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Jack Hertz

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Status Replies posted by Jack Hertz

  1. Hi, 

     

    I've been using Voltage Modular software for the last month or more and have become obsessed with it. It's not free and a very steep learning curve but the possibilities are only in computer power ultimately if you collect enough module bundles and things, which I have been doing before the prices go up. The expense has forced me to focus on using it when ill health would have otherwise caused me to not bother had it been free as I have to justify the expense to myself, so it works for me so far. I haven't produced many results with it yet, mostly just sections of live recording (the way Tangerine Dream recorded Phaedra using the Moog Modular - leave the tapes recording whilst experimenting). 
    I have put up one thing on youtube ... (continued under video link)

    ... and another on Bandcamp,    ... (continued under bandcamp link) 
     

    https://iancraig1.bandcamp.com/track/making-smile-memories-beautiful-modular-1a2-l

    both recorded live and slightly edited.

    Also, I was looking up Chris Franke's 1982 setup and found the following article which seems to cover the subject from a historical hardware standpoint, but otherwise in exactly the same kind of way I see the subject myself. It makes interesting reading. 

    http://www.muzines.co.uk/articles/chris-franke-on-sequencers/5932 

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Wow, nice track and video to go with. 👌

      Glad to hear you're dipping into the modular realm. The digital side has plenty to offer, and some other benefits like being able to save your patches. Anyways, its all the same in the in end.

      Thanks for the article link as well. Looks like a great read. Always been a fan of Franke's work. I'll just shut up, read and listen now. Thanks! 👩‍🚀

       

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  2.  

    BIG DATA:

    That’s where it’s all at, I am told-- ‘Big Data’. I have been learning to code to gain access to it, and the world increasingly revolves around it.

    The trouble is-- Is it accurate? Can we trust it?

    The fact is, nearly every database has some degree of error. Some have quite a bit of built-in-error. Those that do not admit to this are not being honest with their users.

    There is a popular reference database, for example, that was designed for startup businesspeople and advertising. It shows the economic conditions and spending patterns of over 290 million Americans.

    Unfortunately, nearly every entry in the database is flawed. Some have out-of-date information-- dating back to the last Census, over 8 years ago. Some do not explain where their data comes from.

    This database does not explain the potential built-in errors, nor does it reveal in detail its sources. I believe that all public databases should include detail about and disclaimers concerning possible inaccuracies.

    If a person made a major economic decision based on this database, they would risk taking losses. This because the database is flawed, and because nowhere on the databases’ website does it list or explain these flaws.

    When data has errors, problems are bound to occur. As long as we refer to data as a reality grounded in “probability”, we are ok. As soon as we use databases as justifications for action, we have to be careful.

    What if, for example, a study that suggested that many cancer cases occurred in a certain city turned out to use data from a Census that was from a decade ago? What if this affected the ill-timed or ill-placed construction of anti-cancer centers, or training and/or deployment of doctors?

    I have used perhaps a half-dozen databases in my SQL training this year. All have been helpful, and all have been full of errors. And that’s ok, as long as I am using them as probabilities, as aids towards understanding. If I am treating the data, however, as though it is objectively true, and making decisions based on it-- that’s when problems begin.

    Imagine relocating a business only to find that your new location is not lucrative for your industry. Imagine being denied a spot in a class, or for a loan, due to data that is inaccurate, or of date, or unfair to use. Imagine taking a trip to a spot and finding it to be nothing like what was promised.

    In a culture, in a society, that holds big data to be truth, and information to be money-- remember, please, to be careful and selective about how data is used. True objectivity is hard to achieve, whether you are a consumer, a small business owner, or a large corporation.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Beyond digital is genetics and molecular domains, such as string theory, etc. I highly recommend Rudy Rucker's book, "Mind Tools". Its old, but a nice stroll through what the world looks like using numbers and data. 

      https://www.amazon.com/Mind-Tools-Levels-Mathematical-Reality/dp/0395468108

    2. (See 11 other replies to this status update)

  3.  

    BIG DATA:

    That’s where it’s all at, I am told-- ‘Big Data’. I have been learning to code to gain access to it, and the world increasingly revolves around it.

    The trouble is-- Is it accurate? Can we trust it?

    The fact is, nearly every database has some degree of error. Some have quite a bit of built-in-error. Those that do not admit to this are not being honest with their users.

