Jack Hertz

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Everything posted by Jack Hertz

  1. OB-X Neo

    The OB-X Neo appears to be a pending modern clone of the Oberheim OB-X in a module format. Just a teaser has been released. More news to be added as soon as it is available.
  2. Topic: OB-X Neo

    The OB-X Neo appears to be a pending modern clone of the Oberheim OB-X in a module format. Just a teaser has been released. More news to be added as soon as it is available. View full synthesizer
  3. Topic: Yamaha VOCALOID VKB-100

    VOCALOID is a voice synthesis technology and software developed by Yamaha. Just put in a melody and lyrics and your virtual singer will sing for you. Adjust the detailed settings to change the singing style however you like. There's also a wonderful variety of Voice Banks. Choose a voice and character you like to match the music you want to make. View full synthesizer
  4. Yamaha VOCALOID VKB-100

    VOCALOID is a voice synthesis technology and software developed by Yamaha. Just put in a melody and lyrics and your virtual singer will sing for you. Adjust the detailed settings to change the singing style however you like. There's also a wonderful variety of Voice Banks. Choose a voice and character you like to match the music you want to make.
  5. Tomorrow is here -> ENTROPIA!

     

  6. This program profiles the innovative musician Brian Eno. Originally a member of the band Roxy Music, Eno turned his visionary sights on the art world. Using his talents to create electronically generated music video art, Eno produced works that have been featured in art museums throughout the world. An in-depth interview with the artist is interspersed with a sampling of his mind-expanding works.
  7. This program profiles the innovative musician Brian Eno. Originally a member of the band Roxy Music, Eno turned his visionary sights on the art world. Using his talents to create electronically generated music video art, Eno produced works that have been featured in art museums throughout the world. An in-depth interview with the artist is interspersed with a sampling of his mind-expanding works. View full movie
  8. The Delian Mode is a short experimental documentary revolving around the life and work of electronic music pioneer Delia Derbyshire, best known for her groundbreaking sound treatment of the Doctor Who theme music. A collage of sound and image created in the spirit of Derbyshire’s unique approach to audio creation and manipulation, this film illuminates such soundscapes onscreen while paying tribute to a woman whose work has influenced electronic musicians for decades. The film features interviews with Brian Hodgson and Dick Mills of the now defunct BBC Radiophonic Workshop, the founder of Electronic Music Studios Peter Zinovieff, musicians Peter Kember (Sonic Boom), Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Ann Shenton (Add N to X) as well as other friends and colleagues of Delia. Featuring Mark Ayres Ayres has been composing music for film and television since 1984 and is best known for his work on the most recent Doctor Who programs. He has been responsible for cataloguing, restoring and archiving the work of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop since its closure in 1998. Clive Blackburn Blackburn met Delia in 1980 and became her life partner until her death in 2001. Brian Hodgson Hodgson was employed at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop at the same time as Derbyshire and later became the department’s organizer. He and Delia collaborated on several projects outside the BBC and maintained a life-long friendship. Peter Kember Kember is a musician who has worked under the names Spectrum, Sonic Boom and E.A.R. (Experimental Audio Research). As a result of Kember contacting Derbyshire in the early 1990’s he encouraged her return to music and was one of the last people to collaborate with Delia creatively. Dick Mills One of the first staff of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Mills worked there for 40 years creating sound effects for radio and television. He assisted Delia in the realization of the Doctor Who theme. Ann Shenton Part of the now defunct London based electronic band Add N to (X), Shenton currently performs music with the group Large Number. Shenton curates a compilation CD series entitled The Electronic Bible which included the collaborative piece by Derbyshire and Kember recorded in 2000. Alan Sutcliffe Sutcliffe is one of the founding members of the Computer Arts Society, established to promote the creative use of computers and met Delia at a music conference in the 1960s. Adrian Utley Ultey is a revered artist in the music world and one of the driving forces behind the popular band Portishead. David Vorhaus Vorhaus became Derbyshire’s protégé after hearing her lecture on electronic music. The two, along with Brian Hodgson formed the first incarnation of the band White Noise in 1969. The band’s first release was the groundbreaking album An Electric Storm featuring a variety of tape manipulation techniques and use of the VCS3 synthesizer developed by EMS. Peter Zinovieff Founder of the company EMS (Electronic Music Studios), Zinovieff is a musician and inventor. EMS was at the forefront of using the first computer technology for musical applications and was responsible for the creation of early synthesizers like the VCS3 used by the Radiophonic Workshop and many musical acts including Pink Floyd. Zinovieff briefly collaborated with Brian Hodgson and Delia under the name Unit Delta Plus.
