Jack Hertz

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About Jack Hertz

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    Bay Area, CA
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    Sound Design, FM Synthesis, Publishing, Improvised music, Music Concrete, Digital Synthesis, Visual Design, Video Production, Software Development, Unix, Outdoors, Spirituality, Reading, Publishing

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  1. What a surprise to see my Computer Music Collection album nominated in the 2017 Schallwelle Awards. That is enough of an award to know people are listening to my challenging releases. Please download the album now at https://auralfilms.bandcamp.com/album/computer-music

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  2. until
    The Seventh Wave Festival of Electronic Music: Number 5 Friday 09 March 2018 – Sunday 11 March 2018 Fifth Electronic Music Festival comes to Birmingham and this time around it includes an all-day free electronic music event featuring talks, demonstrations, interactive sessions, synth manufacturer attendance, a room for attendees to set up and show off their synth gear and a number of free live performances! In March of 2018 the fifth ‘The Seventh Wave Festival of Electronic Music’ takes place across three days. For a relatively small festival The Seventh Wave continues to get some of the biggest names in electronic and progressive music. This time around you can feast your eyes (and ears!) on Wolfgang Flur (Ex-Kraftwerk) who, let’s not forget, is one of the original members of Kraftwerk and Ulrich Schnauss, who as well as being a distinguished solo performer in his own right is a ‘modern day’ member of electronic giants Tangerine Dream. To cap it all, the Festival finishes with Ian Boddy (DiN Record Label Owner) who is one of the founding fathers of the electronic music scene in the United Kingdom. Read more - https://seventhwavefestivalofelectronicmusic.com/about/
  3. The OSCar was a synthesizer manufactured by the Oxford Synthesiser Company from 1983 to 1985. It was ahead of its time in several ways and was one of the few mono-synths of its time to have MIDI. View full synthesizer
  4. The OSCar was a synthesizer manufactured by the Oxford Synthesizer Company from 1983 to 1985. It was ahead of its time in several ways and was one of the few mono-synths of its time to have MIDI. Although the basic structure of the OSCar is the common subtractive synthesis model, it has many unusual features and design quirks. The main difference from other synthesizers of the time was its digital oscillators and control system. The oscillators have an array of standard wave shapes including triangle, sawtooth, square and a variable pulse-width modulation, but the digital system also provides additive synthesis. New waveforms can be created by changing the amplitudes of up to 24 harmonics, widening the available sound palette in comparison with purely analogue synths. The two oscillators can either be played together mono phonically, or the OSCar can be set in a duophonic mode where they keyboard controls one oscillator and the sequencer the other. The filter was actually two 12dB/Oct analog filters that can be combined into either a 24dB low pass, a 24dB high pass or a 12dB bandpass filter. Although this design appeared in other analog synths of the era, such as the Roland Jupiter-6, the OSCar has its own unique twist on it, by having a "Separation" control that allowed you to separate the filters' cutoff frequencies. This created two resonance peaks in the filter, giving a unique "vocal" character. The OSCar has an elementary sequencer. In duophonic mode it allows the user to play a monophonic lead whilst a sequence plays simultaneously. Many sequencers at the time only allowed notes of a fixed length to be used in their sequencers but on the OSCar it was possible to lengthen individual notes or insert spaces.
  5. Monument by Ultravox

    Monument, released in 1983, is a live album by the British band Ultravox. It is the soundtrack to the live video of the same name, recorded at the London Hammersmith Odeon during the band's 1982 "Monument" tour. The opening title track is not live and is identical to the version found on the B-side of the "Hymn" single. The album peaked at no.9 on the UK album chart and was certified Gold by the BPI in January 1984 for 100,000 copies sold. The album was re-issued on CD in 1999 and was expanded, containing all of the songs from the video (but still not the entire concert). Monument was released again in 2009, as a CD/DVD package together. View full movie
  6. Monument by Ultravox

    Monument, released in 1983, is a live album by the British band Ultravox. It is the soundtrack to the live video of the same name, recorded at the London Hammersmith Odeon during the band's 1982 "Monument" tour. The opening title track is not live and is identical to the version found on the B-side of the "Hymn" single. The album peaked at no.9 on the UK album chart and was certified Gold by the BPI in January 1984 for 100,000 copies sold. The album was re-issued on CD in 1999 and was expanded, containing all of the songs from the video (but still not the entire concert). Monument was released again in 2009, as a CD/DVD package together.
  7. The Dark Interpreter operates as contagious sample or village granulator, distortion, and unique sound generator based on a speedy ARM processor allowing for 16 bit sampling at 48KHz, and with a sample memory of around one second (vastly extended by undersampling). View full synthesizer
  8. The Dark Interpreter Mater Tenebrarum