    There is a popular reference database, for example, that was designed for startup businesspeople and advertising. It shows the economic conditions and spending patterns of over 290 million Americans.

    Unfortunately, nearly every entry in the database is flawed. Some have out-of-date information-- dating back to the last Census, over 8 years ago. Some do not explain where their data comes from.

    This database does not explain the potential built-in errors, nor does it reveal in detail its sources. I believe that all public databases should include detail about and disclaimers concerning possible inaccuracies.

    If a person made a major economic decision based on this database, they would risk taking losses. This because the database is flawed, and because nowhere on the databases’ website does it list or explain these flaws.

    When data has errors, problems are bound to occur. As long as we refer to data as a reality grounded in “probability”, we are ok. As soon as we use databases as justifications for action, we have to be careful.

    What if, for example, a study that suggested that many cancer cases occurred in a certain city turned out to use data from a Census that was from a decade ago? What if this affected the ill-timed or ill-placed construction of anti-cancer centers, or training and/or deployment of doctors?

    I have used perhaps a half-dozen databases in my SQL training this year. All have been helpful, and all have been full of errors. And that’s ok, as long as I am using them as probabilities, as aids towards understanding. If I am treating the data, however, as though it is objectively true, and making decisions based on it-- that’s when problems begin.

    Imagine relocating a business only to find that your new location is not lucrative for your industry. Imagine being denied a spot in a class, or for a loan, due to data that is inaccurate, or of date, or unfair to use. Imagine taking a trip to a spot and finding it to be nothing like what was promised.

    In a culture, in a society, that holds big data to be truth, and information to be money-- remember, please, to be careful and selective about how data is used. True objectivity is hard to achieve, whether you are a consumer, a small business owner, or a large corporation.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      I am not sure anyone can really understand the metaphysical aspects. Data, big and small, is for everyday life. From clocks to the weather, there is data in just about everything. Even all the colors know to mankind, have been turned into the data elements of RGB.

    2. (See 11 other replies to this status update)

  4.  

    BIG DATA:

    That’s where it’s all at, I am told-- ‘Big Data’. I have been learning to code to gain access to it, and the world increasingly revolves around it.

    The trouble is-- Is it accurate? Can we trust it?

    The fact is, nearly every database has some degree of error. Some have quite a bit of built-in-error. Those that do not admit to this are not being honest with their users.

    There is a popular reference database, for example, that was designed for startup businesspeople and advertising. It shows the economic conditions and spending patterns of over 290 million Americans.

    Unfortunately, nearly every entry in the database is flawed. Some have out-of-date information-- dating back to the last Census, over 8 years ago. Some do not explain where their data comes from.

    This database does not explain the potential built-in errors, nor does it reveal in detail its sources. I believe that all public databases should include detail about and disclaimers concerning possible inaccuracies.

    If a person made a major economic decision based on this database, they would risk taking losses. This because the database is flawed, and because nowhere on the databases’ website does it list or explain these flaws.

    When data has errors, problems are bound to occur. As long as we refer to data as a reality grounded in “probability”, we are ok. As soon as we use databases as justifications for action, we have to be careful.

    What if, for example, a study that suggested that many cancer cases occurred in a certain city turned out to use data from a Census that was from a decade ago? What if this affected the ill-timed or ill-placed construction of anti-cancer centers, or training and/or deployment of doctors?

    I have used perhaps a half-dozen databases in my SQL training this year. All have been helpful, and all have been full of errors. And that’s ok, as long as I am using them as probabilities, as aids towards understanding. If I am treating the data, however, as though it is objectively true, and making decisions based on it-- that’s when problems begin.

    Imagine relocating a business only to find that your new location is not lucrative for your industry. Imagine being denied a spot in a class, or for a loan, due to data that is inaccurate, or of date, or unfair to use. Imagine taking a trip to a spot and finding it to be nothing like what was promised.

    In a culture, in a society, that holds big data to be truth, and information to be money-- remember, please, to be careful and selective about how data is used. True objectivity is hard to achieve, whether you are a consumer, a small business owner, or a large corporation.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      In a sense, we are all classified into profiles that advertisers target by age, sex, nationality, etc. So I don't even see is as personal as having a doppleganger. We're all being optimized for consumption purposes. You can find this in nature as well, species do optimize for their surroundings. Both to attract and defend. I think humans are also learning to defend against these virtual threats. The slide of Facebook is clearly due to a culture rift that was learned.

    2. (See 11 other replies to this status update)

  5.  