  9. The Delian Mode is a short experimental documentary revolving around the life and work of electronic music pioneer Delia Derbyshire, best known for her groundbreaking sound treatment of the Doctor Who theme music. A collage of sound and image created in the spirit of Derbyshire’s unique approach to audio creation and manipulation, this film illuminates such soundscapes onscreen while paying tribute to a woman whose work has influenced electronic musicians for decades. The film features interviews with Brian Hodgson and Dick Mills of the now defunct BBC Radiophonic Workshop, the founder of Electronic Music Studios Peter Zinovieff, musicians Peter Kember (Sonic Boom), Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Ann Shenton (Add N to X) as well as other friends and colleagues of Delia. Featuring Mark Ayres Ayres has been composing music for film and television since 1984 and is best known for his work on the most recent Doctor Who programs. He has been responsible for cataloguing, restoring and archiving the work of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop since its closure in 1998. Clive Blackburn Blackburn met Delia in 1980 and became her life partner until her death in 2001. Brian Hodgson Hodgson was employed at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop at the same time as Derbyshire and later became the department’s organizer. He and Delia collaborated on several projects outside the BBC and maintained a life-long friendship. Peter Kember Kember is a musician who has worked under the names Spectrum, Sonic Boom and E.A.R. (Experimental Audio Research). As a result of Kember contacting Derbyshire in the early 1990’s he encouraged her return to music and was one of the last people to collaborate with Delia creatively. Dick Mills One of the first staff of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Mills worked there for 40 years creating sound effects for radio and television. He assisted Delia in the realization of the Doctor Who theme. Ann Shenton Part of the now defunct London based electronic band Add N to (X), Shenton currently performs music with the group Large Number. Shenton curates a compilation CD series entitled The Electronic Bible which included the collaborative piece by Derbyshire and Kember recorded in 2000. Alan Sutcliffe Sutcliffe is one of the founding members of the Computer Arts Society, established to promote the creative use of computers and met Delia at a music conference in the 1960s. Adrian Utley Ultey is a revered artist in the music world and one of the driving forces behind the popular band Portishead. David Vorhaus Vorhaus became Derbyshire’s protégé after hearing her lecture on electronic music. The two, along with Brian Hodgson formed the first incarnation of the band White Noise in 1969. The band’s first release was the groundbreaking album An Electric Storm featuring a variety of tape manipulation techniques and use of the VCS3 synthesizer developed by EMS. Peter Zinovieff Founder of the company EMS (Electronic Music Studios), Zinovieff is a musician and inventor. EMS was at the forefront of using the first computer technology for musical applications and was responsible for the creation of early synthesizers like the VCS3 used by the Radiophonic Workshop and many musical acts including Pink Floyd. Zinovieff briefly collaborated with Brian Hodgson and Delia under the name Unit Delta Plus. View full movie
  10. Note: This is a radio show that is too valuable a document not to include. The broadcaster and Doctor Who fan MATTHEW SWEET travels to The University of Manchester - home of Delia Derbyshire's private collection of audio recordings - to learn more about the wider career and working methods of the woman who realised Ron Grainer's original theme to Doctor Who. Delia's collection of tapes was, until recently, in the safekeeping of MARK AYRES, archivist for the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Matthew meets up at Manchester University with Mark, along with Delia's former colleagues from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, BRIAN HODGSON and DICK MILLS - plus former 'White Noise' band member DAVID VORHAUS - to hear extracts from the archive, discuss their memories of Delia and the creative process behind some of her material. Her realisation of the Doctor Who theme is just one small example of her genius and we'll demonstrate how the music was originally created as well as hearing individual tracks from Delia's aborted 70's version. We'll also feature the make up tapes for her celebrated piece 'Blue Veils and Golden Sands', and hear Delia being interviewed on a previously 'lost' BBC recording from the 1960s. Matthew's journey of discovery will take in work with the influential poet Barry Bermange, as well as her 1971 piece marking the centenary of the Institution of Electrical Engineers. This Archive on 4 is brought up to date with an individual track from 'The Dance' from the children's programme 'Noah'. Recorded in the late 1960s this remarkable tape sounds like a contemporary dance track which wouldn't be out of place in today's most 'happening' trance clubs.
  11. Note: This is a radio show that is too valuable a document not to include. The broadcaster and Doctor Who fan MATTHEW SWEET travels to The University of Manchester - home of Delia Derbyshire's private collection of audio recordings - to learn more about the wider career and working methods of the woman who realised Ron Grainer's original theme to Doctor Who. Delia's collection of tapes was, until recently, in the safekeeping of MARK AYRES, archivist for the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Matthew meets up at Manchester University with Mark, along with Delia's former colleagues from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, BRIAN HODGSON and DICK MILLS - plus former 'White Noise' band member DAVID VORHAUS - to hear extracts from the archive, discuss their memories of Delia and the creative process behind some of her material. Her realisation of the Doctor Who theme is just one small example of her genius and we'll demonstrate how the music was originally created as well as hearing individual tracks from Delia's aborted 70's version. We'll also feature the make up tapes for her celebrated piece 'Blue Veils and Golden Sands', and hear Delia being interviewed on a previously 'lost' BBC recording from the 1960s. Matthew's journey of discovery will take in work with the influential poet Barry Bermange, as well as her 1971 piece marking the centenary of the Institution of Electrical Engineers. This Archive on 4 is brought up to date with an individual track from 'The Dance' from the children's programme 'Noah'. Recorded in the late 1960s this remarkable tape sounds like a contemporary dance track which wouldn't be out of place in today's most 'happening' trance clubs. View full movie
  12. Shbobo Shtar

