Jack Hertz

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About Jack Hertz

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    Bay Area, CA
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    Sound Design, FM Synthesis, Publishing, Improvised music, Music Concrete, Digital Synthesis, Visual Design, Video Production, Software Development, Unix, Outdoors, Spirituality, Reading, Publishing

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  1. Topic: Triadex The Muse

    The Triadex Muse is a sequencer-based synthesizer, produced in 1972, and designed by Edward Fredkin and Marvin Minsky at MIT. It is an algorithmic, deterministic event generator, utilizing early digital integrated circuits to generate an audio output that can sound very musical. It produces a sequence of notes based on the settings of about a dozen different parameters, including four small sliders that control Volume, Tempo, Pitch, and Fine Pitch. Only a few hundred were ever made. View full synthesizer
  2. Triadex The Muse

    The Triadex Inc. The Muse is a sequencer-based synthesizer, produced in 1972. It is an algorithmic, deterministic event generator, utilizing early digital integrated circuits to generate an audio output that can sound very musical. It produces a sequence of notes based on the settings of about a dozen different parameters, including four small sliders that control Volume, Tempo, Pitch, and Fine Pitch. Since the Muse was designed as a composition tool, not a synthesizer, there is no control over the timbre of the sound; rather, the front panel controls affect the melodies that are generated. The exact logic behind the composition engine is rather technical, and not exactly intuitive. The four small sliders in the lower-left control Volume, Tempo, Pitch, and Fine Pitch. The switches to either side are used to start and stop the sequence or to step through it note-by-note. Of the eight larger sliders on the right, four control the musical intervals used (labeled A, B, C, and D), and four control the theme (labeled W, X, Y, and Z). A rest can be substituted for the lowest note by flipping a toggle switch. The tempo clock can be slaved to that of another Muse, allowing for multi-part compositions. The Muse even had an even rarer accessory option called the "Light Show", which flashed colored lights in time to the music.
  3. What the Future Sounded Like

    The best look at origins of the EMS company you will find because it is told by the founders themselves. I had no idea it was just 3 people who developed so many sophisticated ideas in the late 60s. Like many innovative companies, the story of EMS was spectacular and tragic. Often overlooked, these guys were every bit as innovative as ARP, Moog and even Buchla.
  4. Timewind - Klaus Schulze

