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CIIIGoff

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Everything posted by CIIIGoff

  1. A Visit To The Raymond Scott Sound Archive


    There exists at the University Of Missouri in Kansas City a huge research library of sound recordings, called the "Marr Sound Archive."  My wife, Karen, and I took a little trip there on Monday, June 4, to listen to a few rare tapes made by the legendary Raymond Scott.  We had a unique and very pleasant experience.

    The Marr Archive houses copies of millions of records, cylinders, tapes, CDs, digital audio files -- all sizes, shapes, lengths, etc. -- all types of artists from all over the world.  There are several "special" collections there as well, including the most extensive collection of Raymond Scott recordings anywhere.  The Scott collection contains not only commercially-released productions, but lots and lots of one-of-a-kind items recorded on lathe cut lacquer disks and reel to reel tapes -- radio shows, practice sessions, electronic sound experiments, etc.

    Raymond Scott  was a genius musician and arranger, and was also the inventor of some of the earliest electronic synthesizers.  His work influenced artists all over the world from the 1930's to the 1980's, and continues to do so today.  His jazz and orchestral recordings are quirky and inventive; some have become permanently embedded in the public consciousness due to Warner Brothers purchasing and adapting them as soundtracks for Looney Toons.  In the 1940's, Scott started creating all sorts of electronic instruments and playing around with recording technology, producing sounds that human beings had never heard (nor imagined) before.  For more extensive background on Scott, go here:

    Official Raymond Scott Website

    The Marr Archive is a research library, and the staff is very mindful of copyrights. Appointments for listening must be arranged in advance, and listening is only allowed in-house (no internet audio files are available).  For the sake of preserving rare recordings, guests don't get to handle original materials and only get to listen to digitized audio.   Many of the Scott recordings at the library have been digitized, but some haven't, and if you want to hear something that isn't digitized, you are obliged to pay $70/hour for a technician to digitize it for you.  To offset all of these rules, the staff at the archive is very helpful and welcoming to guests, which makes a trip to the library a fun and easy experience (at least it was for us).   For more information about the Raymond Scott collection, go here: 

    Marr Archive Raymond Scott Collection 

    Karen and I arranged to hear four recordings while we were there -- about 1 1/2 hours of material.   The library specialist with whom I arranged our visit, Andrew Hansbrough, had prepared a computer terminal with the materials I requested, but he went well beyond that in welcoming us to the Marr Archive.  He gave us a personal tour of the entire place.  This included demonstrations of some very ancient sound equipment and of the GIANT robot system that retrieves huge palettes of recordings from a vault that extends up several floors into a huge dark void.  Among other unique items, he showed us some 20 inch disks made of lacquer on glass during the 1940's (the USA needed all its metal for the war effort back then).   Really nice guy!

    The recordings that Karen and I heard included tapes of experiments made with various versions of Scott's "Electronium" and one tape of advertisement out takes from 1960.  None of this stuff has ever been made available to the general public outside of the Marr Archive.  The electronium materials were as engaging as any electronic music I've ever heard, ranging in form from rhythmic sounds, to lovely washes, to complete dissonant wildness.  The 1960 adverts we heard were obviously being arranged on the spot with some very talented musicians -- the same products (and verbiage) being presented and re-presented in all sorts of genres and styles to determine how best to sell them.

    Special thanks to Encyclotronic's Jack Hertz for placing the Raymond Scott Sound Archive into my awareness several months ago -- this is truly something that all Kansas City musicians and recording artists should know about and visit!

     

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    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Wowie! I am so glad you managed to make out there. What an amazing thing. I am going to have to visit one of these days. Really and truly, I will. 

      If you liked that. Maybe you can make it to the Festival in September?