    The neck is marked, with neutral intervals in brass and power chords in steel. 33 frets control computer music, with heart transducer (sensing pressure) and bridge pickup. Two knobs aux Eurorack inputs. Three modes of production: acoustic; add computer music; multiply by computer music (stereo ring mod). USB interfaces to host as does the SHNTH. There is a red light.
  13. Topic: Shbobo Shtar

    The neck is marked, with neutral intervals in brass and power chords in steel. 33 frets control computer music, with heart transducer (sensing pressure) and bridge pickup. Two knobs aux Eurorack inputs. Three modes of production: acoustic; add computer music; multiply by computer music (stereo ring mod). USB interfaces to host as does the SHNTH. There is a red light. View full synthesizer
  14. Filmmusik 1 by Conrad Schnitzler

    In the sprawling archive of German avant garde electronic musician Conrad Schnitzler (1937–2011), there are two tapes marked "Filmmusik 1975 A" and "Filmmusik 1980 B". It is hard to say which videos this music belongs to, particularly as the pieces have been left untitled. "Filmmusik 1" presents an initial selection of these finds, presented to us by Schnitzler's musical partner for many years and guardian of the archive, Wolfgang Seidel. The music on the "Filmmusik" tapes is extraordinarily accessible for Schnitzler: hypnotic bass lines, stoic drum rhythms, dark drones, crystalline shards of melody.
  15. Filmmusik 2 by Conrad Schnitzler

    n the year 1975 Conrad Schnitzler recorded various pieces of music to accompany films which had yet to be made. Fittingly, he labelled this collection of songs "Filmmusik". The music is extraordinarily accessible for Schnitzler: hypnotic bass lines, stoic drum rhythms, dark drones, crystalline shards of melody. "Filmmusik 2" features five tracks from the 1975 recordings plus one 23 minute track called "Lichtpunkte und schwarze Zeichen", recorded in 1978 for Schnitzler's film project of the same name.
  16. Roland give us a 2nd dip of #FreeSynthFirday with this offer of 30 days FREE use of the #D50 #synthesizer plugin and others in the Roland Cloud. More info and signup here - www.rolandcloud.com
  17. FreeSynthFriday this week's Synth is for those modular fans. The #Nord G2 Demo lets you build #synthesizers, drum machines and effects block by block. If you can think of it, the G2 will probably do it. Get the unlimited use mono voice, with some modules disabled, from Nord to be amazed at http://www.nordkeyboards.com/downloads/legacy/nord-modular-g2
  18. Our Hands Are Not True by PBK

