Mystified

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Mystified last won the day on July 25

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About Mystified

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 08/27/1971

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Saint Louis, Missouri USA
  • Interests
    writing, painting, music

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  1.  

    From the debut release of Model 201, a musical act by Thomas Park that only uses sounds extracted from old analog cassettes as source material. Get the audio here: https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/series-1-model-201

  2. Here are some samples I have collected and/or created, which I offer for free. Most are cc-licensed, for use with attribution.

    Enjoy, and remember please to attribute (give credit).

    Spoken Word Samples:

    https://archive.org/details/SpokenWordSamples

    Tape Loops:

    https://archive.org/details/ThomasParkTapeLoops

    Shortwave Radio Outtakes:

    https://archive.org/details/HighFidelityShortwaveOuttakes

    Machine Sounds Outtakes:

    https://archive.org/details/MachinesOnMachinesSamples

    Shortwave Radio Sounds:

    https://archive.org/details/ShortwaveRadioInHighFidelity

    Machine Sounds:

    https://archive.org/details/MachinesByContactMicrophone

    Various Early Sound Experiments For Free Use:

    https://archive.org/details/mystified_Amalgam

    Urban Industrial Sounds Outtakes:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/urban-elements

    Urban Field Recordings:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/south-city-sounds

    Sferics Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sferics-samples

    Shortwave Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/shortwave-samples

    Fractal Noise Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/eclectic-noise-samples

    Space Sounds Outtakes:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/nasa-outtakes-sample-pack

    Urban Industrial Sounds Outtakes:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sounds-for-urban-discourse-part-2

    Urban Industrial Sounds Outtakes:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sounds-for-urban-discourse

    Treated Field Recordings:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/treated-field-recordings

    Harmonica Drones:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/harmonica-drones

    Fractal Drone Segments:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/fdrone-fragments

    Home Made Rhythm Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/various-home-made-rhythm-samples

    Various Wind Instrument Drone Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/various-wind-instrument-drone-samples

    Pan Pipes Drone Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/pan-pipes-drone-samples

    Flute Drone Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/flute-drone-samples

    Longform Recording of the a Rural Night:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/the-night

    Trombone Drone Samples:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/mystified-trombone-drone-samples
     

  3. “A Machine Music Manifesto” by Thomas Park

     

                    Earlier in 2017 I brought up some ideas for a “New Industrial Music”. A main component of this music involved using field recordings made of urban locations as sources. Rather than guitars and drum machines, actual recordings of the city were to be the source of sound. This idea has been further developed into a notion of ‘Machine Music”. Recordings of machines can be used as source material for this kind of composition, and the use of machines found in an urban setting makes Machine Music both its own variety and an extension of the New Industrial category.

                    I have made this observation, and my wife recently mentioned this of her own accord, that music on the radio follows certain formulae. She noticed that there were similarities between songs that went deeper than style, and got into using singers whose voices closely resembled one another, or the same technologies and instruments creating the same sounds (such as a use of “autotune”, which forces sounds, and especially vocals, to comply to a specific pitch). In a certain way, the mainstream music business is itself mechanical—methods and designs are used quite abstractly to generate products, much in the same way that factory machines do. Why not, then, simply express what is essential and make a music of machines?

                  Many forms of music already use or involve machines. Instruments are or resemble machines, as do devices used to record, including microphones and mixing decks, computers, and so forth. We master our sounds using software, on a computer. Files are burned to disc, or distributed online, passed from one machine to another and eventually to a mobile device or stereo.

                  Machine sounds themselves can be found in some music, especially in industrial music. A band might mix in a recording of factory equipment, or use power drills or similar devices as sonic sources, whether live on in the studio (such as the band Einsteurzende Neubauten). The machines create a supplemental voice in the mix, or are used as one or a few elements. I would propose that machines should become the dominant, or perhaps the only, sound source in a new type of music. How often do we need to hear a guitar, flute, or bongo? Why not explore and convey a new set of sounds made by mechanical devices?

                   Machines can make interesting and often rich sounds. A normal microphone can pick them up, but even better is a contact microphone. A contact mic is a small disc that is attached to a surface. It picks up the vibrations running through the surface, passing along the sounds manifested in its target. Contact mics are great for recording the various sounds that machines make as they turn on or off and run through their many cycles.

                     An excellent example of a machine as audio source is a washing machine. A washing machine produces literally dozens of sounds, as it moves from cycle to cycle. Each part of the washing process has its own sound, from the percolating sound of water filling the tank to various speeds of grind as the clothes are spun about. These sounds can be captured and further processed using audio software—excellent methods are to try various forms of granulation, or to add distortion or reverberation effects.

                    Composing using machine sounds can be as simple or as complex as needed. Many machine sounds are variations of noise (or noisy drones), and therefore they do not need to be tuned, and can be mixed together and layered freely. Occasional machine sounds have a pitch, which can be used as a source of tonality, or adjusted to match any other pitches using basic audio software.

                    What is the effect of such compositions? This may vary, but generally by using machine sounds, though some amount of noise exists within the pieces, it is quite easy to create a regular, repetitive, precise and meticulous kind of music. I would generally call these kinds of pieces “soundscapes”, as they are ambient drone collages of sound. The sounds in the pieces seem to come from the same sonic family, and indeed they do, having been recorded from similar sources. This effect is heightened if the same recording method is used throughout (for example, the same contact microphone, recording at the same fidelity). It is the case that machines provide their very own new category of instrumentation, and can harnessed to craft music with a very distinct aesthetic.