       

  2. CIIIGoff

    Jack Hertz Planet Red Live

    OOO... Neat-o! Break a Martian leg and have fun; I'll try to toon in -- just wondering about your promo sign though -- is "Stanta Cruz" that cool boardwalk town on the coast of Amazonis Planitia?
  3. CIIIGoff

    Moog Grandmother Semi-Modular Analog Synthesizer

    Mr. Hertz -- will be attending the M Fest? If so, will you be making a report(z) to the readers here? This piece of equipment is appealing; I love the Micromoog-ish presentation and the pretty colors -- if only you could get all the Encyclotronic members to chip in a little $ and hold a raffle... ah, there I am dreaming again...
  4. CIIIGoff

    Underview Of A Phenomenon

    On February 4, 2017, Michael LaGrega and C. Goff III got together at LaGrega's studio in Leawood, Kansas, to record some percussion improvisations. They planned to refine these recordings into edits akin to sonic skeletal supports, on which musical accompaniments could be hung at a later date. The battery of instrumentation used in this session included a wide variety of percussion instruments and non-instruments, some synthesized percussive sound generators, and a few electronic sound modifiers. Of all the recordings produced that day, only the one offered here possessed qualities that distinguished it as a complete work that could stand on its own. An edit of this piece was provided to Scott Raymond in June, 2017, for airplay on WVKR in Fishkill, New York. Goff produced the version presented here in April, 2018. Is this Fourth World music? Or perhaps Fifth World music? Only the listener will know...
  5. CIIIGoff

    Topic: Underview Of A Phenomenon

    On February 4, 2017, Michael LaGrega and C. Goff III got together at LaGrega's studio in Leawood, Kansas, to record some percussion improvisations. They planned to refine these recordings into edits akin to sonic skeletal supports, on which musical accompaniments could be hung at a later date. The battery of instrumentation used in this session included a wide variety of percussion instruments and non-instruments, some synthesized percussive sound generators, and a few electronic sound modifiers. Of all the recordings produced that day, only the one offered here possessed qualities that distinguished it as a complete work that could stand on its own. An edit of this piece was provided to Scott Raymond in June, 2017, for airplay on WVKR in Fishkill, New York. Goff produced the version presented here in April, 2018. Is this Fourth World music? Or perhaps Fifth World music? Only the listener will know... View full album
  6. Total non sequitur here... Here I am in a post-oral-surgery haze, reading today's Jack H. posts... This is what I saw when I read this one: Special Morphine Addictive Synthesizer. Made me think, yeah, back to the 1970's we go go go! Now it's back to reality; I know it's around here somewhere...
  7. CIIIGoff

    ARCHIVING! What, How, and Where do you back up your music?

    Ha! I really don't have much GOOD advice regarding your boxes, cabinets, wallets, shelves, etc. The sad facts are: 1) Whatever sort of wallets, sleeves, disk holders I have gotten fond of for durability, thickness, ease of including some sort of standard-sized paper insert, etc.... they seem to only be manufactured the same exact way by the same manufacturer for a couple of years -- so I got disks stuffed into all sorts of sleeves now -- top loading, side loading, two sided, one sided, flimsy, sturdy, different colors, you name it... The same is true for "wallet" designs -- I got lots of different sizes, shapes, capacities. A problem with all this variety is finding a storage place where they all can fit together and can be accessed with relative ease. And sadly, the one sort of storage thing that HAS survived over all the years is the absolutely crappiest of all -- the jewel case. The guy who designed this thing should be punished -- they break, crack, don't open well, are really a pain to add album art to, often the album art is ruined because it doesn't fit properly into the little niches, and they are way too thick compared to the disks themselves (so they take up a whole lot of space when stored). How this piece of dung design has remained popular for over 30 years is a true miracle of marketing power, because it's an awful example of engineering... 2) And no matter what I've tried to do with various organizing schemes, there's always a ton of exceptions. Put all the albums I've done with Person A in one zone, put the albums with Person B in another, -- then what about the ones that feature both Person A and Person B? Put all the albums with one recording group together, let's say Herd Of The Ether Space -- there's a lot of these -- organize them by year -- but some have been remastered, so whenever I make a new version, must I move some disks out of their original wallets to make room for the remastered disks to be stored with the originals? or should I put all the remastered albums together in a separate wallet? Do you remember where you put those remastered ones? Sometimes it's a real treasure hunt around here. So you see, I'm constantly challenged regarding organizing my recordings. I muddle through as best I can, but I have yet to find a true solution to this puzzle. I encourage anyone with some good advice on this matter to share it, PLEASE! Again, Good Luck Jack
  8. CIIIGoff

    ARCHIVING! What, How, and Where do you back up your music?

