Jon Johnson

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Everything posted by Jon Johnson

  1. Sequential Prophet Prophet 5

    The Prophet-5 actually contains five individual synthesizers, termed 'Voices." For its principle sound sources, each voice contains two voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs), referred to as OSC A and OSC B. OSC A, OSC B, and a white noise source can be mixed into a resonant low-pass voltage-controlled filter (VCF). The filter modifies the voice timbre under control of its four-stage envelope generator. The filter may also serve as a sound source. Following each filter, a voltage-controlled amplifier (VGA) also controlled by a four-stage envelope generator shapes the voice amplitude. Only one voice is depicted on the control panel, because the voice controls "patch" the five voices identically. This makes the voices homophonous—they sound alike—with pitch differences corresponding to (at most) five simultaneously-held keys. Supplementing the basic voice are polyphonic modulation (POLY-MOD) signal routings within each voice that allow OSC B and the filter envelope generator to function as modulation sources applied to OSC A frequency or pulse width, or to the filter frequency. Finally, there is a single low-frequency oscillator (LFO) and a pink noise source which can be mixed to modulate all five voices, as adjusted by the modulation (MOD) wheel. The PITCH wheel raises or lowers the pitch of all voices by the same interval. The term "digital-analog hybrid" is often used to describe the Prophet. This means that instead of directly controlling the analog synthesizer voices, the keyboard and most controls are actually devices which input "data" to a microcomputer system which in turn "programs" the voices. The microcomputer system has three main functions. First, it solves the problem of generating five independent sets of voice control voltages and gate signals (which operate the envelope generators) from a single keyboard. Second, its digital memory provides a way to store all of the switch and knob settings which form a program. These programs are retained by the microcomputer memory even when the Prophet is turned off, thanks to a small battery with a 10- year life. Third, the microcomputer system keeps the ten voice oscillators in tune. Accessories specifically designed for the Prophet-5 include the Model 1005 Polyphonic Sequencer which allows direct storage of lengthy keyboard sequences, and the Model 1001 Remote Keyboard. For increased performance flexibility, the Model 8 Analog Interface Adapter enables remote control of the PITCH and MOD wheels by two Model St^O Voltage Pedals.
  2. eowave Quadrantid Swarm