    Always a good listen, and impressive for the early gear. However, I see this as a transitional piece to his more ambitious releases such as "Mirage" and especially "X".
  5. Post-war Britain rebuilt itself on a wave of scientific and industrial breakthroughs that culminated in the cultural revolution of the 1960’s. It was a period of sweeping change and experimentation where art and culture participated in and reflected the wider social changes. In this atmosphere, a radical new group of electronic musicians utilized technology and experimentation to compose a futuristic soundtrack for the New Britain. In the early 60’s pioneering electronic musicians Tristram Cary and Peter Zinovieff established EMS (Electronic Music Studios) with wunderkind music engineer David Cockerell. EMS’s legacy is the VCS3, Britain’s first synthesizer and rival of the American Moog. The VCS3 was a uniquely British invention used by some of the most popular artists of this period including The Who, David Bowie, Brian Eno and Pink Floyd, whose iconic album Dark Side of The Moon utilized the unique sounds of the VCS3 to startling effect. The album is still one of the top selling records of all time. The individual backgrounds of the EMS characters show them as pioneering vanguards in their own right. As early as 1945 Cary hand-built the world’s largest private electronic music studio from war-surplus junk and went to lead London’s electronic avant-garde. He also moonlighted as a composer for pop cult films like The LadyKillers and the seminal television series Dr Who. Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat and fringe dwelling avant-garde composer, borrowed money from his rich British wife to buy two military grade computers specifically for his personal experiments in electronic music. With David Cockerell’s ability to make anything that Cary and Zinovieff dreamed up, EMS’s musical inventiveness opened up a world of new musical possibilities. Prime Minister Harold Wilson famously declared in 1964, ‘Britain will forge itself with the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution. As leaders of a group of machine-based musicians, EMS was the ideal sonic-architects for a society where technology was God. They created incredible sounds for films about nuclear power reactors, adverts for early Olivetti computers and for the British Pavilion at the ‘67 World Expo. Played back today this early electronic music still arouses wonder at its creation and power. The cross-pollination of swinging London’s psychedelic rock scene elite with the cardigan wearing ‘straights’ of EMS, changed the course of British rock and roll. Today in the avant-garde world of British electronica, the analog reverberations of EMS equipment and inspiration have come full circle and are being harnessed by bands like Add-N-To-X, Radiohead, and Aphex Twin. In an electronically dominated music world where one synthesizer can be preprogrammed to make any sound, these analog revivalists see the pioneering legacy of EMS as electro-genesis. What The Future Sounded Like mixes experimental visual and sonic techniques with animation and never-seen-since archival footage. A sonic and visual collage, this documentary colors in a lost chapter in music history, uncovering a group of alchemical composers and music engineers who harnessed technology and new ideas to reimagine the boundaries of music and sound. DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT - MATTHEW BATE What The Future Sounded Like is in many ways theculmination of my on-going love of electronic music.This affair began subconsciously in early childhood inthe U.K, listening on the radio to things like War Of TheWorlds, Kraftwerk’s Tour De France and watching Dr Whoon television (the sound was always much scarier thanthe papier mache monsters!). Later on I spent years insidedingy clubs listening to Detroit Techno, Chicago House andBritish Electronica. When I met Claire Harris and she told me that she knew Tristram Cary and that he lived in Adelaide we thought that he would make a great documentary subject. This was a chance to delve into the back history of a subject I thought I knew about. Whenever people talk of the beginnings of this music it usually starts with bands like Kraftwerk. But people like Tristram Cary were pioneering electronic music techniques from the late 40’s using machines hand built from war-junk. Tristram’s scores are monolithic soundscapes, grating and beautiful and unlike anything I’d ever heard before. He also scored for Dr Who and films like the Ladykillers and Hammer Horror films. Thus our project began as a bio-pic about Tristram before morphing into a story about the Electronic Music Studios (EMS). The story of EMS is truly amazing. In the mid 60’s Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat, bought a computer which, at the time only the military and large factories had access to. But Peter didn’t want to launch rockets or control food processing; he wanted to change the boundaries of how to make music. From the late 50’s Peter and Tristram led a vanguard of avant-garde electronic music makers who sought to re-define what music could be. One of the most intriguing ideas for the film is that these artists were making music and sounds which had never been heard before, using equipment which was either hand built or appropriated from cutting edge scientific hardware. What a beautiful idea that such an alchemical process should be used to make music. Together with Tristram and genius-engineer David Cockerell, Peter Zinovieff established EMS one of the first computer music facilities in the world. They pioneered techniques now taken for granted such as digital sequencing, sampling and analysing. Prime Minister Harold Wilson declared in 1964 that England would be ‘forged in the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution’. This idea forms another key to our story; that EMS was breaking new artistic ground with the science and technology of music, and in a way provided a futuristic sound-track for the New Britain. When they needed more money to fund their ideas EMS invented England’s first synthesizer, the VCS3, which coincidentally changed the sound palette available to mainstream rock bands in the late 60’s. Suddenly iconic bands like Pink Floyd and Roxy Music were turned on to electronic music through a crosspollination with the avant-garde EMS. Today bands like Radiohead and Aphex Twin are still using this EMS gear. This was another seductive idea in telling this story, that these fringe-dwelling avant-garde musicians had influenced the sounds of iconic albums like Dark Side of The Moon and the glam rock of Roxy Music! View full movie
  6. What the Future Sounded Like