    Yes, lots of space, lots of time, is it worth it? When I moved to KS from CA back in 96, I left nearly every reel-to-reel tape (hundreds) and my reel-to-reel recorders with my CA collaborators -- big mistake... One died, sadly, and I don't know what happened to his collection. Another sold his set at a flea market... Sheesh... Anyway, I've still got many large boxes full of cassettes, including tapes with most of the raw materials from which albums were hatched. I still go back and find hidden gems in these, so YES, this is worth it. As for digital recordings, I do have disks with some raw materials on them, but most of that stuff now gets deleted once master edits are created from them. I have made about 300 albums over the years. All the master files, including cover art, out takes, etc., are stored on external hard drives and on DVDs (both places for each item). The albums themselves are also all backed up on CDRs. Same is true for videos and photographs/graphics and literature (I do a lot of types of art). Every year I go through my computer to make disk copies of everything I did over the previous 12 months or so. I'm actually working on this year's collection right now. It usually takes several hours of several days to complete. Also, most of my recordings and videos are available on the internet at archive.org in some form, so if the tornado hits my house, that's another safeguard for preserving my work in some way. I figure of all the places on the internet, the archive has been around the longest and seems like the best that the net offers in terms of longevity (it's also free to use, YEAH!). Yes, all the disks and tapes take up space, and sometimes I get confused about where things are, but I've got peace of mind about all this. I'm guessing that all the hard copies will be trashed after my passing, and some day the internet archive will become obsolete -- but I also know that in the big picture, the sun's gonna blow up like a balloon and swallow the earth one day, and I'm guessing the rest of the universe might be thinking "good riddance" when that happens. Good luck with your archiving! I hope whatever solution you come up with gives you peace of mind and leaves a little space in your house for you to live in too...
  9. CIIIGoff

    Visa by Duncan Mackay

    One of my fave keyboard twiddlers -- especially love his Cockney Rebel days...
  10. CIIIGoff

    The Raymond Scott Festival

    until

    Huh... synergy here... just last Friday I contacted the curator folks at the Raymond Scott collection in Kansas City to find out how I could make a visit to hear some rare recordings of his... I had no idea about the 110 birthday thing. September is a long way off. I hope to make a visit to the KC collection long before that. Very doubtful I'll make it to festival though, unfortunately, although it sounds like fun!
  11. CIIIGoff

    Korg DS-8 FM Synthesizer

    RAM or ROM... There is a card, looks like a super flexi (almost too fragile) credit card, that loads four big collections of synth sounds into the keyboard. That's what I'm referring to here. I don't see any enlighteningly descriptive references that detail this card in the description above, which seems a bit weird, since it's a pretty important piece of the puzzle to get this thing working. I don't even see a photo above of the slot in the front/left part of the keyboard where the card gets inserted... And... there is no where on my keyboard (nor detailed in any of the photos above either) to insert any sort of fatter, battery-powered "cartridge." Perhaps I'm just too tech-stoopid to interpret the KORG lingo here. So be it. What is important to me is that when I insert my own card a litttle off-center, miracles of noises are created that I'm pretty sure no one at the factory intended me to hear. This is a good thing from my perspective as an experimental artist. Try it if you have a DS-8.
  12. CIIIGoff

