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Found 256 results

  1. The Nova Drone is an open source, analog experimental sound and light synth. It can be used to create effects ranging from slowly fading drones to chaotic harmonic sequences. It also functions as a complex visual pattern generator when combined with a digital/phone video camera. See the video link below for an example of the color patterns generated by holding a camera up to the LED. The NovaDrone offers 3 channels of sound and light. This is a DOUBLE PCB, which means has 6 channels. The Nova Drones offers 12 potentiometers, 10 switches, 6 oscillators, 9 oscillator sync inputs, 6 frequency modulation inputs and an epic 15 voltage outputs as well as 3 high current outputs for controlling external LEDs. All of the ins and outs have been routed to a prototyping breadboard at the bottom of the unit which allows for liberal experimentation and development of custom circuits. The prototyping area is especially useful for syncing the oscillators of 2 or more Nova Drones together. Each channel has the following features: ADJUSTABLE CONTROLS + volume + TONE pitch coarse tune 24Hz to 750Hz + TONE pitch fine tune + LFO rate .008 Hz (around 1 cycle every 2 minutes) to 750Hz SWITCHES + sync 1 + sync 2 INPUTS + ext sync 3 + PITCH modulation + LFO rate modulation OUTPUTS + TONE square wave + TONE triangle wave + LFO square wave + LFO triangle wave + PWM square wave + High current LED out for off board LEDs.
  2. Almark

    Edgewise

    A smooth flowing set of composed music, delicate and emotional. Composed using both electronic, violin and experimental techniques.
  3. The Woods is a single from the upcoming album Ruins by Alex Haas. Alex Haas (born 1963, NYC, USA,) label owner of Sonicontinuum, has been working with many renowned artists including U2, Brian Eno, Eric Clapton, Kronos Quartet, Pat Metheny and Bill Laswell. His first collaboration with Dutch composer Michel Banabila started in April on Collector, a track from Banabila's album Uprooted (Tapu Records / 2019). They then decided to renew their collaboration on The Woods, and Alex invited his long time collaborator, Bill Laswell to join this recording. The Woods became an atmospheric organic blend of experimental ambient, 4th world exotica and lush electronics. Synths and treated guitars by Alex Haas are mixed with Banabila's electronically processed voices, keys and field recordings, together with deep bass sounds by Laswell. Mixed and produced by Alex Haas. mastered by Marlon Wolterink.
  4. Since its beginnings Erica Synths has promoted experimental electronic music and has developed instruments that enable musicians to explore it. When it comes to standalone instruments, we think, one of most encouraging instruments in experimental music was Synthi AKS, so we teamed up with engineers from Riga Technical University to develop a synthesizer with a user interface inspired by Synthi AKS. SYNTRX [sintrex] is developed from scratch all analogue synthesizer (no part of schematics is cloned from Synthi AKS) with digitally controlled patch matrix. Unlike most of patch matrixes around, that mechanically connect signals, our 16x16 matrix utilizes 32 (!!!) 8 channel analogue switch ICs AS16M1 (made in Latvia, Alfa RPAR) and is a mixer/buffered multiple with 3 level attenuation (gain 1, 0,6 and 0,3) in connection points. It has 256 patch memory, automatic patch switching in performance mode or via MIDI messages. SYNTRX has 3 highly accurate VCOs that track great over 8 octaves, noise generator with “colour” filter, resonant VCF, ring modulator, spring reverb, looping envelope generator, joystick controller, input amplifier with adjustable gain for microphone to line level signals, 3 VCAs, output signal filter, analogue CV/audio signal level indicator and built in speakers. Extra features, not found on Synthi AKS, are Sample & Hold circuit with individual clock, octave switch for VCO1, synchronization of VCO2, AD mode on the envelope generator, as well as MIDI that accepts CV, Gate, Modulation wheel messages and program change messages for the matrix control. The SYNTRX comes in aluminium enclosure with ash tree side panels. We believe, it will inspire users to explore the space and travel to previously undiscovered audible realms.
