse wave The MINIAK’s oscillators can produce continuously variable waveforms, so it can can hit any point between these examples. You can connect external audio sources – other synthesizers, mixers, guitars, and more – using the 1/4” inputs. The jacks accept either balanced or unbalanced cables. You can mix in the external audio sources with the MINIAK’s oscillators. The resulting combination is then sent through the MINIAK’s filters and effects. A special group of programs including vocoder programs exists just for use with the external inputs. The outputs of the oscillators, the noise generator, the ring modulator, and the external inputs are fed into a virtual mixing board called the pre-filter mix. From here, the signal hits the filters. For each source, you can specify its level and its balance: how much is sent to Filter 1 and how much is sent to Filter 2. Filtering The oscillators produce very raw sounds. To shape and fine-tune the sound, filters give you tools for dampening certain harmonics and boosting others. Filters alter the frequency content of the signal and can have a drastic effect on the sound. Each of the MINIAK’s voices contains two filters, and each filter can be one of the following different types, each with its own character and sonic flavor. They are: Bypass, Low Pass: ob 2-pole, tb 3-pole, mg 4-pole, rp 4-pole, jp 4-pole, al 8-pole; Band Pass: ob 2-pole, al 6-pole, octave dual, band limit; High Pass: ob 2-pole, op 4-pole; three Vocal Formants, four Comb Filters, Phase Warp, Frequency, Resonance, Key Tracking, Envelope Amount, Offset, and Absolute. After filtering, the signal is fed to the post-filter mix. For each filter output, as well as a pre-filter signal of your choice, you can specify a level and a pan. Output Processing In the output stage, the MINIAK allows you to apply a drive effect and add some compression, distortion, or other amplification effects. The MINIAK allows you to set up twelve modulation routes. Each of these is a virtual connection between some physical or internally generated source and some program parameter. Basically, a mod route tells the synth to automatically grab a knob and tweak it while a note is playing. Although there are quite a few sources that you can use for your mods, the most common ones involve the LFOs and the envelopes. LFOs LFO stands for low-frequency oscillator. LFOs are not designed to produce sound, but instead to tweak a program parameter according to a looping pattern. For example, if you are looking to add vibrato, you need the pitch to continuously waver up and down. Each of the MINIAK’s voices contains two LFOs, each of which offers rate, depth, shape, and tempo sync. The MINIAK’s LFO can sync to the internal clock or any external source via MIDI. Envelopes If you hit a note on a piano, you hear a burst of sound energy as the hammer strikes the string, followed by lower level of loudness as you hold down the note and let the string ring out, which fades quickly as soon as you release the note and the damper is applied. Synthesizers model this behavior using ADSR Envelopes. ADSR stands for Attack, Decay, Sustain, and Release, and represents the different stages that the sound goes through over the life of the note. The MINIAK also has an envelope that is specifically designed for loudness, called the Amp Envelope. Envelopes are useful in all sorts of mod routes, which is why you can hook up any of the MINIAK’s envelopes to any modulatable program parameter. Each of the MINIAK’s voices contains three envelopes: Amp Envelope, Filter Envelope, and Pitch/Modulation Envelope. Sequencing The MINIAK has extensive sequencing and arpeggiation performance capabilities. Arpeggios and sequences both respond to a key-press by playing a series of notes over a programmed rhythmic pattern. An arpeggio loops over whatever notes you are holding down on the keyboard. If you hold down a chord, the MINIAK will generate a melody by playing each note of your chord individually. A sequence has a melody line built in so you can hold down a single key and the MINIAK will play back that melody relative to that key. Pressing another key will transpose the sequence. The MINIAK has MPC-style step sequencing and recorder-style dynamic real time phrase sequencing. There’s also a drum machine/rhythm sequencer for the built-in drum sounds. Effects The MINIAK has a full complement of stereo effects including Chorus, Feedback, Theta Flanger (Phaser + Flanger), Thru Zero Flanger, Super Phaser, Notch Frequency, String Phaser, 40-Band Vocoder, Analysis Gain, Sibilance Boost, Band Shift, Synthesis Input, Analysis Signal In, Analysis Mix, six types of Delay, and three types of Reverbs. With the extensive sound generating and manipulating power of the MINIAK, the sounds you dream up are as easy to create as twisting a few knobs. And creating complete soundscapes with the sequencer and arpeggiator couldn’t be easier. Step up to the only synth with the Akai Professional name… the MINIAK.