    Post-war Britain rebuilt itself on a wave of scientific and industrial breakthroughs that culminated in the cultural revolution of the 1960’s. It was a period of sweeping change and experimentation where art and culture participated in and reflected the wider social changes. In this atmosphere, a radical new group of electronic musicians utilized technology and experimentation to compose a futuristic soundtrack for the New Britain. In the early 60’s pioneering electronic musicians Tristram Cary and Peter Zinovieff established EMS (Electronic Music Studios) with wunderkind music engineer David Cockerell. EMS’s legacy is the VCS3, Britain’s first synthesizer and rival of the American Moog. The VCS3 was a uniquely British invention used by some of the most popular artists of this period including The Who, David Bowie, Brian Eno and Pink Floyd, whose iconic album Dark Side of The Moon utilized the unique sounds of the VCS3 to startling effect. The album is still one of the top selling records of all time. The individual backgrounds of the EMS characters show them as pioneering vanguards in their own right. As early as 1945 Cary hand-built the world’s largest private electronic music studio from war-surplus junk and went to lead London’s electronic avant-garde. He also moonlighted as a composer for pop cult films like The LadyKillers and the seminal television series Dr Who. Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat and fringe dwelling avant-garde composer, borrowed money from his rich British wife to buy two military grade computers specifically for his personal experiments in electronic music. With David Cockerell’s ability to make anything that Cary and Zinovieff dreamed up, EMS’s musical inventiveness opened up a world of new musical possibilities. Prime Minister Harold Wilson famously declared in 1964, ‘Britain will forge itself with the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution. As leaders of a group of machine-based musicians, EMS was the ideal sonic-architects for a society where technology was God. They created incredible sounds for films about nuclear power reactors, adverts for early Olivetti computers and for the British Pavilion at the ‘67 World Expo. Played back today this early electronic music still arouses wonder at its creation and power. The cross-pollination of swinging London’s psychedelic rock scene elite with the cardigan wearing ‘straights’ of EMS, changed the course of British rock and roll. Today in the avant-garde world of British electronica, the analog reverberations of EMS equipment and inspiration have come full circle and are being harnessed by bands like Add-N-To-X, Radiohead, and Aphex Twin. In an electronically dominated music world where one synthesizer can be preprogrammed to make any sound, these analog revivalists see the pioneering legacy of EMS as electro-genesis. What The Future Sounded Like mixes experimental visual and sonic techniques with animation and never-seen-since archival footage. A sonic and visual collage, this documentary colors in a lost chapter in music history, uncovering a group of alchemical composers and music engineers who harnessed technology and new ideas to reimagine the boundaries of music and sound. DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT - MATTHEW BATE What The Future Sounded Like is in many ways theculmination of my on-going love of electronic music.This affair began subconsciously in early childhood inthe U.K, listening on the radio to things like War Of TheWorlds, Kraftwerk’s Tour De France and watching Dr Whoon television (the sound was always much scarier thanthe papier mache monsters!). Later on I spent years insidedingy clubs listening to Detroit Techno, Chicago House andBritish Electronica. When I met Claire Harris and she told me that she knew Tristram Cary and that he lived in Adelaide we thought that he would make a great documentary subject. This was a chance to delve into the back history of a subject I thought I knew about. Whenever people talk of the beginnings of this music it usually starts with bands like Kraftwerk. But people like Tristram Cary were pioneering electronic music techniques from the late 40’s using machines hand built from war-junk. Tristram’s scores are monolithic soundscapes, grating and beautiful and unlike anything I’d ever heard before. He also scored for Dr Who and films like the Ladykillers and Hammer Horror films. Thus our project began as a bio-pic about Tristram before morphing into a story about the Electronic Music Studios (EMS). The story of EMS is truly amazing. In the mid 60’s Peter Zinovieff, an exiled Russian aristocrat, bought a computer which, at the time only the military and large factories had access to. But Peter didn’t want to launch rockets or control food processing; he wanted to change the boundaries of how to make music. From the late 50’s Peter and Tristram led a vanguard of avant-garde electronic music makers who sought to re-define what music could be. One of the most intriguing ideas for the film is that these artists were making music and sounds which had never been heard before, using equipment which was either hand built or appropriated from cutting edge scientific hardware. What a beautiful idea that such an alchemical process should be used to make music. Together with Tristram and genius-engineer David Cockerell, Peter Zinovieff established EMS one of the first computer music facilities in the world. They pioneered techniques now taken for granted such as digital sequencing, sampling and analysing. Prime Minister Harold Wilson declared in 1964 that England would be ‘forged in the white-hot heat of a scientific revolution’. This idea forms another key to our story; that EMS was breaking new artistic ground with the science and technology of music, and in a way provided a futuristic sound-track for the New Britain. When they needed more money to fund their ideas EMS invented England’s first synthesizer, the VCS3, which coincidentally changed the sound palette available to mainstream rock bands in the late 60’s. Suddenly iconic bands like Pink Floyd and Roxy Music were turned on to electronic music through a crosspollination with the avant-garde EMS. Today bands like Radiohead and Aphex Twin are still using this EMS gear. This was another seductive idea in telling this story, that these fringe-dwelling avant-garde musicians had influenced the sounds of iconic albums like Dark Side of The Moon and the glam rock of Roxy Music!
  7. The Alchemists of Sound

