Jack Hertz

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Jack Hertz last won the day on August 19

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About Jack Hertz

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    Advanced Member

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    Male
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    Bay Area, CA
  • Interests
    Sound Design, FM Synthesis, Publishing, Improvised music, Music Concrete, Digital Synthesis, Visual Design, Video Production, Software Development, Unix, Outdoors, Spirituality, Reading, Publishing

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  1. OB-X Neo

    The OB-X Neo appears to be a pending modern clone of the Oberheim OB-X in a module format. Just a teaser has been released. More news to be added as soon as it is available.
  2. Topic: OB-X Neo

    The OB-X Neo appears to be a pending modern clone of the Oberheim OB-X in a module format. Just a teaser has been released. More news to be added as soon as it is available. View full synthesizer
  3. Yamaha VOCALOID VKB-100

    VOCALOID is a voice synthesis technology and software developed by Yamaha. Just put in a melody and lyrics and your virtual singer will sing for you. Adjust the detailed settings to change the singing style however you like. There's also a wonderful variety of Voice Banks. Choose a voice and character you like to match the music you want to make.
  4. Topic: Yamaha VOCALOID VKB-100

    VOCALOID is a voice synthesis technology and software developed by Yamaha. Just put in a melody and lyrics and your virtual singer will sing for you. Adjust the detailed settings to change the singing style however you like. There's also a wonderful variety of Voice Banks. Choose a voice and character you like to match the music you want to make. View full synthesizer
  5. Tomorrow is here -> ENTROPIA!

     