    BIG DATA:

    That’s where it’s all at, I am told-- ‘Big Data’. I have been learning to code to gain access to it, and the world increasingly revolves around it.

    The trouble is-- Is it accurate? Can we trust it?

    The fact is, nearly every database has some degree of error. Some have quite a bit of built-in-error. Those that do not admit to this are not being honest with their users.

    There is a popular reference database, for example, that was designed for startup businesspeople and advertising. It shows the economic conditions and spending patterns of over 290 million Americans.

    Unfortunately, nearly every entry in the database is flawed. Some have out-of-date information-- dating back to the last Census, over 8 years ago. Some do not explain where their data comes from.

    This database does not explain the potential built-in errors, nor does it reveal in detail its sources. I believe that all public databases should include detail about and disclaimers concerning possible inaccuracies.

    If a person made a major economic decision based on this database, they would risk taking losses. This because the database is flawed, and because nowhere on the databases’ website does it list or explain these flaws.

    When data has errors, problems are bound to occur. As long as we refer to data as a reality grounded in “probability”, we are ok. As soon as we use databases as justifications for action, we have to be careful.

    What if, for example, a study that suggested that many cancer cases occurred in a certain city turned out to use data from a Census that was from a decade ago? What if this affected the ill-timed or ill-placed construction of anti-cancer centers, or training and/or deployment of doctors?

    I have used perhaps a half-dozen databases in my SQL training this year. All have been helpful, and all have been full of errors. And that’s ok, as long as I am using them as probabilities, as aids towards understanding. If I am treating the data, however, as though it is objectively true, and making decisions based on it-- that’s when problems begin.

    Imagine relocating a business only to find that your new location is not lucrative for your industry. Imagine being denied a spot in a class, or for a loan, due to data that is inaccurate, or of date, or unfair to use. Imagine taking a trip to a spot and finding it to be nothing like what was promised.

    In a culture, in a society, that holds big data to be truth, and information to be money-- remember, please, to be careful and selective about how data is used. True objectivity is hard to achieve, whether you are a consumer, a small business owner, or a large corporation.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      The "Big Data" years are already behind us. Its evolved into the fields of Business Intelligence (BI) and Machine Learning. Basically human pattern recognition on a real time basis. Those ADs following you around is part of that.

      I think you're always going to find a kind of projected future for all new products, or no one would buy them. So in that sense, we have always worshiped data. From which sticks work best for making fire to how to trick you and I into buying another widget.

    2. (See 11 other replies to this status update)

  6.  

    BIG DATA:

    That’s where it’s all at, I am told-- ‘Big Data’. I have been learning to code to gain access to it, and the world increasingly revolves around it.

    The trouble is-- Is it accurate? Can we trust it?

    The fact is, nearly every database has some degree of error. Some have quite a bit of built-in-error. Those that do not admit to this are not being honest with their users.

    There is a popular reference database, for example, that was designed for startup businesspeople and advertising. It shows the economic conditions and spending patterns of over 290 million Americans.

    Unfortunately, nearly every entry in the database is flawed. Some have out-of-date information-- dating back to the last Census, over 8 years ago. Some do not explain where their data comes from.

    This database does not explain the potential built-in errors, nor does it reveal in detail its sources. I believe that all public databases should include detail about and disclaimers concerning possible inaccuracies.

    If a person made a major economic decision based on this database, they would risk taking losses. This because the database is flawed, and because nowhere on the databases’ website does it list or explain these flaws.

    When data has errors, problems are bound to occur. As long as we refer to data as a reality grounded in “probability”, we are ok. As soon as we use databases as justifications for action, we have to be careful.

    What if, for example, a study that suggested that many cancer cases occurred in a certain city turned out to use data from a Census that was from a decade ago? What if this affected the ill-timed or ill-placed construction of anti-cancer centers, or training and/or deployment of doctors?

    I have used perhaps a half-dozen databases in my SQL training this year. All have been helpful, and all have been full of errors. And that’s ok, as long as I am using them as probabilities, as aids towards understanding. If I am treating the data, however, as though it is objectively true, and making decisions based on it-- that’s when problems begin.

    Imagine relocating a business only to find that your new location is not lucrative for your industry. Imagine being denied a spot in a class, or for a loan, due to data that is inaccurate, or of date, or unfair to use. Imagine taking a trip to a spot and finding it to be nothing like what was promised.