                    I hope that readers will consider furthering the New Industrial idea and developing a music of machines. It is a more honest approach to music, I feel, than regarding contemporary mainstream music as being anything other than mechanical itself. If a music is essentially of a machine, why not make it to sound that way? Machine Music provides a direct and authentic aesthetic of pragmatic, exact, and repetitive sounds, without using classical instruments or the human voice. Machine Music paves a clear path ahead in the world of music, and it is a good time to establish and explore this path.

     

  4. "Gamma" by Grid Resistor-- music made using only recordings of machines:

    https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/gamma-grid-resistor

    Free at Bandcamp.

    And don't miss the "Grid Resistor Playlist", steadily growing:

     

  5. Three essential playlists, in retrospect of Mystified:

    1. Full Albums: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9TuK-wqyd1Sh1sLWWmkoWhjYpV7XGuVf

    2. Vintage Mystified: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9TuK-wqyd1QDHftgnft8K1EwwIjRL9cj

    3. Longform: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9TuK-wqyd1Tm3GQXAn_3n4bHIbPzsKuM

    Follow my channel to bookmark these and other videos, plus to follow new "Grid Resistor" material. Thanks!
     

  6. 2 new High-Fidelity sample collections, for listening or using in music:

    1. Machines By Contact Microphone:

    https://archive.org/details/MachinesByContactMicrophone

    2. Shortwave Radio In High Fidelity:

    https://archive.org/details/ShortwaveRadioInHighFidelity

  7. Why all of these "Robin Storey"-related posts? A bit of explanation. When I first started writing music, I was trying to figure out what directions to take. I was searching for genres on a site called "Epitonic", and I ran across a category called "Drone" music. Drone music? What in heaven's name? Well, I began listening to some samples, and really got into the stuff, appreciating the uncanny and visceral qualities of this type of music. Robin's act Rapoon was listed as an example of drone, referencing several tracks from his album "Raising Earthly Spirits".

    I wanted to create my own drone music. Not sure where to find sounds, I bought samples, and found that Robin had created two excellent, imaginative, somewhat non-linear loop sets, and that the guy who set up loop sets for what was then Sonic Foundry was also a fan. A lot of my earlier musical attempts used sounds crafted by Robin. About this time, I asked Robin if he would be willing to make a mix using some of his own "Acid Loops", and he agreed. He created the "Robin Storey Transit Remix", using sounds I had assembled for my own piece, "Transit". So, in a way, the "Transit" remix was really Robin remixing himself.

    Years went by, and we lost touch. There were some reissues of his remix, I continued using his loops. At one point, I bought a painting of his, from his own "Tarot" deck.

    A couple of years ago, I wanted to make a point of what a great influence Robin had been, both on my music and the scene as a whole, so I created the "Loop Messiah" tribute netrelease, which is a great collection of tracks by various artists that pay tribute to the music of Rapoon. This was an unofficial tribute, but it did quite well, with thousands of downloads on archive.org.

    For a reason I can't describe, I felt that I should try contacting Robin once again. I found that the Abraxas project, and its loop30 series, curated by Gerald Fiebig, covered some historical and cultural themes that Robin had addressed in his music. When I opened a chat window to Robin, it was almost as though he knew why I was approaching him.

    Several months later, and we have "Grasslands Dream of Electric Sheep"-- the current iteration of Robin's influence on my career, and itself a wonderful and authentic piece of music, touching on themes of growing up in Cold War England, and daring to access an emotional range not often found in current music.

    So, there is the answer to the "Why all these Robin Storey" posts. I hope that i explained that well.

  8. Robin Storey of Rapoon was asked to design some music for the Abraxas cultural center. Abraxas is a building in Augsburg that was used as a military bunker for both German and Allied troops. More recently, it has become a museum that focuses on its past uses, and generally a center of culture. Robin's piece will be broadcast in Abraxas in the Fall of 2017 through Spring of 2018. Some of the sounds in this piece were furnished by Thomas Park (of Mystified). Robin remixed these sounds and added his own. Thomas would like to deeply thank Robin for the time he took from his busy life to create such an authentic and beautiful piece of music.


     

  9. Remember that Cyberpunk kid Kenji Siratori?

    Here's an album I did with him back in the day:

     

  10. https://mystified.bandcamp.com/album/sustain-the-unsustainable

    Daniel Barbiero sent Mystified some very nice sounds he had recorded with his double bass. Mystified processed these sounds and added his own to create this industrial soundscape. 

    Mystified thought of the title, as this seems to be a current problem, that people are asked to try to sustain systems that are in unsustainable conditions-- fossil fuel consumption, the environment, the economy-- both on micro and macro levels. 

    Sustain is also a musical term that means to hold a note. 

    We are asked to strike a chord and hold it-- and keep holding-- even when this seems unlikely or impossible. 

    Special thanks to Daniel for his participation and inspiration.

  11. Lots of bright, wide-open space and drifting melodies fill the room. Sounds very free, an enjoyable jam-like recording, must have been fun to create. Great cover art, too.
  12. A video written about our cities' troubled North Side. Music and images by Thomas Park/mystified.
  13. Morning City