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Ken Moore

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  1. This tape was released as a 46 minute cassette tape, making it the third in the Electronic Music Series for ACS. Some of the sounds were recorded at the electronic music studio at UMBC during Ken's stay there in 1973, using a mellotron, a Minimoog and an echo-flex tape machine. Other recordings included a spinet piano and wooden recorder. The second side of the tape was a compilation of recorded traffic sounds made in Baltimore around 1977, with sample-and-hold electronics added from an ARP Odyssey synthesizer. Later in 1983, this tape and EMS #2 (Tempus Fugit) were lifted from the catalog, and replaced with a title of "Inflectional Stimulus", making it a 90 minute cassette with the catalog number of AC13. Both tapes were released on Bandcamp in the second decade of the 2000's, and CD-Rs and newer cassette tapes were recorded for private listening, but physical media was not offered on Bandcamp. A bonus track was added in 2008 (4. "If Bowls Could Sing"), and included on the B/C release. A portion of side one of the cassette was added to Ken's Electronic Music Works LP on VOD Records in 2015, namely "Any Sense At All" (on side C of a 2LP set).
  2. Originally released in 1983 on the cassette from Anvil Creations, this album could be considered Ken's fourth "electronic music" work in his EM series beginning with Tempus Fugit, then To Come Into Being, and thirdly, Loubi Stem. Two (of 3) of the abstract organ works appeared on the 1999 release, "Extractions From My Convictions", the first of a collection of early sound works released on a compact disc for the first time (available from MDN a.k.a. Creative Musicians' Coalition in their AfterTouch magazine). These eight pieces (and one bonus track) have been re-mixed in 2014 for this special re-issue. Two works were recorded on a Synergy Polyphonic Digital Synthesizer, courtesy of Don Slepian, and the two shorts are experimental in nature. The title track compiled entirely on an ARP Odyssey synthesizer. The bonus track was played on a home-made harpsichord, with ARP synth added later. As a side note, the cassette was originally a split tape, with some tracks from TNA on side one, and a live performance from Rosenzweig & Moore appearing on side two. "In A Pound Of Logic" was initially designated as Electronic Music Series (EMS) #4, then replaced by To No Avail, with tracks from Don Slepian's Synergy added to make it a complete electronic music album by Ken Moore. (One more EMS, number 5, was issued in 1984 as "The Jupiter Effect".) Samples from all five EMS tapes were released on a double LP from VOD (Vinyl-On-Demand) Records in 2015.
  3. A chance meeting resulting from an ad placed at the community college in 1976, Brought Stuart and Ken together thanks to Mark Chance, who plays some bass guitar on a few of the tracks. The title track was recorded at Stuart's place, and the rest of the album comes from a recording session in Ken's apartment while living in historic Ellicott City. All tracks were live, and the tape was not released until 1981, when Ken began his mail order business as Anvil Creations. An ad was placed in Eurock magazine soon after "To Come Into Being" (AC06) was released. Ken also promoted "Our Own Universe" on the IEMA Tape #3, and there was a Pink 1 released later on the 5-Year Anniversary Tape a few years later. In 2015, Vinyl-On-Demand released an abridged version of Stuart & Ken's electronics and included the record in Ken's 5-LP box set. A picture of the retro-cassette cover is shown in the gallery below. Both Ken and Stuart played Moog synthesizers. Ken had an ARP String Ensemble, which he played through a phase shifter, and Stuart owned a mellotron, which can be heard on the title track. Stu also used an ARP Omni synth, and played violin, which can be heard on their second release, "Eccentric Projections". This was ground-breaking electronic music in 1976. While Ken was given the job of selling the group tapes for the IEMA (International Electronic Music Association), Stuart was founder of BEMN (Baltimore Electronic Music Network), and later often recorded with Ken Donnelly as Tangent.
  4. This was an experiment with the Moog synthesizer and a four channel open reel tape deck. Ken originally recorded this in 2004, and made it into a 2-CD set, but it was never sold or advertised until 2014 on his Bandcamp site. It is explained on the site as such: Originally intended to be a two disc set, each one continuous track of 80 minutes, and playable together as one 80 minute piece on two stereo sound systems for a surround sound effect. These CDs had to be edited into 4 separate pieces, two for each disc, in order to fit this format. Each pair can still be burned onto one disc and played together, but they also work as a continuous extra-long album of synthesizer drone works. This is the last recorded sounds from Ken's Moog muSonics minimoog unit before it was given over to capable hands for restoration. The synth was run through a four-channel tape deck, with the first channel recorded onto the second, the second onto the third, and the third onto the fourth. After that, the tracks were processed with a Lexicon effects module to give each disc a "characteristic" of its own. The gallery shows the original picture for the 2-CD package with tray card, and individual covers [plus tray card photographs] if it was packaged as two separate CDs. Also, the Bandcamp photo is different than all three of those.
