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Benedict Roff-Marsh

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About Benedict Roff-Marsh

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  1. Isabel of Grey Abbey is a true concept album as it works to a clearly defined story. The story is in the form of a classic Gothic style morality tale. Don’t expect Goth or Metal as the musical style – even though I was influenced by King Diamond’s albums. All the music and artwork (see site and video) was done by myself. I wanted to work with a visual artist but I had no luck the few times I reached out. That meant I had to either shelve this in hope someone came along or get it done. I chose the latter. Background: Grey Abbey is a real place in Ireland. This story is not related in any other way than there was an abbey built there in the (then new) Gothic style which is now a ruin. The Story: The town is a small but basically happy place. The new Abbey has brought prosperity. Isabel is a young woman of 16 years. She is pretty and well known. Isabel has a natural affinity with animals and is commonly seen with a white rabbit that although wild, prefers her company to being with other rabbits. Grey Abbey is a new church built in the new Gothic style. A monastery is attached. Being a new Abbey, the monks & church leaders are very eager to be seen to be devout and protecting their community. Master Rupert Hopkins is the lazy but well-dressed son of successful businessman, Richard Hopkins. They are distant relatives of the self-styled Witchfinder General Matthew Hopkins. Rupert sets his eye on Isabel but she is not interested in him. She sees him as a waste of time. Rupert tries to force Isabel’s affection and her refusal makes him angry. Rupert, in an attempt to save face, uses his association with the Witchfinder name to accuse Isabel of being a witch. His father sides with him once he realizes the new Abbey will give him business. The charges are laid and Isabel is taken to the Abbey where she is held for trial. The trial is completely biased by Richard and the over-eager monks. Isabel is half-mad from isolation and the unfairness of it all. The verdict is given and the villagers who had formerly loved Isabel jeer as she is burned at the stake. The next year there is a plague spread by rabbits that decimates the Abbey and much of the village including Rupert. Richard lives to regret his son’s death as a result of his actions. The ghosts of Isabel and her rabbit are commonly seen around the Abbey to this day.
  2. Kosmicheskoye Tango is a collaboration between Adrian Earnshaw and Benedict Roff-Marsh. If you are a fan of Berlin School (Tangerine Dream, Michael Hoenig, Adelbert Von Deyen, etc.) then you will probably like this album. Adrian Earnshaw: composer, synths, Cubase10, videos Benedict Roff-Marsh: composer, synths, mixing, Reason 11 Benedict says: I have known Adrian for a while on & off over the internet for many years. I saw he was looking to work with others and his style is complementary to mine, so I reached out. We tried a track and a few days later “Memories of Cultures” was there. We both liked the experience and results enough to commit to a whole album. Adrian sent over the initial idea/s and I fleshed them out with more melodies, parts, etc. Once we both felt happy with the track, I mixed what we had which was usually a mixture of sounds from Adrian and myself. The album title comes from the track name which translated back from Russian to Cosmic Tango. It sounds more exotic in Russian. I made the cover once we had all the tracks and rather than doing the expected Berlin School thing of a spacey photo with titles, I decided to represent the meta-story of how the album was made. It was a “foreign correspondent” feel of Adrian & I sharing our stories through the mail – hence the Russian space stamps & grubby fingerprints.
  3. Kosmicheskoye Tango is a collaboration between Adrian Earnshaw and Benedict Roff-Marsh. If you are a fan of Berlin School (Tangerine Dream, Michael Hoenig, Adelbert Von Deyen, etc.) then you will probably like this album. Adrian Earnshaw: composer, synths, Cubase10, videos Benedict Roff-Marsh: composer, synths, mixing, Reason 11 Benedict says: I have known Adrian for a while on & off over the internet for many years. I saw he was looking to work with others and his style is complementary to mine, so I reached out. We tried a track and a few days later “Memories of Cultures” was there. We both liked the experience and results enough to commit to a whole album. Adrian sent over the initial idea/s and I fleshed them out with more melodies, parts, etc. Once we both felt happy with the track, I mixed what we had which was usually a mixture of sounds from Adrian and myself. The album title comes from the track name which translated back from Russian to Cosmic Tango. It sounds more exotic in Russian. I made the cover once we had all the tracks and rather than doing the expected Berlin School thing of a spacey photo with titles, I decided to represent the meta-story of how the album was made. It was a “foreign correspondent” feel of Adrian & I sharing our stories through the mail – hence the Russian space stamps & grubby fingerprints. View full album
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