M.NOMIZED

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M.NOMIZED last won the day on December 6 2017

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About M.NOMIZED

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  • Birthday 09/02/1956

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    Melun (France)

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  1. Pierre Henry Birthday

    https://ifarmusiqueconcretecompilation.bandcamp.com/album/ifar-musique-concr-te-requiem-pour-pierre-henry-compilation
  2. Pierre Henry Birthday

    https://ifarmusiqueconcretecompilation.bandcamp.com/album/ifar-musique-concr-te-homage-pour-pierre-henry-compilation
  3. Robert Fripp Birthday

    Robert Fripp (born 16 May 1946) is an English guitarist, composer and record producer. As a guitarist for the progressive rock band King Crimson, Fripp has been the only member to have played in all of King Crimson's line-ups from their inception in the late 1960s to the present. He has also worked extensively as a studio musician, notably with singer David Bowie on the albums "Heroes" and Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps), Brian Eno, David Sylvian and contributed sounds to the Windows Vista operating system. His complete discography lists more than seven hundred releases over four decades. He is ranked 62nd on Rolling Stone magazine's 2011 list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time after having been ranked by David Fricke 42nd on its 2003 list. Tied with Andrés Segovia, he also is ranked 47th on Gibson's Top 50 guitarists of all time. His compositions often feature unusual time signatures, which have been influenced by classical and folk traditions. His innovations include Frippertronics, soundscapes, and new standard tuning. Read more - https://www.dgmlive.com/robert-fripp
  4. Second travel in a microscopic world...
  5. Recorded in November 1968 and February 1969 George’s Electronic Sound was released in May 1969, it was the second, and final, record released on The Beatles’ Apple Records subsidiary label, Zapple Records. It was yet more proof that George was ahead of his time and in many respects the most musically enquiring of the four Beatles. Electronic Sound is made up of two long pieces of music, originally one on each side of the LP, that are performed on the Moog synthesizer; the Moog IIIc modular system was purchased by George from its inventor, Robert Moog. The record was made against a background of musical exploration that characterised London and Los Angeles in 1968 …Avant-garde was everywhere. Side 2 of the album ‘No Time or Space’ was the first to be recorded and was done in Los Angeles in November 1968. George had finished work on The Beatles (White Album) and had flown to America’s West Coast to produce Jackie Lomax’s Apple album, Is This What You Want? at Sound Recorders Studio in Hollywood. Lomax’s album featured a Moog that had been brought to the studio by Bernie Krause, who along with musical partner, Paul Beaver, had recorded The Nonsuch Guide to Electronic Music, and was acting as something of a ‘salesman’ for Robert Moog’s invention. It was following work on the Lomax album that George, with Krause’s help, recorded the 25 minute piece. Side one of the LP is ‘Under the Mersey Wall’, an 18 minute piece that references the river on which Liverpool is built and it was recorded at Kinfauns, George’s home in Esher, Surrey, in February 1969. The title also refers to a weekly column in The Liverpool Echo, written by another George Harrison (no relation), entitled ‘Over the Mersey Wall’. In 1970 white noise from this track was used on ‘I Remember Jeep’, one of the jams included on All Things Must Pass. The album’s cover was a painting done by George and many years later his son Dhani asked his father if he could have the painting that was leaning against a wall, somewhat neglected, at home in Henley, to hang in his bedroom. A few years later George explained to Dhani what the painting was all about, “That’s Derek (Taylor) holding on to all of Apple’s aggravation and problems that are looming over everyone. That’s Neil (Aspinall) frowning and Mal (Evans) smiling with him in the chair. That’s Eric (Clapton) on the right there and the green guy on the front is Bernie (Krause), with his bow tie and pocket square, patching everything through the board. That’s me making the tea (small blue face smiling) and that’s the cat, Jostick, the small green demon like figure on the front cover.” The album and George’s Moog itself play an important part in The Beatles story as it was taken to Abbey Road studios in the summer of 1969 and used in the recording of The Beatles’ Abbey Road. As George later recalled, “The Moog synthesiser was enormous, with hundreds of jack plugs and two keyboards. But it was one thing having one, it was another thing making it work. When you listen to the sounds on songs like, ‘Here Comes The Sun’, it does some good things, but they’re all very kind of infant sounds.” Electronic Sound is a musical marker, one that George laid down during a period of intense inventiveness and in a world where everything and anything were possible.
  6. The sky you see is a visual illusion, it is not a solid discernible object like the surface of the earth Or the windscreen in your car. What we see as the sky especially during day time, is a combination of scattered light in the atmosphere and the clouds. To a lesser extent the horizon as well as dust, smoke etc contribute to the overall illusion of a large hemispheric dome over the surface of the earth. Clouds and the blue colour of the sky are both important aspects of our brain’s interpretation of what we call “Sky” If you take away the atmosphere and its contents including clouds, you have the vacuum of space reaching all the way up to the surface of earth, similar to the moons surface. As you ascend up through the atmospheric layers, the air becomes thinner and we soon leave the clouds behind and as the air becomes too thin to scatter light the blue gives in to black and we interpret that as beginning of space.
  7. M​.​NOMIZED - No Human's Land