  13. Spectral Audio ProTone

    The ProTone is a monophonic Analog Synthesizer with an internal MIDI Interface. Because of the full analog design, the ProTone is perfect for creating powerful, special and never before heard sounds. And with its deep red front panel, it will look great in your rack. The basic principle of the ProTone corresponds to the tried and tested analog synthesizer principle with VCO, VCF, VCA, envelope generator and LFO. This principle is called subtractive synthesis. In order that the ProTone is suitable for MIDI, an additional MIDI to CV converter is necessary which converts the MIDI signals into analog signals with which the VCOs, the filter, as well as the envelope generator are controlled. The raw material for the sound is offered by the VCOs (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) in the form of a sawtooth or rectangular signal as well as the noise generator (for effects such as wind and thunder sounds). The width of the rectangular signal from VCO1 can be changed with the PW regulator. The narrower the rectangular signal (regulator turned to the right), the 'sharper' the sound. VCO2 is synchronised from VCO1 with the SYNC switch The tone will be interesting in this case when the TUNE regulator (5) of VCO2 is turned (or by modulating with the LFO VCO 2), which results in a typical "Sync Sound". By means of the external VCO input, other sounds can also serve as raw material. The ring modulator multiplies the signals of the two VCOs which markedly amplifies the beat (frequency difference). Note: When the SYNC switch (6) is switched on, no beats are developed and the ring modulator has therefore no effect. The SLIDE regulator determines the time balance from one note to another and is valid for both VCOs. Afterwards, the signal flows through the voltage controlled filter (VCF=Voltage Controlled Filter), within which certain frequency ranges are suppressed. The lowpass filter allows low frequencies to pass and suppresses the high ones, the highpass filter lets high frequencies through and suppresses the low ones. The frequency from which the signals are suppressed is called the limit or cut-off frequency. With the ProTone, this is formed from various sources: 1. CUTOFF frequency regulator 2. ENV MOD regulator (influence of the envelope on the cut-off frequency) 3. LFO 4. ACCENT regulator 5. KEYFOLLOW switch With the KEYFOLLOW switch the cut-off frequency increases on higher notes so that audible freqency bands always remain the same. The resonance forms a feedback of the output to the input of the filter and causes an amplification of the frequencies around the cut-off frequency. The ACCENT regulator sets the share of the second envelope and affects the cut-off frequency as well as the volume. It is only active when the ACCENT indicator lights, ie, when the accent function is switched on via the MIDI controller 65. The accent function is always active when the unit is switched on. By means of the MIDI controller 65, it is now possible, as with the TB 303, to give individual notes an accent (value 127) or to take an accent away (value 0). For this purpose, the corresponding control value must be sent in the sequencer, timed either before or with the note. Before the signal leaves the ProTone, it arrives at the VCA (Voltage Controlled Amplifier) which is availablin the ProTone in stereo form. Here the input signal is multiplied with a control signal. In this way, the volume can be influenced by a control signal which comes from the envelope generator and the MIDIconverter. The volume of the ProTone is controlled with the GROUND LEVEL regulator as well as via the MIDI controller EXT. Additional to this level is the short-term increase through the accent function. The panorama (volume relationship of the left-hand to the right-hand signal) can be set with the PAN regulator. Features 2 true VCO makes Sawtooth and Pulse Waves White Noise Generator True Ringmodulator Slide (Portamento) High and Lowpass Filter with Resonance Selectable 12 or 24 dB per Octave Accent (Decay Envelope for the Filter) Keyfollow Wide LFO Range: 0.005 ... 3800 Hz LFO Waves: Rectangle, Impuls, Triangle, Sawtooth, Sinus, Noise and Random LFO Targets: VC01, VC02, Pulse Width of VC01, Cutoff and Panaroma ADSR Envelope Stereo Output with Stereo Panning 5 Octaves MIDI Interface MIDI controlled Volume and Cutoff frequency Velocity sensitive CV and Gate In/Output to control vintage Synthesizer External VCO and LFO Inputs