    A documentary about the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, responsible for creating some of the most memorable television and radio music in British popular culture, including "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" and Doctor Who (1963). The BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop was set up in 1958, born out of a desire to create ‘new kinds of sounds’. The Alchemists of Sound looks at this creative group from its inception, through its golden age when it was supplying music and effects for cult classics like Doctor Who, Blake’s Seven and Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, and charts its fading away in 1995 when, due to budget cuts, it was no longer able to survive. There are interviews with composers from the Workshop, as well as musicians and writers who have been inspired by the output. Great archive footage of the Workshop and its machinery is accompanied by excerpts of the, now cult, TV programs that featured these sounds. View full movie
  8. The Alchemists of Sound

    A documentary about the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, responsible for creating some of the most memorable television and radio music in British popular culture, including "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" and Doctor Who (1963). The BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop was set up in 1958, born out of a desire to create ‘new kinds of sounds’. The Alchemists of Sound looks at this creative group from its inception, through its golden age when it was supplying music and effects for cult classics like Doctor Who, Blake’s Seven and Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, and charts its fading away in 1995 when, due to budget cuts, it was no longer able to survive. There are interviews with composers from the Workshop, as well as musicians and writers who have been inspired by the output. Great archive footage of the Workshop and its machinery is accompanied by excerpts of the, now cult, TV programs that featured these sounds.
  9. The New Sound of Music

    The New Sound of Music is a fascinating BBC historical documentary from the year 1979. It charts the development of recorded music from the first barrel organs, pianolas, the phonograph, the magnetic tape recorder and onto the concepts of musique concrete and electronic music development with voltage-controlled oscillators making up the analog synthesizers of the day. EMS Synthesizers and equipment are a heavily featured technology resource in this film, with the show's host, Michael Rodd, demonstrating the EMS VCS3 synthesizer and it's waveform output. Other EMS products include the incredible Synthi 100 modular console system, the EMS AKS, the Poly Synthi and the EMS Vocoder. Most of the location shots are filmed within the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop studios as they were in 1979. Malcolm Clarke demonstrates the Synthi 100, also known as the "Delaware", Michael Rodd demonstrates musique concrete by tape splicing and manipulation and Paddy Kingsland demonstrates tape recorder delay techniques (also known as "Frippertronics"). The Yamaha CS-80 analog synthesizer is demonstrated by both Peter Howell and Roger Limb. The EMS Vocoder is also expertly put to use by Peter Howell on his classic "Greenwich Chorus" for the television series "The Body in Question". Dick Mills works on sound effects for Doctor Who using a VCS3 unit, and Elizabeth Parker uses bubble sounds to create music for an academic film on particle physics. Peter Zinovieff is featured using his computer music studio and DEC PDP8 computer to produce electronic variations on classic vintage scores. David Vorhaus is featured using his invention, the MANIAC (Multiphasic ANalog Inter-Active Chromataphonic (sequencer)), and playing his other invention, the Kaleidophon -- which uses lengths of magnetic tape as velocity-sensitive ribbon controllers. The New Sound of Music is a fascinating insight into the birth of the world of recorded and electronic music and features some very classic British analog synthesizers creating the electronic sounds in this film. The prime location for these demonstrations is the BBC Radiophonic Workshop where much creativity and invention took place during the period the workshop was in operation in the latter part of the twentieth century. Electronic music today is used everywhere, and many musicians gain inspiration from the past, as well as delving into the realms of sonic structures and theories made possible by the widespread use of computers to manipulate sounds for the creation of all kinds of musical forms. View full movie
  10. The New Sound of Music