    Our Hands Are Not True by PBK
  19. Luna Africana by Clara Mondshine

    CLARA MONDSHINE is a musical project of the late radio director, journalist and composer Walter Bachauer who for example used to work for RIAS Berlin in the 70s and 80s. Mr. Bachauer has also been involved as musician in Projects with electronic artist Peter Michael Hamel and kraut rock act BETWEEN back in the 70s. With CLARA MONDSHINE he was able to score three albums before his untimely passing in 1989 of which “Luna Africana” is the first from 1981 and it fits exactly into that era when the sluggish grinding of the early epic “cosmic music” had finally completely vanished and a new peppy drive could be felt with the spacious soundscapes of electronic music. Still rather low-fi with primitive machine grooves and swirling waves of analogue synthesizers to which some hypnotic drones were tastefully added, this music has learned a lot from the grand masters of the 70s and especially the so called “motorik” style of krautish electronics with rather simple melodic patterns and a very rhythmical approach with all those layers of pulses and drones piled upon repetitive structures to gain an effect on you as the listener which sets you into a state of trance. This music is quite imaginative and picturesque and the trip it will take you on leads you through a dark galaxy where only the starlight guides your vessel. Quite a typical example for the later krautish electronics and certainly a must have for fans of ENO / HARMONIA collaborations, CLUSTER “Zuckerzeit” and other similar “motorik” electronic albums. It also has a KRAFTWERK feel just without the vocals of course. Now this long hidden secret gem is unveiled for your stellar listening pleasure. But beware for some of you might get lost in the depth of outer space.
  20. 3-D: The Catalogue by Krafwerk

    This is the ground-breaking 3-D Kraftwerk concert brought thrillingly to life, developed using high definition 3-D visuals, with Dolby Atmos Surround Sound and presented to the technological and audio standards one would associate and indeed come to expect from the pioneering Germans led by founder Ralf Hütter. For the very first time, every Kraftwerk fan can now experience a "gesamtkunstwerk – a total work of art” in the comfort of their own home. Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue features new recordings of songs from Kraftwerk's 8 classic albums performed/filmed at various locations around the world between 2012-2016 and mixed at the band’s own state-of-the-art, Kling Klang studio, Düsseldorf. Released to coincide with Kraftwerk's forthcoming June 2017 tour - their first UK dates since the breathtaking shows witnessed at the Tate Modern in 2013 - Atlantic Records is proud to announce the release of Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue on May 26th. This is the ground-breaking 3-D Kraftwerk concert brought thrillingly to life developed using high definition 3-D with Dolby Atmos surround sound and presented to the technological and audio standards one would associate and indeed come to expect from the pioneering Germans led by founder Ralf Hütter. For the very first time, every Kraftwerk fan can now experience a "Gesamtkunstwerk - a total work of art" in the comfort of their own home. Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue is released across a number of formats including: Blu-Ray, DVD, Vinyl, CD and Download. Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue is a 3-D audio/video documentary of the Kraftwerk 3-D multi-media art performances in the leading museums of the world. It features 8 classic Kraftwerk albums in chronological order: Autobahn (1974), Radio-Activity (1975), Trans Europe Express (1977), The Man-Machine (1978), Computer World (1981), Techno Pop (1986), The Mix (1991) & Tour De France (2003) - filmed and recorded between 2012 and 2016 on the band's 3-D World Tour. The locations include MoMA (New York), The Tate Modern Turbine Hall (London), Akasaka Blitz (Tokyo), Opera House (Sydney), Norske Opera (Oslo), Paradiso (Amsterdam), Foundation Louis Vuitton (Paris) and Neue National Galerie (Berlin). These 3-D multi-media performances have been met with universal acclaim from both music critics and art/culture curators, rightfully recognized as complete works of audio-visual art.
  21. This is the ground-breaking 3-D Kraftwerk concert brought thrillingly to life, developed using high definition 3-D visuals, with Dolby Atmos Surround Sound and presented to the technological and audio standards one would associate and indeed come to expect from the pioneering Germans led by founder Ralf Hütter. For the very first time, every Kraftwerk fan can now experience a "gesamtkunstwerk – a total work of art” in the comfort of their own home. Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue features new recordings of songs from Kraftwerk's 8 classic albums performed/filmed at various locations around the world between 2012-2016 and mixed at the band’s own state-of-the-art, Kling Klang studio, Düsseldorf. Released to coincide with Kraftwerk's forthcoming June 2017 tour - their first UK dates since the breathtaking shows witnessed at the Tate Modern in 2013 - Atlantic Records is proud to announce the release of Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue on May 26th. This is the ground-breaking 3-D Kraftwerk concert brought thrillingly to life developed using high definition 3-D with Dolby Atmos surround sound and presented to the technological and audio standards one would associate and indeed come to expect from the pioneering Germans led by founder Ralf Hütter. For the very first time, every Kraftwerk fan can now experience a "Gesamtkunstwerk - a total work of art" in the comfort of their own home. Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue is released across a number of formats including: Blu-Ray, DVD, Vinyl, CD and Download. Kraftwerk 3-D: The Catalogue is a 3-D audio/video documentary of the Kraftwerk 3-D multi-media art performances in the leading museums of the world. It features 8 classic Kraftwerk albums in chronological order: Autobahn (1974), Radio-Activity (1975), Trans Europe Express (1977), The Man-Machine (1978), Computer World (1981), Techno Pop (1986), The Mix (1991) & Tour De France (2003) - filmed and recorded between 2012 and 2016 on the band's 3-D World Tour. The locations include MoMA (New York), The Tate Modern Turbine Hall (London), Akasaka Blitz (Tokyo), Opera House (Sydney), Norske Opera (Oslo), Paradiso (Amsterdam), Foundation Louis Vuitton (Paris) and Neue National Galerie (Berlin). These 3-D multi-media performances have been met with universal acclaim from both music critics and art/culture curators, rightfully recognized as complete works of audio-visual art. View full movie
  22. Small Craft on a Milk Sea by Brian Eno