  5. Erica Synths Pico System III is affordable, compact, yet powerful sounding, full analogue modular system.It comes in two formats – eurorack and desktop. Features + 2-3-4 step sequencer + 2x VCOs + VCO controller/VCA module + Several mixers that work both with CV and audio signals + Modulator (syncable LFO, random CV and noise source) + 2x voltage controlled ASR envelope generators + 2x resonant lowpass gates + BBD delay Pico System III brings modular synthesis back to the basics – the system has multi functional (instead of single-function, like Pico Drums or Pico Trigger in the Pico System II) analogue modules and is intended to encourage creativity in modular patching. The system has 31 inputs and 20 outputs (master output is duplicated) + 7 switches; if you have enough patch cables at your disposal, you can patch the system in 121000931215044250740178662400 or 1.21x1029 variations (we ignored the possibility to adjust potentiometers here). Even though only 0,0001% of all patches will sound more-less enjoyable, you and all your future generations can spend a lifetime only patching the Pico System III. Voice-cards with preset patches set it apart from other eurorack systems – they allow user to change patches instantly and radically, which makes the system well suited for experimental live performances. The system comes with 5 great sounding “factory preset” voice-cards, and 5 DIY voice-cards that are empty and users can develop their own patches. More voice-cards will be available from Erica Synths shop. Pico System III comes both as a desktop unit and a eurorack module. It features a set of modules for advanced sound design, experiments in modular patching and educational purposes. What do you get? Desktop unit20 patch cables, 1 Hosa stackable cable, PSU, 5 factory preset & 5 DIY voice-cards, user manual and patch note sheetsEurorack module 1 Hosa stackable cable, ribbon power cable, 5 factory preset & 5 DIY voice-cards, user manual and patch note sheets Technical specifications: Audio signal levels10VptpCV signal levels (full span)-5V - +5VSequencer CV output range0 - +5VVCO tune rangeC0 - E7LFO rate0.21Hz - 20HzVC EG attack time0...3''VC EG release time0...4.2''Max BBD delay time400msPanel width42 HPPower consumption 175mA@+12V, 112mA@-12V The Pico System III is a completely analog modular system with 13 Pico modules and preset memory. The good selection of modules allows a large number of patches and is ideal for learning analogue synthesis. The Pico System III is small and above all cheap, which makes it a modular synthesizer for everyone. -
  6. Silent Records, America’s premier ambient record label, is bringing their mystical brand of ambient and drone music back to Dunsmuir this October. Dronesmuir (a portmanteau of the words Dunsmuir and Drone) is the second of a series of music concerts planned by Silent Records for 2019. Drone music will be performed by three artists on the Silent label: Jack Hertz (San Francisco)—small hand-percussion and acoustic instruments processed via synthesizer Stuart McLeod (Portland)—hydrophone, brainwaves, waterphone & digital processing Mark Schlipper (Seattle)—guitar and effects. Jack Hertz promises to enthrall the audience with realtime processing via synthesizers of small handmade instruments. Stuart McLeod’s performance will make use of a hydrophone (underwater microphone) dropped into the underground rivulet below the restaurant. The hydrophone signal, combined with the waterphone will be processed digitally and controlled by the artist’s brainwaves. Mark Schlipper plays guitar in the Seattle drone-doom band The Luna Moth and will perform a solo guitar drone set. In addition, Jack Hertz will be speaking with music students at College of the Siskiyous at noon on Friday, October 18. The Wheelhouse will have food and beverages available for purchase, and Silent Records will have a merchandise table stocked with releases by these artists and many rarities from the Silent Records vault. Sound by China Cat Sound About the artists: Jack Hertz Inspired by the mystery of life, Jack Hertz manipulates sound to create intangible techno- oganic impressions between music and noise. Jack’s live performance will present a journey into the sonic middle ground between the real and the artificial utilizing instruments, found objects, field recordings, and real-time processing to create a sonic environment the audience can explore. Jack has been composing and recording music for more than 30 years. More on his work can be found at JackHertz.com Stuart McLeod Stuart McLeod has composed music for film, stage, and concert hall, for classical, improv, and