    In a culture, in a society, that holds big data to be truth, and information to be money-- remember, please, to be careful and selective about how data is used. True objectivity is hard to achieve, whether you are a consumer, a small business owner, or a large corporation.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Technology evolves faster than companies can keep up. Today's solution is tomorrow's bottleneck. 

    2. (See 11 other replies to this status update)

  7.  

    BIG DATA:

    That’s where it’s all at, I am told-- ‘Big Data’. I have been learning to code to gain access to it, and the world increasingly revolves around it.

    The trouble is-- Is it accurate? Can we trust it?

    The fact is, nearly every database has some degree of error. Some have quite a bit of built-in-error. Those that do not admit to this are not being honest with their users.

    There is a popular reference database, for example, that was designed for startup businesspeople and advertising. It shows the economic conditions and spending patterns of over 290 million Americans.

    Unfortunately, nearly every entry in the database is flawed. Some have out-of-date information-- dating back to the last Census, over 8 years ago. Some do not explain where their data comes from.

    This database does not explain the potential built-in errors, nor does it reveal in detail its sources. I believe that all public databases should include detail about and disclaimers concerning possible inaccuracies.

    If a person made a major economic decision based on this database, they would risk taking losses. This because the database is flawed, and because nowhere on the databases’ website does it list or explain these flaws.

    When data has errors, problems are bound to occur. As long as we refer to data as a reality grounded in “probability”, we are ok. As soon as we use databases as justifications for action, we have to be careful.

    What if, for example, a study that suggested that many cancer cases occurred in a certain city turned out to use data from a Census that was from a decade ago? What if this affected the ill-timed or ill-placed construction of anti-cancer centers, or training and/or deployment of doctors?

    I have used perhaps a half-dozen databases in my SQL training this year. All have been helpful, and all have been full of errors. And that’s ok, as long as I am using them as probabilities, as aids towards understanding. If I am treating the data, however, as though it is objectively true, and making decisions based on it-- that’s when problems begin.

    Imagine relocating a business only to find that your new location is not lucrative for your industry. Imagine being denied a spot in a class, or for a loan, due to data that is inaccurate, or of date, or unfair to use. Imagine taking a trip to a spot and finding it to be nothing like what was promised.

    In a culture, in a society, that holds big data to be truth, and information to be money-- remember, please, to be careful and selective about how data is used. True objectivity is hard to achieve, whether you are a consumer, a small business owner, or a large corporation.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Quote

      The trouble is-- Is it accurate? Can we trust it?

      You only need to look at the whole computing industry and how dysfunctional it has always been. THAT is why there is an industry. Because things are never accurate or reliable enough. 

    2. (See 11 other replies to this status update)

  8. Google Advanced Search: When you run a search on Google, it gives you this option, but I am sharing a direct link: https://www.google.com/advanced_search. Note that you can choose the type of domain to select (i.e. .com, .gov, .edu, and so forth). You can be very specific about certain terms appearing in the page. You can decide what license the page is-- so you could search for creative commons or public domain content. Try it out-- and share this information. Search in a smart way!

    Additionally, in the "Tools" section for normal searches, you can search for material that is from a recent period-- ie anything posted, to things posted within a certain number of hours.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Very handy! They offer extensions for the Image search too. You can search by size, resolution and even license.

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  9. Moby's selling his drum machine collection. 😲

    https://reverb.com/shop/official-moby

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Hahah, I have some celebrity gears too. I thought the prices were pretty fair, considering. And I too noted many of them were dysfunctional. Believe it or not, you can still find people to fix those relics. For a price, what else.

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  10. Even the biggest FB Group spammers can't compete against:

    FAKE NEWS!

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2018/10/11/facebook-purged-over-accounts-pages-pushing-political-messages-profit

    Who really abuses the system are people whose beliefs are hard to discern and have no conscience for methods.

     

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      What the Post also doesn't want to say, is there is a solution. To make it illegal to violate people's privacy, as it used to be. 

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

  11. I want to be quite clear about something. Trying to react to and provide alternatives to a failing paradigm is not in essence revolutionary, or seditious in any way. It is trying to make things work when a system begins to fail. There is a big difference, and I am sure people can see that. If big oil and coal are failing us, they need to be replaced. That is not a revolutionary statement, rather one made by necessity. If Cold War ideology is no longer functional, and causes more problems than it helps, it has, by need, to go. If you think about what parts of your life no longer work as they should, it is then ok, I feel, to take action to make changes until you are all right again.