    The Quadrantid Swarm is a desktop touch synthesizer aimed at sound designers and musicians who are looking for an expressive tool to explore rich and unusual soundscapes with a direct intuitive approach. Past research and development at eowave has contributed to a range of successful products aimed at musicians and performers - including sensor interfaces, MIDI devices, modular synthesizers and more. This has been honed and distilled in the Quadrantid Swarm. It is an instrument that has been designed openly - to be used with MIDI, alongside your modular synthesizer/CV sequencer or to be explored as a standalone drone/sequencer/generative synthesizer. Here is the first protoype being presented at Superbooth'17 (many features have been adapted between then and the production model!) Modes The QS now features 8 modes. Each should be considered a springboard for musical exploration, rather than a preset. The modes are not direct emulations of existing instruments, but they borrow on inspiration from their namesakes. We found that this was the best way to retain the immediacy of function per button design while offering a generous feature set. The QS will ship with a cheat sheet that details the specifics behind each mode - the waveform, perc sound and character effect. Front panel Building on the feedback we received at Superbooth 17, we have redesigned the front panel to be easier to read. This matte black PCB pictured below is the final material we will be using on production, although there is a mistake on this panel that will be rectified (white layer inverted!). Oscillator The oscillator section is a digital wave generator. In sequencer mode the spread control multiplies the waveform up to 8 waveforms. In keyboard mode the spread control will not affect the oscillator because the 8 waveforms are spread across the touch keyboard to be used as a simple polyphonic synthesizer. Character controls a different effect or folder depending on the mode. The character effects/folders will help you design timbres that will range from clean and glassy to dense and distorted. To change between sequencer and keyboard mode, hold shift and press start. CV IN - control voltage input from eurorack or analogue sequencers mod - attenuation for CV in freq - frequency (to tune the oscillator with your other devices) spread - in sequencer mode this controls the spread of the 8 triangle waves, in live mode this is inactive character - amount of wave folder or effect What else...? We have also added in a sine wave which isn't processed through the spread or folder, giving an extra layer to your sound design Percussion Tied to the fundamental frequency of the main oscillator is a percussive element. The type of synthesis implemented is different for each mode. perc - decay length Mixer A simpler mixer section, feeding into the two filters directly below, comprises of three inputs. One for the oscillator voice, one for the perc voice, and one spare. The spare input can be used to patch in an external signal, utilising the filters. With nothing patched in, the third input is pre-patched as a feedback for the spring reverb (which will overdrive/distort with high gain levels to great effect). voice vol - oscillator voice volume perc vol - percussion element volume IN - channel 3 input jack in vol - channel 3 input volume/pre-patched to spring reverb feedback Filter Two analogue 12db filters, based on our 'fluctuations magnétiques' module. Filter 1 can be switched between high or low pass. Filter 2 is low pass. Using the two filter poles together you can create a bandpass and other interesting filter shapes. This allows for rich, throaty and deep sound sculpting. cutoff - cutoff frequency mod - modulation attenuator MOD - modulation input res - resonance amount hi/low - high pass/low pass switch Modulation Two modulation sources unlock the expressivity of the synth. The first is an envelope, pre-patched to the cutoff on filter 1, and also patched to the VCA. The LFO section is pre-patched to the cutoff of filter 2 and features seven selectable waveforms via the shape function, and an 8th mode which is the sequencer CV out (allowing the sequencer to be patched to other devices). Speed is set using the speed knob. A square output has been included which can be useful for triggering clock resets and other timing functions. A slew in, out and attenuator has also been implemented to further your modulation experiments. Envelope GATE - gate input attack - attack length release - release length ENV - envelope out (pre-patched to MOD of filter 1) LFO triangle shape - LFO main output, LFO shape changes as per selection (pre-patched to MOD of filter 2) square shape - square output which remains square regardless of shape selection speed - LFO speed or frequency shape - select one of seven LFO shapes or sequencer CV out NOISE - noise output linked to LFO speed. Can be used as audio or modulation source SLEW IN - slew input slew - slew amount SLEW OUT - slew output Reverb An analog spring reverb adds bundles of character to the QS, and can be mixed and used to feedback into itself for chaotic overdrives. The reverb section can be used independently of the synth with your other devices, by patching a cable to REV IN, and using the main output. rev input - pre-patched to filter out, this is the reverb gain. It will clip at high levels rev level - reverb amount, higher levels give the impression of a larger space MOD - modulation input for reverb level REV IN - you can use the spring reverb of the QS independently with this input VCA A simple VCA can be patched to the envelope, LFO or external source to amplify the QS. VCA CV - pre-patched to ENV output VCA OUT - pre-patched to REV IN OUT - main mono output to connect to your mixer or audio interface Interfacing (MIDI, CV and audio inputs) We will be including a standard MIDI to 3.5mm adaptor to use in your live or home setup. CV, trigger, clock and reset inputs are also featured to use with eurorack standard devices. Pre-patching We designed the QS for immediate use without having to worry about complex patching, so pre-patching is used to make connections in logical places. Some of these are highlighted using arrows, particularly the modulation sources and connections, the audio routing hasn't been highlighted to keep the design clean, but is explained above. Capacitive touch keyboard To select a mode, hold shift and press the desired key. To change between kayboard and sequencer mode press shift and start. In keyboard mode you can play the keys as a traditional keyboard. Pots 1-8 above the keys tune each step. In sequencer mode, press start to begin the sequencer. Now each key acts as a gate on/off, which triggers the envelope. Active gates are represented with a red LED. Capacitive touch relies on the conductive nature of your body. The keyboard is used in selecting modes, turning on and off sequencer gates and playing the keyboard. Some of the modes also feature pressure sensitivity, allowing for velocity type control of the synthesizer. Memory The QS has no memory to save settings or sequences. The 8 modes are the only form of memory and cannot be overwritten. It is designed this way - as a tool for sketching, patching, jamming and experimentation. You can of course use your favourite sequencer to send clock, notes and gates over MIDI and CV.
  3. In 1970 Ralph Carmichael released the experimental and easy listening record The Electric Symphony. An instrumental album featuring multi-tracked Moog compositions with a conventional rhythm section. Its a well regarded album of synthesizer based music and noted for it's synth programming and track layering. The Moog programming was done by Fred Werner and the music was arranged by Ralph Carmichael and Clark Gassman. the music is critically hailed as up beat and different from it's other contemporaries of the early 1970's.
  4. The Wurlitzer Sideman

    The Rudolph Wurlitzer Company (Wurlitzer) released the first commercially produced drum machine called the Sideman in 1959. It was an "electro-mechanical" drum machine that offered a choice of 12 electronically generated predefined rhythm patterns with variable tempos. "The sound source was a series of vacuum tubes which created 10 preset electronic drum sounds. The drum sounds were 'sequenced' by a rotating disc with metal contacts across its face, spaced in a certain pattern to generate parts of a particular rhythm. Combinations of these different sets of rhythms and drum sounds created popular rhythmic patterns of the day, e.g. waltzes, fox trots etc. These combinations were selected by a rotary knob on the top of the Sideman box. The tempo of the patterns was controlled by a slider that increased the speed of rotation of the disc. The Sideman had a panel of 10 buttons for manually triggering drum sounds, and a remote player to control the machine while playing from an organ keyboard. The Sideman was housed in a wooden cabinet that contained the sound generating circuitry, amplifier and speaker.
  5. This long out-of-print, seminal album from 1980, profoundly influenced futurist ambient sounds and global-minded musical explorers. The gatefold features an essay by Brian Eno and an exclusive interview with Jon Hassell. Remastered on 180gm vinyl with a CD included. Originally released in 1980, Jon Hassell and Brian Eno’s collaborative album “Fourth World Music Vol.I: Possible Musics” is a sound document whose ongoing influence seems beyond dispute. Not only is the album a defining moment in the development of what Eno coined as “Ambient Music” but it also facilitated the introduction of Hassell’s “Future Primitive” trumpet stylings and visionary “Fourth World” musical theories to the broader public. These vectors continue to enrich contemporary audio culture. Eno’s Ambient strategies are now fixed in the DNA of electronic music and the cross-cultural legacy of Hassell’s “Fourth World” concept is apparent not only in the marketplace genre “World Music” but also more persuasively in the accelerating number of digitally driven, borderless musical fusions we now experience. Brian Eno has been an essential fixture of both experimental and popular music since the 1970’s: An art school education; early success as an androgynous synthesizer interventionist with Roxy Music; a run of influential vocal-oriented solo records; the embrace of the term “ambient music” and the application of it to increasingly discreet and oblique electronic instrumental albums; seminal collaborations with David Bowie, The Talking Heads, Robert Fripp and Krautrock pioneers Cluster; and by the mid-80’s chart-topping marquee productions for the Irish rock band U2. Jon Hassell’s musical journey, while more obscured from the cultural mainstream, is every bit as storied and individual as Eno’s. A childhood in Memphis; a classical conservatory education studying the trumpet; composition and electronic music study with Stockhausen in Cologne; a passage through the New York minimalist sphere with Terry Riley, Lamonte Young and Phillip Glass; a singular and radicalized approach to the trumpet developed after a mentorship with the Indian vocal master Pandit Pran Nath; collaborative excursions with The Talking Heads, Peter Gabriel, David Sylvian, Bjork and Ry Cooder; an ongoing questioning of the dichotomies between North and South, sacred and sensual, primitive and futurist. Glitterbeat is proud and honored to re-release and re-introduce this compelling, groundbreaking album.
  6. Jon Hassell - Powerspot