  6. This program profiles the innovative musician Brian Eno. Originally a member of the band Roxy Music, Eno turned his visionary sights on the art world. Using his talents to create electronically generated music video art, Eno produced works that have been featured in art museums throughout the world. An in-depth interview with the artist is interspersed with a sampling of his mind-expanding works. View full movie
  7. This program profiles the innovative musician Brian Eno. Originally a member of the band Roxy Music, Eno turned his visionary sights on the art world. Using his talents to create electronically generated music video art, Eno produced works that have been featured in art museums throughout the world. An in-depth interview with the artist is interspersed with a sampling of his mind-expanding works.
  8. The Delian Mode is a short experimental documentary revolving around the life and work of electronic music pioneer Delia Derbyshire, best known for her groundbreaking sound treatment of the Doctor Who theme music. A collage of sound and image created in the spirit of Derbyshire’s unique approach to audio creation and manipulation, this film illuminates such soundscapes onscreen while paying tribute to a woman whose work has influenced electronic musicians for decades. The film features interviews with Brian Hodgson and Dick Mills of the now defunct BBC Radiophonic Workshop, the founder of Electronic Music Studios Peter Zinovieff, musicians Peter Kember (Sonic Boom), Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Ann Shenton (Add N to X) as well as other friends and colleagues of Delia. Featuring Mark Ayres Ayres has been composing music for film and television since 1984 and is best known for his work on the most recent Doctor Who programs. He has been responsible for cataloguing, restoring and archiving the work of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop since its closure in 1998. Clive Blackburn Blackburn met Delia in 1980 and became her life partner until her death in 2001. Brian Hodgson Hodgson was employed at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop at the same time as Derbyshire and later became the department’s organizer. He and Delia collaborated on several projects outside the BBC and maintained a life-long friendship. Peter Kember Kember is a musician who has worked under the names Spectrum, Sonic Boom and E.A.R. (Experimental Audio Research). As a result of Kember contacting Derbyshire in the early 1990’s he encouraged her return to music and was one of the last people to collaborate with Delia creatively. Dick Mills One of the first staff of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Mills worked there for 40 years creating sound effects for radio and television. He assisted Delia in the realization of the Doctor Who theme. Ann Shenton Part of the now defunct London based electronic band Add N to (X), Shenton currently performs music with the group Large Number. Shenton curates a compilation CD series entitled The Electronic Bible which included the collaborative piece by Derbyshire and Kember recorded in 2000. Alan Sutcliffe Sutcliffe is one of the founding members of the Computer Arts Society, established to promote the creative use of computers and met Delia at a music conference in the 1960s. Adrian Utley Ultey is a revered artist in the music world and one of the driving forces behind the popular band Portishead. David Vorhaus Vorhaus became Derbyshire’s protégé after hearing her lecture on electronic music. The two, along with Brian Hodgson formed the first incarnation of the band White Noise in 1969. The band’s first release was the groundbreaking album An Electric Storm featuring a variety of tape manipulation techniques and use of the VCS3 synthesizer developed by EMS. Peter Zinovieff Founder of the company EMS (Electronic Music Studios), Zinovieff is a musician and inventor. EMS was at the forefront of using the first computer technology for musical applications and was responsible for the creation of early synthesizers like the VCS3 used by the Radiophonic Workshop and many musical acts including Pink Floyd. Zinovieff briefly collaborated with Brian Hodgson and Delia under the name Unit Delta Plus. View full movie
  9. The Delian Mode is a short experimental documentary revolving around the life and work of electronic music pioneer Delia Derbyshire, best known for her groundbreaking sound treatment of the Doctor Who theme music. A collage of sound and image created in the spirit of Derbyshire’s unique approach to audio creation and manipulation, this film illuminates such soundscapes onscreen while paying tribute to a woman whose work has influenced electronic musicians for decades. The film features interviews with Brian Hodgson and Dick Mills of the now defunct BBC Radiophonic Workshop, the founder of Electronic Music Studios Peter Zinovieff, musicians Peter Kember (Sonic Boom), Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Ann Shenton (Add N to X) as well as other friends and colleagues of Delia. Featuring Mark Ayres Ayres has been composing music for film and television since 1984 and is best known for his work on the most recent Doctor Who programs. He has been responsible for cataloguing, restoring and archiving the work of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop since its closure in 1998. Clive Blackburn Blackburn met Delia in 1980 and became her life partner until her death in 2001. Brian Hodgson Hodgson was employed at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop at the same time as Derbyshire and later became the department’s organizer. He and Delia collaborated on several projects outside the BBC and maintained a life-long friendship. Peter Kember Kember is a musician who has worked under the names Spectrum, Sonic Boom and E.A.R. (Experimental Audio Research). As a result of Kember contacting Derbyshire in the early 1990’s he encouraged her return to music and was one of the last people to collaborate with Delia creatively. Dick Mills One of the first staff of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Mills worked there for 40 years creating sound effects for radio and television. He assisted Delia in the realization of the Doctor Who theme. Ann Shenton Part of the now defunct London based electronic band Add N to (X), Shenton currently performs music with the group Large Number. Shenton curates a compilation CD series entitled The Electronic Bible which included the collaborative piece by Derbyshire and Kember recorded in 2000. Alan Sutcliffe Sutcliffe is one of the founding members of the Computer Arts Society, established to promote the creative use of computers and met Delia at a music conference in the 1960s. Adrian Utley Ultey is a revered artist in the music world and one of the driving forces behind the popular band Portishead. David Vorhaus Vorhaus became Derbyshire’s protégé after hearing her lecture on electronic music. The two, along with Brian Hodgson formed the first incarnation of the band White Noise in 1969. The band’s first release was the groundbreaking album An Electric Storm featuring a variety of tape manipulation techniques and use of the VCS3 synthesizer developed by EMS. Peter Zinovieff Founder of the company EMS (Electronic Music Studios), Zinovieff is a musician and inventor. EMS was at the forefront of using the first computer technology for musical applications and was responsible for the creation of early synthesizers like the VCS3 used by the Radiophonic Workshop and many musical acts including Pink Floyd. Zinovieff briefly collaborated with Brian Hodgson and Delia under the name Unit Delta Plus.
  10. Note: This is a radio show that is too valuable a document not to include. The broadcaster and Doctor Who fan MATTHEW SWEET travels to The University of Manchester - home of Delia Derbyshire's private collection of audio recordings - to learn more about the wider career and working methods of the woman who realised Ron Grainer's original theme to Doctor Who. Delia's collection of tapes was, until recently, in the safekeeping of MARK AYRES, archivist for the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Matthew meets up at Manchester University with Mark, along with Delia's former colleagues from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, BRIAN HODGSON and DICK MILLS - plus former 'White Noise' band member DAVID VORHAUS - to hear extracts from the archive, discuss their memories of Delia and the creative process behind some of her material. Her realisation of the Doctor Who theme is just one small example of her genius and we'll demonstrate how the music was originally created as well as hearing individual tracks from Delia's aborted 70's version. We'll also feature the make up tapes for her celebrated piece 'Blue Veils and Golden Sands', and hear Delia being interviewed on a previously 'lost' BBC recording from the 1960s. Matthew's journey of discovery will take in work with the influential poet Barry Bermange, as well as her 1971 piece marking the centenary of the Institution of Electrical Engineers. This Archive on 4 is brought up to date with an individual track from 'The Dance' from the children's programme 'Noah'. Recorded in the late 1960s this remarkable tape sounds like a contemporary dance track which wouldn't be out of place in today's most 'happening' trance clubs. View full movie
  11. Note: This is a radio show that is too valuable a document not to include. The broadcaster and Doctor Who fan MATTHEW SWEET travels to The University of Manchester - home of Delia Derbyshire's private collection of audio recordings - to learn more about the wider career and working methods of the woman who realised Ron Grainer's original theme to Doctor Who. Delia's collection of tapes was, until recently, in the safekeeping of MARK AYRES, archivist for the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Matthew meets up at Manchester University with Mark, along with Delia's former colleagues from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, BRIAN HODGSON and DICK MILLS - plus former 'White Noise' band member DAVID VORHAUS - to hear extracts from the archive, discuss their memories of Delia and the creative process behind some of her material. Her realisation of the Doctor Who theme is just one small example of her genius and we'll demonstrate how the music was originally created as well as hearing individual tracks from Delia's aborted 70's version. We'll also feature the make up tapes for her celebrated piece 'Blue Veils and Golden Sands', and hear Delia being interviewed on a previously 'lost' BBC recording from the 1960s. Matthew's journey of discovery will take in work with the influential poet Barry Bermange, as well as her 1971 piece marking the centenary of the Institution of Electrical Engineers. This Archive on 4 is brought up to date with an individual track from 'The Dance' from the children's programme 'Noah'. Recorded in the late 1960s this remarkable tape sounds like a contemporary dance track which wouldn't be out of place in today's most 'happening' trance clubs.
  12. Shbobo Shtar