    Korg DS-8 FM Synthesizer

    I once found out quite by accident that if you do not insert the RAM card snuggly into the slot, a wide variety of non-factory-made, very unusual, sounds can be produced by this old gem. The reference here to a "battery powered" card, however, puzzles me. No batteries on my card, nor can I figure out where exactly a battery could possibly even be located on it. Hmmm...
  13. The name of this album translates to "God Bless America" in English. Each piece is an unrehearsed improvisation. The United States currently allows its citizens to create and share experimental audio artworks. One and all are encouraged to celebrate this album today, because who knows what might happen to it tomorrow? Track 1, English Translation: "the biggest crowd ever" Recorded January 2, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Track 2, English Translation: "very stable genius" Recorded January 17, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Track 3, English Translation: "no collusion" Recorded January 2, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Track 4, English Translation: "grab them by the pussy" Recorded January 5, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Instruments And Electronics: Korg R3 Vocoder/Synthesizer Micro Moog Analog Synthesizer Voice Five Below Modified Electronic Sound Generator Ibanez DM 1000 Digital Delay Boss RC-20XL Loop Station Loop Duplicator Diane The Mannequin Hand Copyright 2018 by Taped Rugs Productions www.tapedrugs.com
  14. The name of this album translates to "God Bless America" in English. Each piece is an unrehearsed improvisation. The United States currently allows its citizens to create and share experimental audio artworks. One and all are encouraged to celebrate this album today, because who knows what might happen to it tomorrow? Track 1, English Translation: "the biggest crowd ever" Recorded January 2, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Track 2, English Translation: "very stable genius" Recorded January 17, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Track 3, English Translation: "no collusion" Recorded January 2, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Track 4, English Translation: "grab them by the pussy" Recorded January 5, 2018 Kansas City, Kansas, USA Instruments And Electronics: Korg R3 Vocoder/Synthesizer Micro Moog Analog Synthesizer Voice Five Below Modified Electronic Sound Generator Ibanez DM 1000 Digital Delay Boss RC-20XL Loop Station Loop Duplicator Diane The Mannequin Hand Copyright 2018 by Taped Rugs Productions www.tapedrugs.com View full album
  15. CIIIGoff

    The Forgotten Sanctuary by JIHEL

    The five stars are meant to call the attention of fans of 1970's synth music in the style of Schulze, Tangerine Dream, Kraftwerk, etc. Berthelot was playing in their league back in those days, and this album should bring plenty of smiles to your ears. An exquisitely polished production. (Berthelot's still actively experimenting in sound today too, with impressive results.)
  16. Jean-Luc BERTHELOT special radio broadcast this weekend, KOWS, 92.5 FM in Occidental/Sebastopol, California. 

    12:00 AM USA PACIFIC TIME,  Saturday March 3rd (Friday Midnight) here: KOWS Listen

    (p)Replay anytime for the next month or so here: The Deprogramming Center #60

    Dig it!

  17. CIIIGoff

    Dans les pliures des rêves synclinaux by BERTHELOT

    Thanks again, that's perfect. I again very much appreciate your responses. I'm looking forward to sharing your sounds with my audience.
  18. CIIIGoff

    Dans les pliures des rêves synclinaux by BERTHELOT

    Thanks Jean-Luc for the quick reply. I also often create sound sculptures in a similar manner, but most of the "library" for those pieces is made up of recordings that I originated myself with intruments (or non-instruments), voice, and original field recordings. I often create these recordings "as needed" to shape the results that I have envisioned for a final result. (I do sample a lot of verbiage from pre-recorded spoken word albums too -- my library of those items is extensive). How much of your library is made of original sounds that you initially produced yourself? What sort of sound generators do you use to produce these sounds? (instruments, non instruments, ect.) I appreciate any insights you can give here. I will be sharing your comments with my radio audience in California soon, thanks!
  19. CIIIGoff

    Dans les pliures des rêves synclinaux by BERTHELOT

    These folded dreams are quite unique bits of sonic sculpture. (I often dream melodies, many of which I have developed into songs.) What sort of instrumentation/compositional tools did you use to construct these, Jean Luc?
  20. CIIIGoff