    American composer and trumpeter Jon Hassell is best known for his music of the Fourth World, which he describes as “coffee-colored classical.” The definition becomes clearer once you immerse yourself in the sounds of Power Spot. Hassell’s career is as varied as his education. A student of both Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pandit Pran Nath, he is known for overlooking idiomatic barriers in favor of something far broader. Nath left an indelible mark in Hassell, who turned to the master’s voice for guidance in his own playing. His unmistakable tones are achieved by singing into the instrument, thereby drawing clusters of sounds from a single exhalation. This recording is significant for a number of reasons, not least for indicating a moment in sonic history in which the electro-acoustic universe was beginning to spin some of its richer, more majestic galaxies. The music on Power Spot radiates like a supernova waiting patiently for the traction of celestial bodies to fan its clouds away, revealing softly spinning globes of breath and vapor. With such evocative titles as “Wing Melodies” and “The Elephant And The Orchid,” one feels almost overwhelmed by the range of possible imagery. And yet, like any question of mode or genre thereof, these words disappear behind the music’s waterfall. At first listen the album may seem to blend into a broad wash of sound, but lean in closer and you begin to hear the details emerge. The title track is perhaps the most potent, opening this portal to a wellspring of beats and train whistles. Brian Eno’s amphibian bass slithers through a pond of liquid mercury, fading into the gaseous darkness from which it sprang. Otherworldly connotations are bound to reveal themselves, and nowhere more so than in “Passage D.E.,” which sounds for all like the soundtrack to a documentary of some undiscovered planet. Notable also is “Miracle Steps,” where live percussion provides marked contrast to the synthetic overlay, drawing in the process the album’s most beautiful cartography. Power Spot is one protracted aerial view, a bubbling primordial soup of circuits and blips, funneled through such progressive sense of direction and atmosphere as only Hassell can activate. Unlike much of the knob-turning to grace the many electronic albums of the 80s, its sound is strikingly effusive and organic. In this ocean, one finds that the light of life shines brightest on the inside. It is a light that no clouds can obscure, a light that no darkness can close its eyes around. It is a journey of transience, of transport, of futurism and antiquity, of none of these things. Influential? More than words can say. Just listen to Paul Schütze’s Stateless, or the works of countless others who’ve clearly drunk from the Hassell font.
  7. Topic: Roland D-50

    The Roland D-50 Linear Arithmetic Synthesizer (LA synthesis) was Roland’s first digital synthesizer. It also had a digital filter/effects processor. One of Roland’s best-selling models, this synthesizer also excelled at analog-style sound. View full synthesizer
  8. Roland D-50

    The ROLAND D-50 is very different from any other synthesizer, past or present, and as such heralds the dawn of a new era in synthesis. In the past, synthesizers have progressed through several very diffrent stages. Firstly, there were ANALOG synthesizers, which relied on a variety of components, such as, VCO's, VCF's, and VCA's. These analog building blocks were relatively easy to understand and program , and they could produce sounds of remarkable warmth and character. However, when it came to accurately simulating acoustic sounds, the process could easily become too involved. On the other hand, the next breed of synthesizers, known as digital synthesizers, could easily simulate acoustic sounds, yet they were far more difficult to program. Furthermore, the digital technology behind these instruments seemed to imply that a different type of sound should occur. In general, just as an analog synthesizer would be described as "warm", in character, the digital counterpart was very often "thin". Essentially, the two types complemented each other, one being easy to program, the other capable of accurate simulation. The ROLAND D-50 has now changed all that. Thanks to a new custom designed Integrated Circuit known as the 'LA CHIP'. Here, LA stands for Linear Arithmetic synthesis which is the heart of the new technology. LA synthesis involves a great many technological advances resulting not only in a superior sound quality but also an improved ease of programming. In this way, Roland has succeeded in maintaining a high degree of familiarity to the user despite the technical wizardry involved. However, the true power of LA Synthesis lies within the digital Synthesizer section of the D— 50. Remember, first of all, that this is a totally digital instrument, even though the sound would seem to suggest far more. Through LA synthesis, the D— 50 appears to have four powerful synthesizers built in. Each of these hypothetical synthesizers could behave like a conventional analog syntheizer, or a PCM sampled synthesizer. Consequently, they are referred to as PARTIALS, since they are far more than just a pure synthesizer. These Partials are combined in pairs to form a TONE. A Tone could either be a mix of the two Partials, or they could take advantage of the LA version of cross modulation. In this way, some of today's more popular digital sounds are remarkably easy to achieve.
  9. EMS Spectre Video Synthesizer