    An Eno album all the way, but he does allow Abrahams and Hopkins to shine through at times. This would be a great album if we haven't been taken to these places so many times before by Mr Eno. There are hints of his many albums all over these tracks. Not a bad thing, but its starting to feel like Brian has few tricks in his bag. Still, there are some solid gems on this album such as "2 Forms of Anger" and "Calcium Needles" that add new sounds to Eno's vast sonic canvas.
  23. What is an "excess" of free speech? On the surface, it would seem to be a contradiction in terms. After all, the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States guarantees freedom of speech and expression, and as such, it would seem to be the Salient feature of a democratic society. However, in the late 20th century this idea is being challenged and new lines are being drawn. U.S. President George Bush decried the civil disobedience of the AIDS activist group ACT UP, when in 1990, they entered St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City and disrupted the service of Cardinal John J. O'Connor, whose much publicised virulent stance against the gay lifestyle and pro-choice advocates of the Women's Movement is believed by the members of the ACT UP to endanger the lives of millions of people. Bush described the action as an excessive use of free speech, igniting a storm of media and public reaction to the tactics of ACT UP. The result was intended to divert the public's attention away from the group's objectives to the "disrespect" all God-fearing, church-going Americans are supposed to believe has taken place. In this example, we can see the extent to which the Reagan-Bush "administration" will go to selectively dictate the "proper" use of the First Amendment and to subvert the outcome to suit their end. We have yet to hear Bush, his wife or any person connected to the government apply the concept of an "excess" of free speech to any of a myriad of organizations or individuals who are daily perpetrating physical, psychological and social harm on people with AIDS or in high-risk groups. These are the people who are in the greatest need of support and protection. Every day they lose jobs, health insurance, homes, families, and futures to a disease that cannot yet be cured and whose questionable origin ought to be the number one concern of all conscious Americans, but somehow is not. The objective of this work is to attempt to deal with the presentation of information and the manipulation of news to ensure a predetermined outcome. Considering the special interests of organized intelligence, organized religion, organized science/medicine, organized crime/entertainment, and the media as a conduit for the propaganda machinery of all these groups, the average person has virtually no chance of determining the truth about anything. We are thoroughly narcotized by the constant flow of "infotainment" and are rendered incapable of developing progressive attitudes or taking meaningful action. Lies of omission, misinformation, disinformation and the maintenance of "plausible deniability" are the uses to which our freedom of speech a4e being employed, and very much in excess.
  24. Small Craft on a Milk Sea by Brian Eno

    'The work in this collection is a result of an occasional collaboration between myself, Leo Abrahams and Jon Hopkins. The two of them are gifted young player/composers whose work, like mine, is intimately connected to the possibilities and freedoms of electronic music. Over the last few years we've worked together several times, enjoying exploring the huge new sonic territories now available to musicians. Mostly the pieces on this album resulted not from 'composition' in the classical sense, but from improvisation. The improvisations are not attempts to end up with a song, but rather with a landscape, a feeling of a place and perhaps the suggestion of an event. In a sense they deliberately lack 'personality': there is no singer, no narrator, no guide as to what you ought to be feeling. If these pieces had been used in films, the film would complete the picture. As they stand, they are the mirror-image of silent movies - sound-only movies.
  25. Mego Muson Synthesizer

    Mego, the same company that made action figures in the 1970s, tried their hand at a toy synthesizer that was actually pretty cool for its time. The Muson Synthesizer was somewhat limited sound creation wise with just an organ and synthesizer sounds. However, it had something many synths of the day didn't - A sequencer! Those color pegs above the white keys acted as switches for the note sequence. Spaces with a peg played a note. One without, played a rest. There were also controls for tempo, volume, and range.