    What You Say Tells What You Are

    Voices, Improv, Collage, Magic... All music in this collection was performed, recorded, engineered, edited, and produced by Charles Rice Goff III, except "Sensual Artless Beautiful," which was created in collaboration with Greg Segal, who added piano and synthesizer to a raw Goff recording, and who engineered the final result. Some Specifics: 1 "Voxipedic Ambulator" was created for the album: "One Minute Symphony/Apologia De Los Insectos" (https://endogamic.bandcamp.com/album/one-minute-symphony-apolog-a-de-los-insectos), released by Endogamic/Antonio Murga in September, 2017. 2 "Sweven" is a Goff III improvisation, created January 2, 2018. The word "Sweven" means: "a vision seen in sleep." 3 "Sensual Artless Beautiful" was created for the album: "Invisible Ground of Sympathy" by Greg Segal With Friends (http://www.gregsegal.com/invisiblegroundofsympathy.htm), released by Phantom Airship in August, 2017. 4 "Life's Unquiet Dream" was created in February, 2018, out of leftover building blocks from Goff's Taped Rugs album: "Tone Telegrams" (https://archive.org/details/ToneTelegrams), released in April, 2017. 5 "What Did You Do To My Dad?" and "I Forgot My PIN Code" were created for the compilation album: "Twenty-Seven Years Later" (https://generationsunlimited.bandcamp.com/album/twenty-seven-years-later), released by Generations Unlimited/Gen Ken Montgomery in October, 2017. 6 "Choir Ire For Facile Figs" is a Goff III improvisation, created January 6, 2018. "Choir Ire Facile Figs" is an anagram of "Charles Rice Goff III." The word "for" is a handy English preposition. 7 "Oligarchies Ice Riff" is a Goff III improvisation, created January 2, 2018. "Oligarchies Ice Riff" is an anagram of "Charles Rice Goff III." 8 "Catwalks In Sandusky Manor" is a segment of a much longer Goff III improvisation, recorded on August 15, 2017. It was extracted to serve as the soundtrack for a video Goff produced in December, 2017, which features Goff's cats: Carmelita and Climbit. A copy of the video is included in the online post, and a streamable online file is available here: https://archive.org/download/WhatYouSayTellsWhatYouAre/CatwalksInSanduskyManor.mp4 . The full-length improvisation from which this recording was extracted was released in January, 2018, on the Taped Rugs album "The Idea Of Hell In The Bible" (https://archive.org/details/TheIdeaOfHellInTheBible). 9 "Do It For Spiritual Fulfillment" was created for the compilation album: "Friends of Stilletid 2018" (https://stilletid.bandcamp.com/album/friends-of-stilletid-2018-compilation), released by Stilletid/Lasse Jensen in January, 2018. Goff also created the cover art for this album.
  21. Voices, Improv, Collage, Magic... All music in this collection was performed, recorded, engineered, edited, and produced by Charles Rice Goff III, except "Sensual Artless Beautiful," which was created in collaboration with Greg Segal, who added piano and synthesizer to a raw Goff recording, and who engineered the final result. Some Specifics: 1 "Voxipedic Ambulator" was created for the album: "One Minute Symphony/Apologia De Los Insectos" (https://endogamic.bandcamp.com/album/one-minute-symphony-apolog-a-de-los-insectos), released by Endogamic/Antonio Murga in September, 2017. 2 "Sweven" is a Goff III improvisation, created January 2, 2018. The word "Sweven" means: "a vision seen in sleep." 3 "Sensual Artless Beautiful" was created for the album: "Invisible Ground of Sympathy" by Greg Segal With Friends (http://www.gregsegal.com/invisiblegroundofsympathy.htm), released by Phantom Airship in August, 2017. 4 "Life's Unquiet Dream" was created in February, 2018, out of leftover building blocks from Goff's Taped Rugs album: "Tone Telegrams" (https://archive.org/details/ToneTelegrams), released in April, 2017. 5 "What Did You Do To My Dad?" and "I Forgot My PIN Code" were created for the compilation album: "Twenty-Seven Years Later" (https://generationsunlimited.bandcamp.com/album/twenty-seven-years-later), released by Generations Unlimited/Gen Ken Montgomery in October, 2017. 6 "Choir Ire For Facile Figs" is a Goff III improvisation, created January 6, 2018. "Choir Ire Facile Figs" is an anagram of "Charles Rice Goff III." The word "for" is a handy English preposition. 7 "Oligarchies Ice Riff" is a Goff III improvisation, created January 2, 2018. "Oligarchies Ice Riff" is an anagram of "Charles Rice Goff III." 8 "Catwalks In Sandusky Manor" is a segment of a much longer Goff III improvisation, recorded on August 15, 2017. It was extracted to serve as the soundtrack for a video Goff produced in December, 2017, which features Goff's cats: Carmelita and Climbit. A copy of the video is included in the online post, and a streamable online file is available here: https://archive.org/download/WhatYouSayTellsWhatYouAre/CatwalksInSanduskyManor.mp4 . The full-length improvisation from which this recording was extracted was released in January, 2018, on the Taped Rugs album "The Idea Of Hell In The Bible" (https://archive.org/details/TheIdeaOfHellInTheBible). 9 "Do It For Spiritual Fulfillment" was created for the compilation album: "Friends of Stilletid 2018" (https://stilletid.bandcamp.com/album/friends-of-stilletid-2018-compilation), released by Stilletid/Lasse Jensen in January, 2018. Goff also created the cover art for this album. View full album
  22. CIIIGoff