    The Video Synthesiser, originally released as the Spectron, from EMS was an "Innovative Video Synthesiser" using analogue and digital techniques. The Spectre is a hybrid video synthesiser which uses the EMS patchboard system to allow completely flexible connections between module inputs and outputs. The video signals were digital, but they were controlled by analogue voltages. There was a digital patch board for image composition and an analogue patchboard for motion control. For any educational institution, Spectre will be invaluable as a tool for teaching principles of design, colour, and concepts of digital logic. Students can create works which are easily stored, permanently or temporarily, on videotape, and can be duplicated as easily as with audio recordings. For artists and video production studios, the applications are obvious. As well as being able to perform special effects with less hardware than is usual, Spectre can be used as a live performance instrument, for which there is no comparable system presently available. In industry, Spectre will be extremely useful in fields such as fabric and wallpaper design, where a simple photograph of the monitor screen would substitute for painstaking artist's renditions. Black and white images of products or advertisements can be colourized, and particular colours or combinations thereof substituted or recalled in an instant. To add to its commercial applications, Spectre is entertaining as well as useful. Its accessibility to even the most inexperienced of users will make it a unique attraction in any situation where entertainment is sought. All patching of functions in Spectre is done by means of pin board matrix connections. Signals coming out of functions appear at horizontal positions (rows) and inputs to functions, as well as to the final output, are at vertical positions (columns). Outputs are labelled at the left side of the pin matrix, inputs at the top. In order to produce an image on the monitor screen, signals must eventually reach the input columns of either Output A or Output B on the Digital Signal Matrix. Spectre has three types of digital output - luminance, colour 1 and colour 2 - which combine to send particular signal levels to the video output. There are 16 levels of luminance, & eight levels of each colour, making a total of 64 colour possibilities at any of 16 luminance levels. It is by manipulating the digital signals that produce these levels that we form images on the monitor screen.
  10. Moog Minitaur

    The Minitaur is the newest addition to the Taurus family of Analog Bass Synthesizers. It is an inconspicuously compact, subharmonic bass machine designed to integrate seamlessly into any performance or computer-based music workflow. Just as its progenitors, the Minitaur effortlessly does one thing above all others… wall splitting analog BASS. View full synthesizer
  11. Moog Minitaur

    For over 40 years, the Moog Taurus has been the secret weapon of artists and producers around the globe for generating earth-shaking bass. The Minitaur is the newest addition to the Taurus family of Analog Bass Synthesizers. It is an inconspicuously compact, subharmonic bass machine designed to integrate seamlessly into any performance or computer-based music workflow. Just as its progenitors, the Minitaur effortlessly does one thing above all others… wall splitting analog BASS. The solid steel enclosure of the Minitaur is deceptively simple - offering immediate access to critical sound design and performance controls only. This makes Minitaur extremely fast and easy to use--but just under the surface lies a vast expanse of dynamic and inspirational power that is instantly accessible from almost any laptop or MIDI controller. The free Minitaur Editor/Librarian software truly unlocks Minitaur’s power and flexibility by making DAW integration and control completely seamless on both Mac and Windows machines. Load and save up to 128 presets onto your Minitaur, select from 6 different modulation waveshapes, engage Hard Sync, access full ADSR envelopes, MIDI sync the LFO, reset oscillator waveform cycles, polychain with other Moog synthesizers and more. Every feature can be manipulated, automated and recalled instantly. NEW FEATURES with 2.2 Firmware update: • SAVE AND RECALL UP TO 128 ONBOARD PRESETS - Select and save directly from your Minitaur’s front panel, via MIDI controller or with the free Minitaur Editor / Librarian software. • FREE EDITOR/LIBRARIAN SOFTWARE - Seamless DAW integration now with full Windows support! • 5 NEW MODULATION SOURCES (Tri, Sqr, Saw, Ramp, S&H and Filter EG) • HARD SYNC - Access a completely new sonic palette with your Minitaur • MODULATE OSCILLATOR 2 ONLY - Pair with Hard Sync for syncopated metallic sweeps and surges • ASSIGNABLE CV/GATE INPUTS - Control any feature on or under the hood of your Minitaur via control voltage. • CV TO MIDI CONVERSION - Bring control voltage into your DAW for analog control over digital circuits.
  12. Futuresonus Parva