  12. I want to be quite clear about something. Trying to react to and provide alternatives to a failing paradigm is not in essence revolutionary, or seditious in any way. It is trying to make things work when a system begins to fail. There is a big difference, and I am sure people can see that. If big oil and coal are failing us, they need to be replaced. That is not a revolutionary statement, rather one made by necessity. If Cold War ideology is no longer functional, and causes more problems than it helps, it has, by need, to go. If you think about what parts of your life no longer work as they should, it is then ok, I feel, to take action to make changes until you are all right again.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      IMO, the chasm is a form of resistance. People won't adopt something till it does something better, easily.

    2. (See 4 other replies to this status update)

  13. I want to be quite clear about something. Trying to react to and provide alternatives to a failing paradigm is not in essence revolutionary, or seditious in any way. It is trying to make things work when a system begins to fail. There is a big difference, and I am sure people can see that. If big oil and coal are failing us, they need to be replaced. That is not a revolutionary statement, rather one made by necessity. If Cold War ideology is no longer functional, and causes more problems than it helps, it has, by need, to go. If you think about what parts of your life no longer work as they should, it is then ok, I feel, to take action to make changes until you are all right again.

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      BRAVO! Moreover, this is evolution. It is for our own good to keep creating and innovating. The Luddites will always be obstinate because they are the last ones to the party. I highly recommend this book, "Chasing the Chasm" by Geoffrey A. Moore. A very good analysis of how and why people adopt new things.

      https://www.amazon.com/Crossing-Chasm-Marketing-High-Tech-Mainstream/dp/0060517123

      0_KIXz2tAVqXVREkyd.png

    2. (See 4 other replies to this status update)

  14. Thanks to Subterranean Books for letting me engage in my longest live jam ever-- nearly two hours. Here is most of the second hour, recorded live at the event. Among other sounds, the voice of local poetess Amanda Wells can be heard at points in the mix. 2018 Community Audio

     

     

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Nice! I am playing my first bookstore show next month. 

       

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  15. Hi there, 

    I seriously think you should spend 7 and a half minutes with this on in the background (or foreground). 
    It was recorded and mixed during 14 hours on Sunday 23rd September 2018. Enjoy. 😊

    https://iancraig1.bandcamp.com/track/lemony-melony-fell-on-e

     

  16. Jack Hertz recordings on this week's Deprogramming Center radio broadcast!.  Distracted by family feline health concerns, I missed posting an announcement for this program here for all of you late night radio listeners in California's wine country.  But you can still hear this show (for the next couple of weeks at least) at the link below.  A little background on our Encyclotronic host and some spacy (literally) music for your entertainment and edification.  This show also features long term recording artist and another spacy composer, Phil Klampe.

    https://archive.org/details/TheDeprogrammingCenter71

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      FYI, for all you radio DJs, you also have a comments section on your show calendar page that you can, and should, make regular updates to. Might be more accessible to people who look at the calendar, if that's preferred. (Y)

       

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

  17. Rare Excerpts From K. Schulze Recordings will be broadcast this Friday at KOWS in California.  The show is The Deprogramming Center.  The recordings were part of a huge collection which once belonged to the late Doug Walker of the legendary Space Rock group:  Alien Planetscapes.  They were made available by Jerry Kranitz of Aural Innovations and edited by KOWS DJ Swami Loopynanda. 

    You can hear the show live on KOWS, this Saturday, July 21st, 12:00 AM USA PACIFIC DAYLIGHT TIME (Friday Midnight) here:

    KOWS

    Or, anytime for the next month here (this show will disappear in a couple of weeks):

    Deprogramming Center #69

    https://archive.org/details/TheDeprogrammingCenter69

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      BTW, these kinds of posts will get more notice if you put them in the Calendar.

      The status updates are not show to everyone or archived.

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  18. Rare Excerpts From K. Schulze Recordings will be broadcast this Friday at KOWS in California.  The show is The Deprogramming Center.  The recordings were part of a huge collection which once belonged to the late Doug Walker of the legendary Space Rock group:  Alien Planetscapes.  They were made available by Jerry Kranitz of Aural Innovations and edited by KOWS DJ Swami Loopynanda. 