    " In World War I, no man's land often ranged from several hundred yards to in some cases less than 10 yards. Heavily defended by machine guns, mortars, artillery and riflemen on both sides, it was often riddled with barbed wire and rudimentary improvised land mines, as well as corpses and wounded soldiers who were not able to make it across the sea of explosions and fire. The area was usually devastated by the warfare, carnage and remains of the artillery. It was open to fire from the opposing trenches and hard going generally slowed down any attempted advance. However, not only were soldiers forced to cross no man's land when advancing, and as the case might be when retreating, but after an attack the stretcher bearers would need to go out into it to bring in the wounded. No man's land remained a regular feature of the battlefield until near the end of World War I, when mechanized weapons (ie. tanks) made entrenched lines less of an obstacle. "
  8. Utopia Planitia is a large plain within Utopia, the largest recognized impact basin on Mars and in the Solar System with an estimated diameter of 3,300 km, and is the Martian region where the Viking 2 lander touched down and began exploring on September 3, 1976. It is located at the antipode of Argyre Planitia, centered at 46.7°N 117.5°E. It is in the Casius quadrangle, Amenthes quadrangle, and the Cebrenia quadrangle of Mars. Many rocks at Utopia Planitia appear perched, as if wind removed much of the soil at their bases. A hard surface crust is formed by solutions of minerals moving up through soil and evaporating at the surface. Some areas of the surface exhibit what is called "scalloped topography", a surface that seems to have been carved out by an ice cream scoop. This surface is thought to have formed by the degradation of an ice-rich permafrost. On November 22, 2016, NASA reported finding a large amount of underground ice in the Utopia Planitia region of Mars. The volume of water detected has been estimated to be equivalent to the volume of water in Lake Superior.
  9. An amoeba is a type of cell or organism which has the ability to alter its shape, primarily by extending and retracting pseudopods. Amoebas do not form a single taxonomic group; instead, they are found in every major lineage of eukaryotic organisms. Amoeboid cells occur not only among the protozoa, but also in fungi, algae, and animals. Microbiologists often use the terms "amoeboid" and "amoeba" interchangeably for any organism that exhibits amoeboid movement. In older classification systems, most amoebas were placed in the class or subphylum Sarcodina, a grouping of single-celled organisms that possess pseudopods or move by protoplasmic flow. However, molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that Sarcodina is not a monophyletic group whose members share common descent. Consequently, amoeboid organisms are no longer classified together in one group.
  10. M.NOMIZED - The City Of Lights

    After The Last City, a transition is necessary to the people. A new god is born. The city was rebuilt on its ashes. The time has come to go to a new city of light ...
  11. FRIPP & ENO - No Pussyfooting