    Introducing a revolutionary new synthesizer combining the classic warmth of analog synthesis with the convenience of digital control 100% ANALOG SOUND From the oscillators and wave-shapers to the voltage-controlled filters (VCF) and snappy OTA-based voltage-controlled amplifiers (VCA), Parva's signal path is 100% analog. There's no DSP here. POLYPHONIC & MULTI-TIMBRAL Eight note polyphonic. Eight voice multi-timbral. Amazingly flexible. DIGITAL CONTROL Save and recall patches instantaneously, change parameters via MIDI, and route LFOs and envelopes to more than 40 destinations in the modulation matrix. USB HOST Parva is the first analog synthesizer to feature a USB Host port, which allows you to connect any class-compliant USB MIDI keyboard — or other controller — directly, without the need for a computer. Parva uses a consistent approach to selecting and editing information. There are three basic movements - turning, clicking (briefly pressing and releasing), and holding (pressing and holding until the display changes) a knob. Take a few moments to become familiar with the menus and controls. The black knobs offer direct access to the most commonly used parameters. No matter what else is currently being displayed, turning a black knob with show the parameter and it’s value as it changes. The only exception is the Master Volume knob in the upper right corner. No value is displayed when that knob is adjusted. The silver OSC, ENV, LFO, VCF, A, and B knobs are clickable rotary encoders used to navigate their respective menus. Turn the knob to scroll through the available menu options or adjust a value. Click the knob to toggle the currently selected option. Press and hold to return to the previous menu. OSCILLATORS 3 Digitally-controlled analog oscillators per voice Sawtooth, triangle, and PWM waveforms Variable-width saw waves Tunable +/- 5 octaves Hard Syncable Independent level controls ENVELOPES 4 4-stage (ADSR) envelopes per voice Exponential curves for punchy attack and natural decay Linear mode also available Loopable evenelopes Routable to >40 destinations MODULATION 4 LFOs per voice Sine, sawtooth, triangle, and square waveforms Random sample-and-hold Stepped LFOs Free-running or key-synced Routable to >40 destinations Polyphonic Aftertouch FILTERS 2 configurable voltage-controlled filters per voice 24db or 12db low-pass or high-pass modes 12db bandpass mode Self-oscillating Filter FM INPUTS / OUTPUTS Individual 1/4" stereo line-level outputs for each voice 1/4" left and right main outputs Stereo 1/4" headphone jack MIDI input and ouput USB port for MIDI input and output USB Host port for direct connection of USB MIDI controllers DIMENSIONS 10.5" x 8" x 3.5" (26.7cm x 20.3cm x 8.9cm)
  13. Timewind - Klaus Schulze

    Timewind is the fifth album by Klaus Schulze. It was originally released in 1975, and in 2006 was the twenty-second Schulze album reissued by Revisited Records. It is Schulze's first solo album to use a sequencer. For many years this was his only work available in the United States and was therefore rated higher by American listeners than 1977's Mirage or X of the following year. It was awarded the Grand Prix du Disque (Grand Prize for Records) of L'Académie Charles Cros. Evolving slowly but deliberately over the course of each album side, Timewind has been deemed an electronic version of an Indian raga. It resembles in many ways a longer variation of the third track from Tangerine Dream's classic 1974 album Phaedra, "Movements of a Visionary," but it remains a transitional work somewhere between the Krautrock of Schulze's earlier output and the Berlin School character of his following efforts. The intention of Timewind was to invoke a timeless state in the listener. Both track titles are references to the nineteenth-century composer Richard Wagner. Bayreuth is the Bavarian town where Wagner had an opera house built for the first performance of his massive Ring Cycle. Wahnfried is the name of Wagner's home in Bayreuth in the grounds of which he was buried in 1883. It is also a pen-name used by Schulze himself. "Bayreuth Return" was recorded on a two-track equipment in one take, and is essentially "live in the studio". Its rhythmic basis is a single analog sequencer pattern, transposed and manipulated in real time. (The manipulation primarily consists of changing the 'return' point of the sequence.) String synthesizer chords, improvised melodies, and complex sound effects are the remaining ingredients. "Wahnfried 1883", in contrast, is a slow piece that was composed and multitracked. Its main building blocks are layers of slow, shimmering pads and lines. The kaleidoscopic key changes without obvious 'home key' (the piece remains consonant throughout) may be seen as a musical nod to Wagner: also, a Leitmotif appears. An excerpt of the graphic performance score appears on the inside sleeve of the original vinyl version. The reissue bonus track "Echoes of Time" is a longer alternate take of "Bayreuth Return".
  14. Roland TB-03 Bass line Synthesizer