  14. Synthstrom Audible is a boutique electronics manufacturer from Wellington, New Zealand. They recently unveiled their new instrument the Deluge. An instrument 3 years in the making as an all in one stand-alone, portable synthesizer, sequencer and sampler designed for the creation, performance and improvisation of electronic music. The Deluge was created from the beginning to be original design independent of influences from hardware of the past or currently being manufactured.The unit offers a wide range of specifications. SYNTHESIZER Full-featured internal synthesizer engine (subtractive and FM). Polyphony limited only by CPU. Upto 48 unaffected synth voices or 64 unaffected sample voices may play. Live adjustment of synth and effect parameters with two endless-turn encoders with LED level-meters. Easy buttons to select the functions these control. Parameter automation recording. Arpeggiator Dedicated volume and tempo knobs. LFOs and envelopes on each synth / sample. Highly customizable modulation matrix. Synthesizer engine features LPF / HPF, FM, portamento, oscillator sync, ring modulation, unison detune, and more. Four basic waveforms, or select any WAV file from the SD card. FX including delay, reverb, chorus, flanger, phaser, bitcrushing, sidechain effect, live stutter, and more. Keyboard mode, where the pads become a live instrument on a 2D grid. Preset or custom scales, or chromatic mode. Live processing of the audio input. SEQUENCER Piano-roll-style sequencing on 128 full RGB pads (16×8) with scrolling and zooming. Sequencing limited only by device RAM (many thousands of notes). CC control and sequencing on all 16 MIDI channels Advanced syncing capabilities. Non-standard time signatures supported. Adjustable swing. Horizontal note shift. MIDI program change and bank change. SAMPLER Loads samples from SD card (up to 32GB SDHC). All samples are streamed from the SD card. Time-stretching 5mm mic, ¼” line inputs and built-in microphone. Resampling Basic slicer CONNECTIVITY Two ¼” line outputs, and 3.5mm headphone output. 2x CV outputs. 0 – 10V, individually configurable to between 0.01 and 2.00 volts per octave, or to hertz-per-volt. 4x gate / trigger outputs individually configurable to v-trig or s-trig, with shared voltage switchable between 5V and 12V. Trigger clock output configurable, up to 192 PPQN. Trigger clock input, also with adjustable PPQN. MIDI input and output via hardware connectors or USB. Syncing via MIDI beat clock as master or slave. Simultaneously output separate sequences to all 16 MIDI channels, 2 CV / gate channels and 2 additional gate outputs, in addition to internal synthesizers / samples (limited only by CPU and RAM, as above). Powered via USB or 9 – 12V centre-negative (pedal-style) power supply (500mA) (not included). User-upgradeable firmware – expect updates from Synthstrom Audible. Internal speaker, rechargeable Li-ion battery (6+ hours of operation). Printed manual of software 1.3.0 is included.
  15. Sequential Prophet Prophet 5

    The Prophet-5 actually contains five individual synthesizers, termed 'Voices." For its principle sound sources, each voice contains two voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs), referred to as OSC A and OSC B. OSC A, OSC B, and a white noise source can be mixed into a resonant low-pass voltage-controlled filter (VCF). The filter modifies the voice timbre under control of its four-stage envelope generator. The filter may also serve as a sound source. Following each filter, a voltage-controlled amplifier (VGA) also controlled by a four-stage envelope generator shapes the voice amplitude. Only one voice is depicted on the control panel, because the voice controls "patch" the five voices identically. This makes the voices homophonous—they sound alike—with pitch differences corresponding to (at most) five simultaneously-held keys. Supplementing the basic voice are polyphonic modulation (POLY-MOD) signal routings within each voice that allow OSC B and the filter envelope generator to function as modulation sources applied to OSC A frequency or pulse width, or to the filter frequency. Finally, there is a single low-frequency oscillator (LFO) and a pink noise source which can be mixed to modulate all five voices, as adjusted by the modulation (MOD) wheel. The PITCH wheel raises or lowers the pitch of all voices by the same interval. The term "digital-analog hybrid" is often used to describe the Prophet. This means that instead of directly controlling the analog synthesizer voices, the keyboard and most controls are actually devices which input "data" to a microcomputer system which in turn "programs" the voices. The microcomputer system has three main functions. First, it solves the problem of generating five independent sets of voice control voltages and gate signals (which operate the envelope generators) from a single keyboard. Second, its digital memory provides a way to store all of the switch and knob settings which form a program. These programs are retained by the microcomputer memory even when the Prophet is turned off, thanks to a small battery with a 10- year life. Third, the microcomputer system keeps the ten voice oscillators in tune. Accessories specifically designed for the Prophet-5 include the Model 1005 Polyphonic Sequencer which allows direct storage of lengthy keyboard sequences, and the Model 1001 Remote Keyboard. For increased performance flexibility, the Model 8 Analog Interface Adapter enables remote control of the PITCH and MOD wheels by two Model St^O Voltage Pedals.