    The neck is marked, with neutral intervals in brass and power chords in steel. 33 frets control computer music, with heart transducer (sensing pressure) and bridge pickup. Two knobs aux Eurorack inputs. Three modes of production: acoustic; add computer music; multiply by computer music (stereo ring mod). USB interfaces to host as does the SHNTH. There is a red light.
  13. Topic: Shbobo Shtar

    The neck is marked, with neutral intervals in brass and power chords in steel. 33 frets control computer music, with heart transducer (sensing pressure) and bridge pickup. Two knobs aux Eurorack inputs. Three modes of production: acoustic; add computer music; multiply by computer music (stereo ring mod). USB interfaces to host as does the SHNTH. There is a red light. View full synthesizer
  14. Filmmusik 2 by Conrad Schnitzler

    n the year 1975 Conrad Schnitzler recorded various pieces of music to accompany films which had yet to be made. Fittingly, he labelled this collection of songs "Filmmusik". The music is extraordinarily accessible for Schnitzler: hypnotic bass lines, stoic drum rhythms, dark drones, crystalline shards of melody. "Filmmusik 2" features five tracks from the 1975 recordings plus one 23 minute track called "Lichtpunkte und schwarze Zeichen", recorded in 1978 for Schnitzler's film project of the same name.
  15. Filmmusik 1 by Conrad Schnitzler

    In the sprawling archive of German avant garde electronic musician Conrad Schnitzler (1937–2011), there are two tapes marked "Filmmusik 1975 A" and "Filmmusik 1980 B". It is hard to say which videos this music belongs to, particularly as the pieces have been left untitled. "Filmmusik 1" presents an initial selection of these finds, presented to us by Schnitzler's musical partner for many years and guardian of the archive, Wolfgang Seidel. The music on the "Filmmusik" tapes is extraordinarily accessible for Schnitzler: hypnotic bass lines, stoic drum rhythms, dark drones, crystalline shards of melody.