    The battery-powered TB-03 is a direct descendant of the famous TB-303 Bass Line Synth. The layout and controls are unchanged, so it works just like the original. It sounds like it too, thanks to Roland’s advanced ACB technology that recreates the hypnotic liquid grooves of the magic silver box. But the new TB-03 goes even further, with several enhancements not found on the original model. The four-digit LED display makes programming easier and more accurate, while overdrive and delay effects let you unleash a twisted, tribal wall of sound to send the crowd into a frenzy. Back in the studio, the TB-03 can send control information via MIDI or its USB port, the latter of which also functions as a audio interface. You know when you hear a TB-303—a hypnotic, tribal sound that works best in dark, crowded rooms with big sound systems. Using the same ACB (Analog Circuit Behavior) technology from the acclaimed AIRA series, the TB-03 accurately emulates the expressive, slippery sound of its older brother, and even adds a few surprises. Saw and square waveforms are available, along with all of the rotary control knobs that help shape the 303’s unique character, including tuning, cutoff, resonance, envelop mod, decay, and accent. If you’re familiar with the TB-303’s programming method, then you’ll feel right at home with the TB-03. The original Pitch and Time write modes are included, along with an all-new Step mode. Pattern programming is also enhanced by the LED display, which shows the current step in the sequence as well as showing fine tempo values (such as 125.5 BPM). The internal sequencer can be triggered externally via the trigger input, and you can even switch between write and play modes without stopping pattern playback, opening up new possibilities for live performance. Some of the best music is made away from the studio, so the Roland Boutique series runs on 4 x AA batteries, ready for when inspiration strikes. Alternatively, the TB-03 can run on USB bus power. The TB-03 includes several enhancements over the original TB-303. Firstly, the four-digit LED display makes programming easier and more detailed, since you now have a visual representation of the value being edited. Then there are a variety of overdrive, delay, and reverb effects that dramatically change the mood and tone of the TB-03, going from smooth to spiky to squealing. Programming patterns is also easier thanks to newly added functions that include step write, shuffle, and fine tempo control. Finally, the inclusion of MIDI and USB ports mean that the TB-03 can send and receive control information and connect easily to computer-based DAWs. The TB-03 includes MIDI IN/OUT ports and USB, allowing control information to be exchanged with other instruments and devices. This turns the TB-03 into a versatile controller, especially as you can use the CV/Gate output to control external analog gear and modular synthesizers. This level of control works both ways, thanks to the trigger input that lets external gear drive the TB-03’s internal sequencer. Once connected to a PC or Mac, both audio and MIDI data can be sent through the USB port. Via its USB port, the TB-03 functions as a high-quality audio interface, providing a simple and reliable way of recording directly to your DAW application. You can keep your favorite settings and sequencer patterns safe too via the USB data backup function.
  15. Moog Sub Phatty

    Moog Music’s engineers have crafted the Sub Phatty’s oscillators to perform with extreme accuracy and require almost no warm-up time. Just power up, dial in your settings, and put your fingers to work on the keys to summon crisp and detailed waveforms, a vibrant and articulate sound that more than honors the rich sonic density synonymous with Moog creations. The Sub Phatty is the first analog synth to feature Moog’s transformative new Multidrive section; at low settings Multidrive adds warmth and girth, but when pushed, it delivers a screaming snarl that is highly reactive to resonance, waveshape, and oscillator level. Experiment with this new circuit and unlock an undiscovered world of vivid analog tonalities. The mixer section offers innovations of its own, including a sub oscillator that outputs a square wave one octave below Oscillator 1. Use this powerful tool as a third oscillator for added depth, or to craft your own customized incarnation of monstrous Moog bass. Also in the mixer section is a noise generator voiced to deliver low-frequency content, rich with body and punch. If your goal is to sculpt analog percussion and sound effects, look no further. The Sub Phatty features a wide range of parameters just below the surface, and all features are easily accessible from the instrument’s front panel, or via the free standalone/plugin editor. Select filter poles, assign wave mod destinations, or specify pitch bend amounts — it’s all there. The Sub Phatty brings a fearless new voice to the Moog family of synthesizers. With its streamlined interface and dynamic sound design flexibility, this new synth fuses an unparalleled connection between human & machine, opening the door to unprecedented sonic exploration.
  16. EMS Synthi A