    The truth I heard often in sleep from the lips of the Dark Interpreter. Who is he? He is a shadow, reader, but a shadow with whom you must suffer me to make you acquainted. The Dark Interpreter operates as contagious sample or village granulator, distortion, and unique sound generator based on a speedy ARM processor allowing for 16 bit sampling at 48KHz, and with a sample memory of around one second (vastly extended by undersampling). The Dark Interpreter is delivered in three versions, all fully assembled and tested, and features high quality ALPS potentiometers, optional BOSS style 9v power socket (+9v/positive on the outside, negative centre, minimum 300mA) or battery clip, and now full size (6.5mm) Neutrik JACK input and output sockets. Please note that versions cannot be extended, they are not cross-compatible.
  9. Ligand by MARTIN NONSTATIC

    An electrifying stratosphere of vibrant realms and enchanting tonalities evolves with every breath of Martin Nonstatic’s hand-crafted synthscapes. Gently progressing into a dubby waterfall of mind-massaging oscillations, Ligand is an ambient downpour of dramatic euphoria. Dark, yet soulful minimalism is engraved within the atmospheric frequencies that paint its melancholy walls, a downtempo outcry of distant, mechanical pads and dystopian melodies crawling against an auditory horizon. The experience is an emotional voyage ; it takes us on a captivating journey into a faraway dimension without ever having to leave earth. It feels like a second home, and we invite you through its welcoming doors to explore a brand new world.
  10. The Grendel RA-9 Grenadier is a 1-oscillator analog monosynth with CV-Gate control. It has a semi-modular design in a tabletop enclosure with 1/4″ audio output. The Grenadier can be played stand-alone by using its keypad with 4 independently tuneable keys, or you can activate its onboard sequencer for minimal rhythm loops and tone sequences. Patch in a 1v/oct MIDI-CV converter (not included) and the Grenadier can play sequences from a MIDI workstation or computer. View full synthesizer
  11. The Grendel RA-9 Grenadier is a 1-oscillator analog monosynth with CV-Gate control. It has a semi-modular design in a tabletop enclosure with 1/4″ audio output. The Grenadier can be played stand-alone by using its keypad with 4 independently tuneable keys, or you can activate its onboard sequencer for minimal rhythm loops and tone sequences. Patch in a 1v/oct MIDI-CV converter (not included) and the Grenadier can play sequences from a MIDI workstation or computer. The Grenadier’s unique palette of analog tones comes from its triple bandpass filterbank with syncable modulation. Its voice is designed for electronic basslines and melodic sequences, as well as slow drones, electro percussion loops, bass drums, and more. The filterbank can also become a tone source by setting it to self-oscillate with warm low frequency overdrive. The Grenadier’s VCO offers square and triangle waveform. Its pitch can be modulated by the envelope generator for bass drops and other tuned analog percussion effects. The VCO waveform is synced to gate, for better bass output with staccato sequences. The decay envelope generator offers a wide range of decay times up to 60 seconds. The contour of the envelope can be reversed with the bipolar Envelope Depth knob, putting it solidly in the electro funk zone. The Grenadier’s LFO covers a wide range of 0.05 Hz (that’s once cycle every 20 seconds) up to 60 Hz, and can be reset by gate events for tempo-sync effects. The patch bay allows semi-modular control and multiplies the creative options when patching to itself, another Grenadier, MIDI-CV converters, and modular systems.** Fourteen patch points are provided including CV and gate in and out, clock in and out, LFO rate CV, and external audio input. It accepts Eurorack-type 1/8” (3.5mm) mono phone plugs. The Grendel Grenadier has a straightforward knob-per-function layout that avoids confusing context-sensitive controls. Each switch on the front panel has a red status LED that is easy to see, but not glaringly bright. The case is built of laser-cut steel with durable powder coat and silkscreened graphics. It has a sturdy-feeling build, weighing in at nearly 2 pounds. Grippy rubber feet elevate it above the table, and a pair of polished metal handles double as a roll cage to protect its control surface. The Grenadier is built to satisfy the need for creative analog equipment that stands the test of time. Features 4-step analog sequencer that outputs control voltage in a repeating cycle I-II-III-IV. Voltage of each step is controlled by the knob above each key I-IV. It steps once to the right each time it is triggered. The analog sequencer normally controls the VCO frequency for simple melodic sequences, and can be patched to sequence the filterbank, LFO rate, or an external module. Programmable Trigger Loop: It is normally synchronized to the LFO, or you can patch 16th-notes tempo clock to CLK IN. Program a rhythmic sequence of events in a 32-step (2 measure) endless loop by tapping the PROG-+ button in real time. Your input is quantized to the clock and repeats as long as clock is present. The trigger events can step the analog sequencer, trigger the envelope, or trigger an external module using the TRIG OUT patch point. LFO; The rate can be controlled with the LFO CV IN patch point. Its response is exponential (~0.5v/oct) and its frequency range is 0.05-60 Hz. The symmetry of the triangle wave is variable and the pulse wave output can be varied from 20..80% width by using the Symmetry knob. Activate the TRIG button and the LFO will sync (restart) with each gate event. This can give the impression of tempo-synced LFO effects, and also lets you use the LFO like a second envelope generator for the filterbank. The LFO Depth knob sets the level of filterbank modulation, and is a bipolar gain type control. The LFO Out patch point is post-LFO Depth. The CLK Out patch point normally sends unattenuated LFO square wave. Drone Button: cancels the volume envelope for endless sustained notes. And its filterbank can be driven into deep-pitched overdriven self-oscillations. The Drone Commander has two fixed oscillators, while the Grenadier has one VCO. But the Grenadier goes further with the addition of a VCA and envelope generator, plenty of CV connections, and a minimal onboard sequencer. The Grenadier has CV and Gate Output, CV In and Gate In, Clock In, Clock Out, Alpha In and Beta In (CV inputs to control the filterbank’s 2-axis parameters), ENV Out, LFO Out, Trig Out, Osc Out (Disconnects OSC from Filter, this lets you use it as an FX send), Ext In (FX return or mix in an external VCO)
  12. Frank Zappa Birthday