    Landscape HC-TT Human Controlled Tape Transport

    Thanks for sharing, Mr. H! This thing has some potential for live performance, looks very nifty, nice design. The video shown here would be much less exciting without all the external effects boxes, however, methinks. It also seems like tape players with pitch controls do pretty much the same stuff that this device does, and I've used such in live performance myself several times. Regular old 4 track tape recorders also possess the ablility to flip tapes over and play the recordings backwards, and, used with a properly fingered pause button, can produce the same sounds that this thing does as well. There is a hip-hoppy-ness to this device for sure though, which I'm sure attracts attention to modern performers and audiences. It also is nice and compact, which has many advantages for performing as well. Very interesting. A bit expensive for us starving audio artists though.
  23. I saw Mr. Penn Jillette do the live "narration" for the Mark Of The Mole show a couple of times back in 1982. No one knew who he was then. I saw him play bass for the group on their middle 1980's tour too (last show, Warfield, SF). Most of the official Mole Show Ralph Recordz stuff I've seen over the years is made up of edits and collages -- not the straight ahead show itself, no Penn Jillette, sadly. I, naturally, have a pretty good recording from one of the SF shows from those days. I saw the Residents lots of times back in the 20th Century, used to go to Ralph garage sales regularly, saw Homer do a live demo of the FREAK SHOW interactive DVD/CD at the Mill Valley Film Fest. Ah, those were the days...
  24. CIIIGoff

    OaklandXNoise - MasterClock: LIVE Open Electronic Music Jam!

    until

    Is the Master Clock going to be synchronized with the End Of Time One Second From Now?
  25. CIIIGoff

    Droned And Confused

    "Droned And Confused" is Volume Fifty-One of the Taped Rugs "Uncooked" series of productions. The recording marks the 10-Year Anniversary of the Uncooked series. All sounds on it were recorded by Charles Rice Goff III alone and alive in the Taped Rugs studio in Kansas City, Kansas, on January 17, 2018. It is an unrehearsed improvisation and is presented without the addition of effects nor overdubbed materials. Some short portions of the original recording were deleted. The audio tools employed to create this recording include: Korg R3 Vocoder/Synthesizer Micro Moog Analog Synthesizer Voice Five Below Modified Electronic Sound Generator Ibanez DM 1000 Digital Delay Boss RC-20XL Loop Station Loop Duplicator Diane The Mannequin Hand Copyright 2018 by Taped Rugs Productions www.tapedrugs.com
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