    The SYNTHI has a great variety of applications and it can be connected to many different kinds of electrical devices. It was designed with the following applications in mind. As a live performance instrument, connected to power amplifiers, generating its own sounds and modifying sounds from microphones. guitars. etc. As the main unit of an electronic music studio; one SYNTHI and two tape-recorders provide a flexible small studio, to which other devices can be added without difficulty. As a teaching aid the SYNTHI can demonstrate most acoustics phenomena very easily. It can be operated without risk by students, and can be used with any convenient indicating or recording device. The great flexibility of the SYNTHI comes from its basic design- unlike a television set or tape-recorder, in which the components are permanently connected to perform a specific function, the SYNTHI has about a dozen different devices which you connect together according to your particular need. The examples given in this Manual are intended to help you "get the feel" of the SYNTH!, and cover only a tiny fraction of its capabilities. In order to use the SYNTHI intelligently, it is necessary to understand what the devices do, and how several devices may be connected to work in combination. In this section the general ideas will be explained, and in the sections following these ideas will be applied to examples that you can try on the SYNTHI. The VCS3 and the SYNTHI A are very similar electrically. most of the differences being in the external design. The DK Keyboard has a similar finish to the VCS3 and the SYNTHI Keyboard is housed in a case matching the SYNTHI A for convenient transportation. The Keyboards are similar in concept but differ slightly in their controls: both are explained in It is possible to use the SYNTHI by itself, but you will probably want to use it as the basic unit of a more complex system. The SYNTHI is easily connected to almost all microphones, amplifiers, electric musical instruments and tape-recorders, and in addition there are special purpose peripherals made by E.M.S. Devices in the SYNTHI are of three basic kinds. First there is the source, or generator; this produces a signal without requiring an input, and so we represent it diagrammatically with an arrow coming out of a box. The SYNTHI has three Oscillators and a Noise Generator as its primary sources — the filter becomes a source when it is made to oscillate. and the Trapezoid output from the Envelope Shaper is also a source. The next kind of device is a treatment or process. This modifies one or more signals that are put into it. and we represent it diagrammati-cally as a box with arrows going into it and an arrow coming out of it: The Filter, Envelope Shaper. Ring Modulator, Reverberation Unit, and Amplifiers are all treat-ments on the SYNTHI. It is sometimes convenient to think of the Input Amplifiers as a "source" to the SYNTHI, but strictly they are treatments of the signal provided by a microphone, tape-recorders, etc. The third kind of device is an output device, and is the ultimate destination of the signal. Many device can be connected, such as power amplifiers, tape-recorders, other synthesizers, light-shows, etc All of these devices can be controlled by the knobs on the front of the SYNTHI. It is also possible to operate the controls electrically, and it is this fact which makes the SYNTHI so flexible. The devices themselves can turn the knobs, as it were. The SYNTHI does not distinguish Signal Voltages and Control Voltages, but a is important that you do. Typically Control Voltages are of lower frequency than Signal Voltages. It is not possible to hear sounds of frequencies lower than about 25Hz (Hz means ''oscillations per second") but a Control Voltage might be at a frequency of 8Hz (for a vibrato effect). or 1 oscillation per minute (for a slow fade). or 0Hz (i.e. constant) for a pitch determined from the keyboard. Sounds are made by connecting the devices together. In order to listen to an oscillator. we connect it to an amplifier and a loudspeaker. Although this is a very simple circuit (it requires only one pin on the patchboard of the SYNTHI) it is already capable of providing any audible pitch at a wide range of intensities —using manual control. since the Control Inputs are not connected yet.
  17. EMS Synthi AKS

    The EMS Synthi A, first available in May 1971, and then in March 1972 a version of it with a built-in keyboard and sequencer, the EMS Synthi AKS, a portable modular analog synthesizer made by EMS of England. Most notable for its patch pin matrix, its functions, and internal design are similar to the VCS 3 synthesizer, also made by EMS. EMS is still run by Robin Wood in Cornwall, and in addition to continuing to build and sell new units, the company repairs and refurbishes EMS equipment. The Synthi AKS has been used extensively by Brian Eno in his art rock and ambient albums. He particularly made prominent use of its signal-chain editing capability in order to add color to his own voice as well as Robert Fripp and Phil Manzanera's guitar work. His early band, Roxy Music, supposedly requested that he join them after watching him tinker with the Synthi AKS for only a few minutes. When launched in 1972, the Synthi AKS retailed for around £450. There was an optional three octave (37 note) DK1 monophonic keyboard available for it, later the DK2 (Dynamic Keyboard 2) was available, this allowed independent control of two Oscillators, thus enabling the player to play two notes together. As with the VCS3, a Synthi AKS was worth considerably more than its original price by the late 1970s. The first 30 Synthi AKs featured a black and silver Touch pad, Spin-and-touch random note selector and an unplayable resistive touch sensitive keyboard. This was replaced by the familiar blue capacitive touch sensitive keyboard with integrated sequencer.
  18. EMS VCS3 The Putney

    Electronic Music Studios first commercial product the VCS3 also known as The Putney is a portable synthesizer introduced in 1969.It was housed in a solid Afromosia cabinet housed the following modules interconnected by means of a matrix patchboard. The VCS3 was more or less the first portable commercially available synthesizer—portable in the sense that the VCS 3 was housed entirely in a small, wooden case, unlike previous machines from American manufacturers such as Moog Music, ARP and Buchla which were housed in large cabinets and were known to take up entire rooms.
  19. Korg ARP Odyssey Rev 1 Duophonic Synthesizer

    The original ARP Odyssey was a 2 VCO duo-phonic instrument. Its most distinctive feature was its sharp, penetrating sound and its rich range of tonal variation. With a variety of functions and modulation possibilities provided by oscillator sync, sample & hold, pulse width modulation, high-pass filter, two types of envelope generator, and pitch bend using the PPC, it was able to create a versatile range of sounds. The ARP Odyssey reproduces the sounds of these components at the circuit level. Under the supervision of David Friend, parts were carefully selected and every detail was adjusted to replicate the original unit's distinctive synthesis. Broadly speaking, there were three versions of the original ARP Odyssey, divided by the date of production, with the major difference being the filter circuit. The ARP Odyssey provides all three of these different filter circuits, and allows you to select one of them with a single switch. Rev1 is a 12 dB/Oct circuit that produces a sharp, punchy sound. The ARP Odyssey has been downsized to 86% of the original ARP Odyssey. Carefully selected parts are used in the familiar slider section, providing an operating feel that's even smoother than the original. The keyboard uses a 37-note slim keyboard that features lighter weight and excellent playability. While making the instrument more compact and easier to use, we have also paid attention to ensuring that the mini-keyboard is uncompromisingly "playable." Although the keyboard has 37 keys, the transpose function lets it cover a broad range of seven octaves. New Drive switch In order to deliver a more powerful analog sound, a DRIVE switch is provided as a new function. Turning this switch on makes the VCA distort, generating a rough and raw sound. Added connectors such as MIDI and headphone output The connectors provided on the original ARP Odyssey differed by production date, but based on Rev3 of the original, the ARP Odyssey brings the specifications up to a modern standard. In addition to a MIDI IN connector and USB-MIDI port, we've added a headphone jack with adjustable volume (*). The XLR output jacks which had been unbalanced have been changed to noise-resistant balanced outputs. Patch cables included Quarter-inch and mini-size patch cables are included. If you connect a patch cable from the newly added headphone jack to the external audio input jack, you can produce a powerful sound by applying self-feedback. If you connect the GATE OUT jack to the TRIG IN jack, the EG won't be retriggered, allowing you to play legato. A dedicated semi-hard case that's ideal for storage and transportation is included. It sports the classical ARP logo, and has a sophisticated finish in a black tone. The corrugated shell structure ensures excellent impact resistance, and internal cushioning and pocket for small items is also provided.
  20. Moog Minimoog Model D