  16. eowave Quadrantid Swarm

    The Quadrantid Swarm is a desktop touch synthesizer aimed at sound designers and musicians who are looking for an expressive tool to explore rich and unusual soundscapes with a direct intuitive approach. Past research and development at eowave has contributed to a range of successful products aimed at musicians and performers - including sensor interfaces, MIDI devices, modular synthesizers and more. This has been honed and distilled in the Quadrantid Swarm. It is an instrument that has been designed openly - to be used with MIDI, alongside your modular synthesizer/CV sequencer or to be explored as a standalone drone/sequencer/generative synthesizer. Here is the first protoype being presented at Superbooth'17 (many features have been adapted between then and the production model!) Modes The QS now features 8 modes. Each should be considered a springboard for musical exploration, rather than a preset. The modes are not direct emulations of existing instruments, but they borrow on inspiration from their namesakes. We found that this was the best way to retain the immediacy of function per button design while offering a generous feature set. The QS will ship with a cheat sheet that details the specifics behind each mode - the waveform, perc sound and character effect. Front panel Building on the feedback we received at Superbooth 17, we have redesigned the front panel to be easier to read. This matte black PCB pictured below is the final material we will be using on production, although there is a mistake on this panel that will be rectified (white layer inverted!). Oscillator The oscillator section is a digital wave generator. In sequencer mode the spread control multiplies the waveform up to 8 waveforms. In keyboard mode the spread control will not affect the oscillator because the 8 waveforms are spread across the touch keyboard to be used as a simple polyphonic synthesizer. Character controls a different effect or folder depending on the mode. The character effects/folders will help you design timbres that will range from clean and glassy to dense and distorted. To change between sequencer and keyboard mode, hold shift and press start. CV IN - control voltage input from eurorack or analogue sequencers mod - attenuation for CV in freq - frequency (to tune the oscillator with your other devices) spread - in sequencer mode this controls the spread of the 8 triangle waves, in live mode this is inactive character - amount of wave folder or effect What else...? We have also added in a sine wave which isn't processed through the spread or folder, giving an extra layer to your sound design Percussion Tied to the fundamental frequency of the main oscillator is a percussive element. The type of synthesis implemented is different for each mode. perc - decay length Mixer A simpler mixer section, feeding into the two filters directly below, comprises of three inputs. One for the oscillator voice, one for the perc voice, and one spare. The spare input can be used to patch in an external signal, utilising the filters. With nothing patched in, the third input is pre-patched as a feedback for the spring reverb (which will overdrive/distort with high gain levels to great effect). voice vol - oscillator voice volume perc vol - percussion element volume IN - channel 3 input jack in vol - channel 3 input volume/pre-patched to spring reverb feedback Filter Two analogue 12db filters, based on our 'fluctuations magnétiques' module. Filter 1 can be switched between high or low pass. Filter 2 is low pass. Using the two filter poles together you can create a bandpass and other interesting filter shapes. This allows for rich, throaty and deep sound sculpting. cutoff - cutoff frequency mod - modulation attenuator MOD - modulation input res - resonance amount hi/low - high pass/low pass switch Modulation Two modulation sources unlock the expressivity of the synth. The first is an envelope, pre-patched to the cutoff on filter 1, and also patched to the VCA. The LFO section is pre-patched to the cutoff of filter 2 and features seven selectable waveforms via the shape function, and an 8th mode which is the sequencer CV out (allowing the sequencer to be patched to other devices). Speed is set using the speed knob. A square output has been included which can be useful for triggering clock resets and other timing functions. A slew in, out and attenuator has also been implemented to further your modulation experiments. Envelope GATE - gate input attack - attack length release - release length ENV - envelope out (pre-patched to MOD of filter 1) LFO triangle shape - LFO main output, LFO shape changes as per selection (pre-patched to MOD of filter 2) square shape - square output which remains square regardless of shape selection speed - LFO speed or frequency shape - select one of seven LFO shapes or sequencer CV out NOISE - noise output linked to LFO speed. Can be used as audio or modulation source SLEW IN - slew input slew - slew amount SLEW OUT - slew output Reverb An analog spring reverb adds bundles of character to the QS, and can be mixed and used to feedback into itself for chaotic overdrives. The reverb section can be used independently of the synth with your other devices, by patching a cable to REV IN, and using the main output. rev input - pre-patched to filter out, this is the reverb gain. It will clip at high levels rev level - reverb amount, higher levels give the impression of a larger space MOD - modulation input for reverb level REV IN - you can use the spring reverb of the QS independently with this input VCA A simple VCA can be patched to the envelope, LFO or external source to amplify the QS. VCA CV - pre-patched to ENV output VCA OUT - pre-patched to REV IN OUT - main mono output to connect to your mixer or audio interface Interfacing (MIDI, CV and audio inputs) We will be including a standard MIDI to 3.5mm adaptor to use in your live or home setup. CV, trigger, clock and reset inputs are also featured to use with eurorack standard devices. Pre-patching We designed the QS for immediate use without having to worry about complex patching, so pre-patching is used to make connections in logical places. Some of these are highlighted using arrows, particularly the modulation sources and connections, the audio routing hasn't been highlighted to keep the design clean, but is explained above. Capacitive touch keyboard To select a mode, hold shift and press the desired key. To change between kayboard and sequencer mode press shift and start. In keyboard mode you can play the keys as a traditional keyboard. Pots 1-8 above the keys tune each step. In sequencer mode, press start to begin the sequencer. Now each key acts as a gate on/off, which triggers the envelope. Active gates are represented with a red LED. Capacitive touch relies on the conductive nature of your body. The keyboard is used in selecting modes, turning on and off sequencer gates and playing the keyboard. Some of the modes also feature pressure sensitivity, allowing for velocity type control of the synthesizer. Memory The QS has no memory to save settings or sequences. The 8 modes are the only form of memory and cannot be overwritten. It is designed this way - as a tool for sketching, patching, jamming and experimentation. You can of course use your favourite sequencer to send clock, notes and gates over MIDI and CV.
  17. In 1970 Ralph Carmichael released the experimental and easy listening record The Electric Symphony. An instrumental album featuring multi-tracked Moog compositions with a conventional rhythm section. Its a well regarded album of synthesizer based music and noted for it's synth programming and track layering. The Moog programming was done by Fred Werner and the music was arranged by Ralph Carmichael and Clark Gassman. the music is critically hailed as up beat and different from it's other contemporaries of the early 1970's.
  18. The Wurlitzer Sideman

    The Rudolph Wurlitzer Company (Wurlitzer) released the first commercially produced drum machine called the Sideman in 1959. It was an "electro-mechanical" drum machine that offered a choice of 12 electronically generated predefined rhythm patterns with variable tempos. "The sound source was a series of vacuum tubes which created 10 preset electronic drum sounds. The drum sounds were 'sequenced' by a rotating disc with metal contacts across its face, spaced in a certain pattern to generate parts of a particular rhythm. Combinations of these different sets of rhythms and drum sounds created popular rhythmic patterns of the day, e.g. waltzes, fox trots etc. These combinations were selected by a rotary knob on the top of the Sideman box. The tempo of the patterns was controlled by a slider that increased the speed of rotation of the disc. The Sideman had a panel of 10 buttons for manually triggering drum sounds, and a remote player to control the machine while playing from an organ keyboard. The Sideman was housed in a wooden cabinet that contained the sound generating circuitry, amplifier and speaker.