  5. Minas Tirith is a fictional band created by Ken Moore to try and get airplay at local college radio stations. The names of the players were made up, and listed on the Bandcamp page as: Dave Michaels- keyboards; Ken Moore- all synthesizers; Mike Kent- drums; Brian David- tape effects & programming. The final song was recorded in 1983, using Runner's vocalist to assist with the lyrics. All other tracks were recorded between 1976-1979. Ken had written the music in 1972-1974, but had to learn how to play the drums before he could get good recordings of them in his small studio in north Baltimore. The cover of the CD was designed on a Windows-based computer, but a photograph by Mark Hollis (Hollishots) was used for the digital release on Bandcamp. Many of these songs did appear on a record included in the box set for Anvil Creations (Ken Moore Recordings 1973-1983) released in 2015 by Vinyl-On-Demand Records. Those songs include "Momentum", "Pendulum Clock", "Invitation", "Capillary Action" and "Two Egg". A booklet included with the CD was sent out and is included in the Photo Gallery below. The back cover of the CD shows Kenny Moore at the 1901 Kohler/Campbell upright piano that he had stripped down in 1973 when he acquired a Minimoog, Hammond organ, and an ARP String Ensemble for the studio in west Baltimore. After his time as Music Director for the IEMA in the early 1980s, Ken joined a progressive rock band called Kameleon, who later changed the name to Runner when they added a vocalist, Jimmy Lehman, who shared the lyrics with Ken on the song "My Unanswered Prayer". Wayne Myers and Ken left the band in 1985, and started recording their first album "Reaching Beyond The Sphere" in Ken's private studio, just the two of them. This album chronicles the time Ken spent recording alone.
  6. I listened to this recording all the way through. The description was a review in and of itself, and it made me want to hear what the results of their experiments were. As in all looper compositions, it started out slow, and gradually got more interesting as the time progressed. I could hear the resemblance to the mentioned Fripp and Eno sessions, and by the time it was over, it had me wanting to hear another one. This was a great project, and it comes at a time when SOMA Laboratories is developing a new looper device that will interact with the artist. Bravo
  7. As with his other recordings, Jack Hz has delivered an excellent sounding collage of real and found sounds. If you have four hours to listen to the complete works here, you will be rewarded with a satisfying escape into his unique world of sound design.
  8. Unfortunately, I was unable to access the album on Bandcamp. This recording may not be available t this time.
  9. After "Tempus Fugit" was released in 1980, ACS tried another electronic music recording and named it EMS #2, or "To Come Into Being. This tape was rejected by Eurock magazine, but picked up by Ken H.'s Aeon Distribution out of Colorado. This was Ken's sixth tape release by mail order. The cover, which was a hand-drawn copy of a photograph published in Omni magazine, was modified for the digital release on Bandcamp. The album used a lot of percussion sources, and the third track, "Reflections of the Light", was originally divided into two parts: a) The Light and b) Reflections. The opening track on side two, "Glass Shapes That Shatter in the Wind", was originally only 3:10 in length; this was extended to run 6:20 on the CD because so many people thought it should have been longer. Side two was taken up mostly by the lengthy piece, "Svit For 15 Oscillators", and was a cut-and-splice experiment, using the Minimoog with Ken's portable Lowrey organ plugged into it so that the filters could be used for those 12 oscillators. Add the 3 from the Moog, and you have 15 oscillators total. There were opposing opinions about the tape, but in general, Chris Furse's enthusiasm in passing it around to friends of Faceout, says that it was mostly favorable. To this day, TCIB remains Ken's most widely reviewed album, and sold the most copies on tape. Several of the reviews appear in this post's gallery below, including a letter that Ken himself wrote, explaining the recording process to a fan mail. The I.E.M.A, SYNEX, AEON, Surface Noise and Recordings [of experimental music] all helped to make Ken's music more widely recognized. Alex Douglas' CLEM (the Contact List of Electronic Music) also listed Anvil Creations in their publication.