    The New Sound of Music is a fascinating BBC historical documentary from the year 1979. It charts the development of recorded music from the first barrel organs, pianolas, the phonograph, the magnetic tape recorder and onto the concepts of musique concrete and electronic music development with voltage-controlled oscillators making up the analog synthesizers of the day. EMS Synthesizers and equipment are a heavily featured technology resource in this film, with the show's host, Michael Rodd, demonstrating the EMS VCS3 synthesizer and it's waveform output. Other EMS products include the incredible Synthi 100 modular console system, the EMS AKS, the Poly Synthi and the EMS Vocoder. Most of the location shots are filmed within the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop studios as they were in 1979. Malcolm Clarke demonstrates the Synthi 100, also known as the "Delaware", Michael Rodd demonstrates musique concrete by tape splicing and manipulation and Paddy Kingsland demonstrates tape recorder delay techniques (also known as "Frippertronics"). The Yamaha CS-80 analog synthesizer is demonstrated by both Peter Howell and Roger Limb. The EMS Vocoder is also expertly put to use by Peter Howell on his classic "Greenwich Chorus" for the television series "The Body in Question". Dick Mills works on sound effects for Doctor Who using a VCS3 unit, and Elizabeth Parker uses bubble sounds to create music for an academic film on particle physics. Peter Zinovieff is featured using his computer music studio and DEC PDP8 computer to produce electronic variations on classic vintage scores. David Vorhaus is featured using his invention, the MANIAC (Multiphasic ANalog Inter-Active Chromataphonic (sequencer)), and playing his other invention, the Kaleidophon -- which uses lengths of magnetic tape as velocity-sensitive ribbon controllers. The New Sound of Music is a fascinating insight into the birth of the world of recorded and electronic music and features some very classic British analog synthesizers creating the electronic sounds in this film. The prime location for these demonstrations is the BBC Radiophonic Workshop where much creativity and invention took place during the period the workshop was in operation in the latter part of the twentieth century. Electronic music today is used everywhere, and many musicians gain inspiration from the past, as well as delving into the realms of sonic structures and theories made possible by the widespread use of computers to manipulate sounds for the creation of all kinds of musical forms.
  11. Electronic music without any instruments like synthesizers, samplers, guitars... just the virtual oscillators of a program. This was the approach for "A Passage Through Time" from the year 2012 created by experimental musician Christian Fiesel. Beyond this album was a loss, during the creation of the album, the mother of the artist declined mentally and died after release. So "A Passage Through Time" is an emotional journey through the tides of life by the means of electronic soundscapes. The music meanders between drone, dark ambient and ambient.
  12. Glitch is a film about circuit bending. Made by Myself and a small crew, featuring circuit bending talent from up and down the country. When I started this project I wanted to incorporate video bending into the film. I had no way to do this and found no one who could help me to do it before the deadline. For some reason one of my capture files corrupted... Not only did it corrupt but it mixed itself with footage from a previous shoot, so I incorporated it into the film. View full movie
  13. Glitch is a film about circuit bending. Made by Myself and a small crew, featuring circuit bending talent from up and down the country. When I started this project I wanted to incorporate video bending into the film. I had no way to do this and found no one who could help me to do it before the deadline. For some reason one of my capture files corrupted... Not only did it corrupt but it mixed itself with footage from a previous shoot, so I incorporated it into the film.
  14. Synth Britannia

    Documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesizer from the experimental fringes to the center of the pop stage. In the late 1970s, small pockets of electronic artists including the Human League, Daniel Miller and Cabaret Volatire were inspired by Kraftwerk and JG Ballard, and they dreamt of the sound of the future against the backdrop of bleak, high-rise Britain. The crossover moment came in 1979 when Gary Numan's appearance on Top of the Pops with Tubeway Army's Are 'Friends' Electric? heralded the arrival of synthpop. Four lads from Basildon known as Depeche Mode would come to own the new sound, whilst post-punk bands like Ultravox, Soft Cell, OMD and Yazoo took the synth out of the pages of NME and onto the front page of Smash Hits. By 1983, acts like Pet Shop Boys and New Order were showing that the future of electronic music would lie in dance music. Contributors include Philip Oakey, Vince Clarke, Martin Gore, Bernard Sumner, Gary Numan and Neil Tennant. View full movie
  15. Synth Britannia

    Documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesizer from the experimental fringes to the center of the pop stage. In the late 1970s, small pockets of electronic artists including the Human League, Daniel Miller and Cabaret Volatire were inspired by Kraftwerk and JG Ballard, and they dreamt of the sound of the future against the backdrop of bleak, high-rise Britain. The crossover moment came in 1979 when Gary Numan's appearance on Top of the Pops with Tubeway Army's Are 'Friends' Electric? heralded the arrival of synthpop. Four lads from Basildon known as Depeche Mode would come to own the new sound, whilst post-punk bands like Ultravox, Soft Cell, OMD and Yazoo took the synth out of the pages of NME and onto the front page of Smash Hits. By 1983, acts like Pet Shop Boys and New Order were showing that the future of electronic music would lie in dance music. Contributors include Philip Oakey, Vince Clarke, Martin Gore, Bernard Sumner, Gary Numan and Neil Tennant.