  19. This long out-of-print, seminal album from 1980, profoundly influenced futurist ambient sounds and global-minded musical explorers. The gatefold features an essay by Brian Eno and an exclusive interview with Jon Hassell. Remastered on 180gm vinyl with a CD included. Originally released in 1980, Jon Hassell and Brian Eno’s collaborative album “Fourth World Music Vol.I: Possible Musics” is a sound document whose ongoing influence seems beyond dispute. Not only is the album a defining moment in the development of what Eno coined as “Ambient Music” but it also facilitated the introduction of Hassell’s “Future Primitive” trumpet stylings and visionary “Fourth World” musical theories to the broader public. These vectors continue to enrich contemporary audio culture. Eno’s Ambient strategies are now fixed in the DNA of electronic music and the cross-cultural legacy of Hassell’s “Fourth World” concept is apparent not only in the marketplace genre “World Music” but also more persuasively in the accelerating number of digitally driven, borderless musical fusions we now experience. Brian Eno has been an essential fixture of both experimental and popular music since the 1970’s: An art school education; early success as an androgynous synthesizer interventionist with Roxy Music; a run of influential vocal-oriented solo records; the embrace of the term “ambient music” and the application of it to increasingly discreet and oblique electronic instrumental albums; seminal collaborations with David Bowie, The Talking Heads, Robert Fripp and Krautrock pioneers Cluster; and by the mid-80’s chart-topping marquee productions for the Irish rock band U2. Jon Hassell’s musical journey, while more obscured from the cultural mainstream, is every bit as storied and individual as Eno’s. A childhood in Memphis; a classical conservatory education studying the trumpet; composition and electronic music study with Stockhausen in Cologne; a passage through the New York minimalist sphere with Terry Riley, Lamonte Young and Phillip Glass; a singular and radicalized approach to the trumpet developed after a mentorship with the Indian vocal master Pandit Pran Nath; collaborative excursions with The Talking Heads, Peter Gabriel, David Sylvian, Bjork and Ry Cooder; an ongoing questioning of the dichotomies between North and South, sacred and sensual, primitive and futurist. Glitterbeat is proud and honored to re-release and re-introduce this compelling, groundbreaking album.
  20. Jon Hassell - Powerspot

    American composer and trumpeter Jon Hassell is best known for his music of the Fourth World, which he describes as “coffee-colored classical.” The definition becomes clearer once you immerse yourself in the sounds of Power Spot. Hassell’s career is as varied as his education. A student of both Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pandit Pran Nath, he is known for overlooking idiomatic barriers in favor of something far broader. Nath left an indelible mark in Hassell, who turned to the master’s voice for guidance in his own playing. His unmistakable tones are achieved by singing into the instrument, thereby drawing clusters of sounds from a single exhalation. This recording is significant for a number of reasons, not least for indicating a moment in sonic history in which the electro-acoustic universe was beginning to spin some of its richer, more majestic galaxies. The music on Power Spot radiates like a supernova waiting patiently for the traction of celestial bodies to fan its clouds away, revealing softly spinning globes of breath and vapor. With such evocative titles as “Wing Melodies” and “The Elephant And The Orchid,” one feels almost overwhelmed by the range of possible imagery. And yet, like any question of mode or genre thereof, these words disappear behind the music’s waterfall. At first listen the album may seem to blend into a broad wash of sound, but lean in closer and you begin to hear the details emerge. The title track is perhaps the most potent, opening this portal to a wellspring of beats and train whistles. Brian Eno’s amphibian bass slithers through a pond of liquid mercury, fading into the gaseous darkness from which it sprang. Otherworldly connotations are bound to reveal themselves, and nowhere more so than in “Passage D.E.,” which sounds for all like the soundtrack to a documentary of some undiscovered planet. Notable also is “Miracle Steps,” where live percussion provides marked contrast to the synthetic overlay, drawing in the process the album’s most beautiful cartography. Power Spot is one protracted aerial view, a bubbling primordial soup of circuits and blips, funneled through such progressive sense of direction and atmosphere as only Hassell can activate. Unlike much of the knob-turning to grace the many electronic albums of the 80s, its sound is strikingly effusive and organic. In this ocean, one finds that the light of life shines brightest on the inside. It is a light that no clouds can obscure, a light that no darkness can close its eyes around. It is a journey of transience, of transport, of futurism and antiquity, of none of these things. Influential? More than words can say. Just listen to Paul Schütze’s Stateless, or the works of countless others who’ve clearly drunk from the Hassell font.