    The Minimoog is a monophonic analog synthesizer was released in 1970 by R.A. Moog Inc. It was designed in response to the use of synthesizers in rock and pop music. Now players could have the essential sound of the synthesizer in a portable case. Now players could have the essential sound of the synthesizer in a portable case. The Minimoog was designed to include the most important parts of a modular synthesizer in a smaller case and with the user not having to use patch cables to set up a sound. Long out of production but still used in modern contemporary music and beyond.
  21. Akai S612 MIDI Digital Sampler

    The Akai MIDI Digital Sampler S612 is an amazingly sophisticated electronic instrument which enables you to record (sample) any kind of sound, and reproduce it at any desired pitch or pitches. The following are only a few examples of the many sounds that the S612 can sample. Sounds of acoustic musical instruments (such as pianos, strings or percussion instruments). Sounds of nature (such as sounds made by animals, wind, wild birds and rain). Human voices, radio, television, CDs, analogue records, me chanical noises, etc. With the S612, you are able to perform musically with ease using a wide variety of sound sources (only a few of which are listed above). The acoustic instruments can be sampled and reproduced as realistically as the original sound. Existing synthesizers, up to now among the most advanced electronic musical instruments, are unable to sample and reproduce in this way. The S612 offers entirely new and unique ways to express your musical creativity. Realization of super high quality sound by 12-bit sampling technology. 6-voice polyphonic performance is possible in connection with MIDI keyboards, synthesizers, sequencers and many others. Realization of sampling time up to eight seconds. A short sampled sound can be continuously played with no time restrictions and without sounding awkward. The S612 contains an advanced scanning mode system with "looping" and "alternating" modes. The best splicing point for "looping" can be selected instantly by the automatic splicing system. A splicing point can be selected at any time by switching to the manual splice mode. Because the starting or ending point of the sample can be selected at any time, it is possible to play the sound after elimination of an undesired portion of the sample. It is also possible to reproduce the sample in reverse. It is possible to overdub samples and accumulate various sounds infinitely. The S612 is equipped with an L.F.O., which can add vibrato effects with a delay. The S612 is also equipped with continuous variable low-pass filters for adding a milder touch to samples. 2.8 inch sample disks can be used for data files. "Save" and "load" procedures are extremely quick. You can continuously build your own tone sample library with the specially designed Sampler Disk Drive MD280. (optional) Any type of sound can be tuned to a designated pitch by transposing it by a half step. This can also be done by tuning ±100 cent. The sound can then be stored on a disk. The S612 is rack mountable (EIA/2U type) for excellent operation in the studio as well as at live performances. It can be handled with ease and offers astonishing performance.
  22. Korg DS-8 FM Synthesizer

    The Korg DS-8 is an expandable FM synthesizer released by KORG in 1986 which used the Yamaha FM synthesis engine with 2-Op oscillators. 61 Keys in length with both initial and switchable aftertouch capabilities it stores up to 100 programs and 10 combinations in its internal memory. By using one of the optional non-volatile (but battery-powered) KORG RAM cards MCR-01, MCR-02, or MCR-03 this program memory can be expanded by extra programs and combinations: 100/10 for the MCR-01, 200/20 for the MCR-02, or 400/40 for the MCR-03. Programs can be backed up and received via standard MIDI dumps. The DS-8 features one joystick controller for bending pitch, timbre and modulation speed, one card slot for aforementioned KORG RAM Cards, MIDI IN/OUT/THRU jacks, a damper pedal, assignable pedal, assignable switch, program up pedal, one balance slider, four keyboard modes (Single, Layer, Double and Multi) and two slider controls which indicate the ability to edit the two oscillators from fast to slow. The three editable banks shown on the right side of the board (Function, Voice Parameter and Combi Parameter) provide multiple ways in which the user can edit the programs, banks and patches. At $1400 RRP the DS-8 was a revolutionary, cheap and affordable product for its time.
  23. Korg Wavestation - Aquila2

  24. softPop

    BASTL Instruments softPop
  25. S1000 Stereo Digital Sampler

    Akai Professional S1000 Stereo Digital Sampler