    (No Pussyfooting) is the debut studio album by the British musicians Robert Fripp and Brian Eno (credited as Fripp & Eno). The album was released in 1973. (No Pussyfooting) was the first of three major collaborations between the musicians, growing out of Eno's early tape recording loop experiments and Fripp's "Frippertronics" electric guitar technique. Brian Eno invited Robert Fripp to his London home studio in September 1972. Eno was experimenting with a tape system developed by Terry Riley and Pauline Oliveros where two reel-to-reel tape recorders were set up side-by side. Sounds recorded on the first deck would be played back by the second deck, and then routed back into the first deck to create a long looping tape delay. Fripp played guitar over Eno's loops, while Eno selectively looped or recorded Fripp's guitar without looping it. The result is a dense, multi-layered piece of ambient music. This technique later came to be known as "Frippertronics". (No Pussyfooting) 's first track, which fills one side, is a 21-minute piece titled "The Heavenly Music Corporation". Fripp originally wanted the track titled "The Transcendental Music Corporation", which Eno didn't allow as he feared it would make people "think they were serious". It was recorded in two takes, first creating the background looping track, then adding an extended non-looped guitar solo over the backing track. This track features Fripp's electric guitar as the sole sound source. The second track "Swastika Girls", which fills the other side, was recorded almost a year after "The Heavenly Music Corporation" in August 1973 at Command Studios at 201 Piccadilly in London. The track employed the same technique as "The Heavenly Music Corporation" except Fripp played to a background electronic loop created by Eno on VCS3. Fripp and Eno took the tapes of "Swastika Girls" to British record producer George Martin's Air Studios at Oxford Circus to continue mixing and assembling the track there.[6] The track's title refers to an image of nude women performing a Nazi salute that was ripped from a discarded pornographic film magazine found by Eno at AIR studios. Eno stuck the image on the recording console while recording the track with Fripp and it became the title of the track. (No Pussyfooting) was released in November 1973 and failed to chart on either the American or British charts. It was met with negative reaction from the record label itself, Island Records, who were actively opposed to it. The album was released in the same year as Eno's more rock-based solo album Here Come the Warm Jets. Eno was attempting to launch a solo career, having just left Roxy Music, and his management bemoaned the confusion caused by the release of two albums with such different styles. Robert Fripp's bandmates in King Crimson also disliked the album. The mainstream rock press also did not pay the album much attention compared to Fripp's work with King Crimson and to Eno's solo album. In the UK, the album was released at a large discount compared to normal album prices and was regarded as something of a musical novelty.
  12. M​.​NOMIZED - The Last City

    THE LAST CITY A city almost like any other on the planet, if not the atmosphere that prevails ... And the laughter, children's games punctuate the course of days. Life is peaceful, pleasant. Between people and nature is a real communion. Nothing could change that fullness coming .... The horror abruptly degrades the exhilaration, all around, city after city the destruction becomes fruitful. Across the Invader took power, one word manages the world: ... Destruction! The sky is black ash on the ground run rivers of blood. What seems to be the remains of bodies scattered litter the earth ... This is the most total desolation ... Miraculously only one last city to resist such atrocities: "The last city ..." as people call him ... They are certain to be alone on this planet, they bind themselves to protect themselves. They have never been welded. But what will happen to them, them the last survivors? How to deal with this fear is no longer their air ... Do they still believe in a tomorrow? Despair becomes a force as if to say that we must believe whatever the cost. But doubt is powerful. Think, try to think they were spared ... as protected by someone or something intangible almost unreal ... Meanwhile, children play with simple stones, one says laughing ... Life is stronger ...! The adults look, meet ... we see as a breath to rise more and more dense in a complete meditation. They must believe in a future in them. Rebuild to move ... Yes, but differently. To stop living the horror. Unite in the true values. That of being for and with the Other. Everyone is aware of the new opportunity they have given them. The future becomes possible ... step by step, minute by minute, day after day the fly ash, dry blood, a new World is born ...! (Catherine Deschamps de Boishébert 2012)
  13. First travel in a microscopic world...