  21. Topic: Roland D-50

    The Roland D-50 Linear Arithmetic Synthesizer (LA synthesis) was Roland’s first digital synthesizer. It also had a digital filter/effects processor. One of Roland’s best-selling models, this synthesizer also excelled at analog-style sound. View full synthesizer
  22. Roland D-50

    The ROLAND D-50 is very different from any other synthesizer, past or present, and as such heralds the dawn of a new era in synthesis. In the past, synthesizers have progressed through several very diffrent stages. Firstly, there were ANALOG synthesizers, which relied on a variety of components, such as, VCO's, VCF's, and VCA's. These analog building blocks were relatively easy to understand and program , and they could produce sounds of remarkable warmth and character. However, when it came to accurately simulating acoustic sounds, the process could easily become too involved. On the other hand, the next breed of synthesizers, known as digital synthesizers, could easily simulate acoustic sounds, yet they were far more difficult to program. Furthermore, the digital technology behind these instruments seemed to imply that a different type of sound should occur. In general, just as an analog synthesizer would be described as "warm", in character, the digital counterpart was very often "thin". Essentially, the two types complemented each other, one being easy to program, the other capable of accurate simulation. The ROLAND D-50 has now changed all that. Thanks to a new custom designed Integrated Circuit known as the 'LA CHIP'. Here, LA stands for Linear Arithmetic synthesis which is the heart of the new technology. LA synthesis involves a great many technological advances resulting not only in a superior sound quality but also an improved ease of programming. In this way, Roland has succeeded in maintaining a high degree of familiarity to the user despite the technical wizardry involved. However, the true power of LA Synthesis lies within the digital Synthesizer section of the D— 50. Remember, first of all, that this is a totally digital instrument, even though the sound would seem to suggest far more. Through LA synthesis, the D— 50 appears to have four powerful synthesizers built in. Each of these hypothetical synthesizers could behave like a conventional analog syntheizer, or a PCM sampled synthesizer. Consequently, they are referred to as PARTIALS, since they are far more than just a pure synthesizer. These Partials are combined in pairs to form a TONE. A Tone could either be a mix of the two Partials, or they could take advantage of the LA version of cross modulation. In this way, some of today's more popular digital sounds are remarkably easy to achieve.
  23. EMS VCS3 The Putney

    Electronic Music Studios first commercial product the VCS3 also known as The Putney is a portable synthesizer introduced in 1969.It was housed in a solid Afromosia cabinet housed the following modules interconnected by means of a matrix patchboard. The VCS3 was more or less the first portable commercially available synthesizer—portable in the sense that the VCS 3 was housed entirely in a small, wooden case, unlike previous machines from American manufacturers such as Moog Music, ARP and Buchla which were housed in large cabinets and were known to take up entire rooms.
  24. EMS Spectre Video Synthesizer

    The Video Synthesiser, originally released as the Spectron, from EMS was an "Innovative Video Synthesiser" using analogue and digital techniques. The Spectre is a hybrid video synthesiser which uses the EMS patchboard system to allow completely flexible connections between module inputs and outputs. The video signals were digital, but they were controlled by analogue voltages. There was a digital patch board for image composition and an analogue patchboard for motion control. For any educational institution, Spectre will be invaluable as a tool for teaching principles of design, colour, and concepts of digital logic. Students can create works which are easily stored, permanently or temporarily, on videotape, and can be duplicated as easily as with audio recordings. For artists and video production studios, the applications are obvious. As well as being able to perform special effects with less hardware than is usual, Spectre can be used as a live performance instrument, for which there is no comparable system presently available. In industry, Spectre will be extremely useful in fields such as fabric and wallpaper design, where a simple photograph of the monitor screen would substitute for painstaking artist's renditions. Black and white images of products or advertisements can be colourized, and particular colours or combinations thereof substituted or recalled in an instant. To add to its commercial applications, Spectre is entertaining as well as useful. Its accessibility to even the most inexperienced of users will make it a unique attraction in any situation where entertainment is sought. All patching of functions in Spectre is done by means of pin board matrix connections. Signals coming out of functions appear at horizontal positions (rows) and inputs to functions, as well as to the final output, are at vertical positions (columns). Outputs are labelled at the left side of the pin matrix, inputs at the top. In order to produce an image on the monitor screen, signals must eventually reach the input columns of either Output A or Output B on the Digital Signal Matrix. Spectre has three types of digital output - luminance, colour 1 and colour 2 - which combine to send particular signal levels to the video output. There are 16 levels of luminance, & eight levels of each colour, making a total of 64 colour possibilities at any of 16 luminance levels. It is by manipulating the digital signals that produce these levels that we form images on the monitor screen.
  25. Moog Minitaur

    The Minitaur is the newest addition to the Taurus family of Analog Bass Synthesizers. It is an inconspicuously compact, subharmonic bass machine designed to integrate seamlessly into any performance or computer-based music workflow. Just as its progenitors, the Minitaur effortlessly does one thing above all others… wall splitting analog BASS. View full synthesizer