    You can hear the show live on KOWS, this Saturday, July 21st, 12:00 AM USA PACIFIC DAYLIGHT TIME (Friday Midnight) here:

    KOWS

    Or, anytime for the next month here (this show will disappear in a couple of weeks):

    Deprogramming Center #69

    https://archive.org/details/TheDeprogrammingCenter69

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      WOW! Will have to tune for that. I am a HUGE fan of Klaus Schulze. 

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  19. "Dronal Tap"-- The Documentary: A short history of live looping performance in the MidWest USA:

     

  20. The REAL, gritty, no-held-punches story of mystified's music career:

     

     

  21. A Visit To The Raymond Scott Sound Archive


    There exists at the University Of Missouri in Kansas City a huge research library of sound recordings, called the "Marr Sound Archive."  My wife, Karen, and I took a little trip there on Monday, June 4, to listen to a few rare tapes made by the legendary Raymond Scott.  We had a unique and very pleasant experience.

    The Marr Archive houses copies of millions of records, cylinders, tapes, CDs, digital audio files -- all sizes, shapes, lengths, etc. -- all types of artists from all over the world.  There are several "special" collections there as well, including the most extensive collection of Raymond Scott recordings anywhere.  The Scott collection contains not only commercially-released productions, but lots and lots of one-of-a-kind items recorded on lathe cut lacquer disks and reel to reel tapes -- radio shows, practice sessions, electronic sound experiments, etc.

    Raymond Scott  was a genius musician and arranger, and was also the inventor of some of the earliest electronic synthesizers.  His work influenced artists all over the world from the 1930's to the 1980's, and continues to do so today.  His jazz and orchestral recordings are quirky and inventive; some have become permanently embedded in the public consciousness due to Warner Brothers purchasing and adapting them as soundtracks for Looney Toons.  In the 1940's, Scott started creating all sorts of electronic instruments and playing around with recording technology, producing sounds that human beings had never heard (nor imagined) before.  For more extensive background on Scott, go here:

    Official Raymond Scott Website

    The Marr Archive is a research library, and the staff is very mindful of copyrights. Appointments for listening must be arranged in advance, and listening is only allowed in-house (no internet audio files are available).  For the sake of preserving rare recordings, guests don't get to handle original materials and only get to listen to digitized audio.   Many of the Scott recordings at the library have been digitized, but some haven't, and if you want to hear something that isn't digitized, you are obliged to pay $70/hour for a technician to digitize it for you.  To offset all of these rules, the staff at the archive is very helpful and welcoming to guests, which makes a trip to the library a fun and easy experience (at least it was for us).   For more information about the Raymond Scott collection, go here: 

    Marr Archive Raymond Scott Collection 

    Karen and I arranged to hear four recordings while we were there -- about 1 1/2 hours of material.   The library specialist with whom I arranged our visit, Andrew Hansbrough, had prepared a computer terminal with the materials I requested, but he went well beyond that in welcoming us to the Marr Archive.  He gave us a personal tour of the entire place.  This included demonstrations of some very ancient sound equipment and of the GIANT robot system that retrieves huge palettes of recordings from a vault that extends up several floors into a huge dark void.  Among other unique items, he showed us some 20 inch disks made of lacquer on glass during the 1940's (the USA needed all its metal for the war effort back then).   Really nice guy!

    The recordings that Karen and I heard included tapes of experiments made with various versions of Scott's "Electronium" and one tape of advertisement out takes from 1960.  None of this stuff has ever been made available to the general public outside of the Marr Archive.  The electronium materials were as engaging as any electronic music I've ever heard, ranging in form from rhythmic sounds, to lovely washes, to complete dissonant wildness.  The 1960 adverts we heard were obviously being arranged on the spot with some very talented musicians -- the same products (and verbiage) being presented and re-presented in all sorts of genres and styles to determine how best to sell them.

    Special thanks to Encyclotronic's Jack Hertz for placing the Raymond Scott Sound Archive into my awareness several months ago -- this is truly something that all Kansas City musicians and recording artists should know about and visit!

     

    01.SeventyEightRPMCollection.jpg

    03.GoffHansbroughRecord.jpg

    04.Ediphone.jpg

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Wowie! I am so glad you managed to make out there. What an amazing thing. I am going to have to visit one of these days. Really and truly, I will. 

      If you liked that. Maybe you can make it to the Festival in September?

       

  22. Site is looking great , Jack!

    1. Jack Hertz

      Jack Hertz

      Thanks man! Just keeps on rolling along. Cheers! :pd:

       

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