  10. At the end of 2019, Allen Myers had offered a new synthesizer for sale, and Ken Moore was his first customer. The Short Story Synthesizer , an eight-voice device capable of generating Shepard-Risset glissandos, random sweeps and FM modulated chaos, was limited to eight units. Along with the tam-tams that Ken had already collected in the Gong Room, the Short Story provided the perfect electronic complement. Three of the pieces on VAST DIN are comprised of the Short Story Synthesizer played along with the tam-tams, and the other three pieces are SSS trio compositions. The sounds were fresh and unusual, so no other synthesizers were used on this recording. After VAST DIN, Ken went on to produce more albums using the Short Story, and the previous release, "Weather Ore Naught", was the first album to feature the Short Story in 2020.
  11. By this time, Dave Vosh and Ken Moore have been playing live performances for five years. This is Safe Creations' fifth release as a digital download, this time on Anvil Creations' Bandcamp site, so it was not offered for sale (only name-your-price). Ken felt that it was the duo's most ambient project to date, and having been reading about NASA's success story with the space probe Cassini, and its termination after exploring Saturn, he felt that the music on the album best suited the images that were sent back to Earth. Using a picture that Ken took, of an original painting hanging in the studio, a layout was designed for a special packaging using a DVD packaging case. Promo discs were sent out to several radio stations, one of which did give it airplay with a review, including it with "best albums of 2017". The technique for recording was the same as the previous releases. Dave would do his recordings with a modular synthesizer at his home near Washington D.C., and Ken would add his digital recordings of tam-tams from the Gong Room, located in Ohio. By blending these sounds together, their albums best simulate the live experience that they create when playing sessions at various Baltimore electronic music events. Safe Creations has been performing their unique style of electronic music since 2012, and most of their early recordings can be purchased on the MooreMyers b/c/ site.
  12. By this time, Dave Vosh and Ken Moore have been playing live performances for five years. This is Safe Creations' fifth release as a digital download, this time on Anvil Creations' Bandcamp site, so it was not offered for sale (only name-your-price). Ken felt that it was the duo's most ambient project to date, and having been reading about NASA's success story with the space probe Cassini, and its termination after exploring Saturn, he felt that the music on the album best suited the images that were sent back to Earth. Using a picture that Ken took, of an original painting hanging in the studio, a layout was designed for a special packaging using a DVD packaging case. Promo discs were sent out to several radio stations, one of which did give it airplay with a review, including it with "best albums of 2017". The technique for recording was the same as the previous releases. Dave would do his recordings with a modular synthesizer at his home near Washington D.C., and Ken would add his digital recordings of tam-tams from the Gong Room, located in Ohio. By blending these sounds together, their albums best simulate the live experience that they create when playing sessions at various Baltimore electronic music events. Safe Creations has been performing their unique style of electronic music since 2012, and most of their early recordings can be purchased on the MooreMyers b/c/ site. View full album
  13. As soon as the disc started playing, I knew this was going to be an awesome adventure in sound. Jack's execution of the sound designs are excellent, and everything is crystal clear. I really liked the slowed down pace of track 10, "Alone, The Piano Dreams Of Harmonics". There is some similarity connecting the first track with the last. Most every piece moves at a fast pace. This is something you can play over and over again. I am going to look for the MODULATOR album next!
  14. I watched this earlier. I remember when I first bought this video, I wasn't as impressed with the music as I thought I would be. It is an interesting visit with classic equipment, but I seem to remember a statement about there being some kind of 3D viewing possible with this movie. It didn't work on my TV, because I didn't have the color cables hooked up.
  15. Recorded in Seven Valleys, PA during Ken's visit to Baltimore for his first live performance in many years. Each piece was composed during the morning hours, one for each day of the week prior to his concert with Dave Vosh as Safe Creations that Sunday at An Die Musik. During the decade of 2003-2009, Ken had the opportunity to purchase a Moog Sonic Six synthesizer, fully restored. He had recorded some tracks on the Tascam 38, but those were not available by the time this album was done. However, Ken did sample some sounds before he was forced to sell the unit to a musician in Canada (due to financial stress) and these he had available on his Roland Edirol. Along with some recordings from the Gong Room, Ken was able to marry the recordings into a set of five compositions that are soft, yet introspective, with a laptop computer using Garageband. Deep listening is required to fully appreciate this release. Ken and Dave went on to make seven albums of their own using the name Safe Creations after this was released in 2012.
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