    Frank Vincent Zappa (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American musician, composer, activist and filmmaker. His work was characterized by nonconformity, free-form improvisation, sound experiments, musical virtuosity, and satire of American culture. In a career spanning more than 30 years, Zappa composed rock, pop, jazz, jazz fusion, orchestraland musique concrète works, and produced almost all of the 60-plus albums that he released with his band the Mothers of Invention and as a solo artist. Zappa also directed feature-length films and music videos, and designed album covers. He is considered one of the most innovative and stylistically diverse rock musicians of his era. As a self-taught composer and performer, Zappa's diverse musical influences led him to create music that was sometimes difficult to categorize. While in his teens, he acquired a taste for 20th-century classical composers such as Edgard Varèse, Igor Stravinsky, and Anton Webern, along with 1950s rhythm and blues and doo-wop music.[6] He began writing classical music in high school, while at the same time playing drums in rhythm and blues bands; later switching to electric guitar. His 1966 debut album with the Mothers of Invention, Freak Out!, combined songs in conventional rock and roll format with collective improvisations and studio-generated sound collages. He continued this eclectic and experimental approach, irrespective of whether the fundamental format was rock, jazz or classical. Read more - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Zappa
  13. Bernard Parmegiani Birthday

    Bernard Parmegiani (27 October 1927 − 21 November 2013) was a French composer best known for his electronic or acousmatic music. Between 1957 and 1961 he studied mime with Jacques Lecoq, a period he later regarded as important to his work as a composer. He joined the Groupe de Recherches Musicales (GRM) in 1959 for a two-year master class, shortly after its founding by Pierre Schaeffer. After leaving his studies with Lecoq, he was first a sound engineer and was later put in charge of the Music/Image unit for French television (ORTF). There he worked in the studio with several notable composers, Iannis Xenakis, for example. Parmegiani composed his first major work, Violostries, for violin and tape in 1964 for a choreography performed for Théâtre Contemporain d'Amiens directed by Jacques-Albert Cartier. During a visit to America in the late 1960s, Parmegiani researched the link between music and video and on his return produced several musical videos, including L'Œil écoute, and L'Écran transparent (1973) during a residency at Westdeutscher Rundfunk in Germany. In the 1970s, he also became involved with live performances of jazz and performed with the Third Ear Band in London. Read more - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Parmegiani
  14. Tristram Cary Birthday

    Tristram Ogilvie Cary, OAM (14 May 1925 – 24 April 2008) was a pioneering English-Australian composer. He was also active as a teacher and music critic. His concert works of note include a Sonata for guitar (1959), Continuum for tape (1969), a cantata Peccata Mundi (1972), Contours and Densities at First Hill for orchestra (1972), a Nonet (1979), String Quartet No. 2 (1985) and The Dancing Girls for orchestra (1991). Cary is also particularly well known for his film and television music. He wrote music for the science fiction television series Doctor Who(including the first Dalek story), as well as the score for the Ealing comedy The Ladykillers (1955). Later film scores included Quatermass and the Pit (1967) and Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971), both for Hammer. He also composed the score for the ABC TV animated version of A Christmas Carol. and the children's Animated special Katya and the Nutcracker. Read more - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tristram_Cary
  15. In Luv by MTA Lab

    MTA Lab is a new project from a cooperation of friends around Thomas Meier, aka TM Solver. The trio plays the basic structures live, then the recording is being edited and mastered in the studio of TM Solver. M for Marcel Margis T for Thomas Meier (TM Solver) A for Andre Danker The three musicians were inspired to create an own project by different concerts of other electronic bands, they visited. The Album "In Luv" is the second album by this trio. An emphasis is to be found in hardwaresampling.