rock groups. He has played with Gamelan Northwest and led the experimental group SIL2K. Stuart studied composition with Richard Karpen, William O. Smith and Kenneth Benshoof. Current investigations deal with composition vs. improvisation, conscious vs. unconscious will, and the concept of ‘self’. He’ll be performing a piece processing sounds from a hydrophone and waterphone with brain wave activity from an EEG headset controlling audio processing software. More information on his work can be found at stuartmcleod.bandcamp.com. Mark Schlipper Restless and prone to experimentation, Mark got his start playing music in the 80’s in Washington, DC, studying the avant garde in libraries and hardcore in garages. Moving to North Carolina in the early 90’s he began exploring the psychoactive effects of drone, repetition, and particular frequency ranges, sometimes in solo performances, sometimes in groups. In the late 90’s, he eventually brought his odd blend of genres and styles with him to the Pacific Northwest where his solo work has continued to evolve and shape-shift. “One of my bands released a new album, heavier and darker than previous releases, and it gained some attention, in part for my contribution on guitar, and the nature of the drone I was inclined toward. This led me to explore the element of drone more fully in my solo work—taking those things that were background or accent, and making them the focus. This new work tends toward a more ‘maximalist’ approach, with any lighter moments, as the accents, to help draw out the rest. Ideally creating a sound that is a physical presence in the room and in the head.” —Mark Schlipper The Wheelhouse 5841 Sacramento Ave, Dunsmuir, CA 96025 Telephone: (530) 678-3502 SILENT RECORDS Listen: silentrecords.bandcamp.com For more information contact: kim@silentrecords.us
  7. Cyber Folk: Digbee’s Electronic Chronicle gives a thorough look into a unique, highly personal approach to musical electronic instrument building, an approach that is many things: naïve, enthusiastic, sincere, alien, and familiar. This strange future/primitive work journal contains the release of tons of data, beautiful photos, schematics, building techniques, and the inside stories behind many of Digbee’s most beloved instruments. Also inside are artist features for Digbee’s favorite musical electronic practitioners. Within are never-before-published photos and stories of the work of Craig Anderton, Charles Cohen, Michael Johnsen, and Nautical Almanac’s Twig Harper and Carly Ptak. Peppered throughout the book are examples of connected imagery from comic books and science fiction illustration. This book was not written for a specific niche. Anyone with a curious mind and interest in musical electronics, experimental music, art, and craft will find a place of connection. An exclusive flexi-disk (phonograph record made of a thin, flexible vinyl sheet) is included in the back of the book. The disk includes a song made using all instruments featured in the book, and was specifically recorded for Cyber Folk. Cyber Folk: Digbee’s Electronic Chronicle is produced by Harpy Gallery and Selfish 60 Studio for the art exhibition entitled “New American Instruments” which will be up from July 20th to August 10th.
  8. Vector Synthesis: a Media Archaeological Investigation into Sound-Modulated Light is a computational art project inspired by theories of media archaeology, by the history of computer and video art, and by the use of discarded and obsolete technologies such as the Cathode Ray Tube monitor. This text explores the military and techno-scientific legacies at the birth of modern computing, and charts attempts by artists of the subsequent two decades to decouple these tools from their destructive origins. Using this history as a basis, I then describe a media archaeological, real time performance system using audio synthesis and vector graphics techniques to investigate direct relationships between sound and image using analog CRT displays. Key to this system is a didactic, open source approach which encourages reuse and modification by other artists. The conclusion of the book reflects on how the project and the research surrounding it has contributed to the larger experimental audiovisual arts community through events such as the Vector Hack Festival. Artists discussed include Mary Ellen Bute, Ben Laposky, Norman McLaren, Desmond Paul Henry, James Whitney, John Whitney Sr., Dan Sandin, Steina Vasulka, Woody Vasulka, Larry Cuba, Bill Etra, Mitchell Waite, Rosa Menkman, Cracked Ray Tube, Andrew Duff, Benton C. Bainbridge, Philip Baljeu, Jonas Bers, Robin Fox, Robert Henke, Ivan Marušić Klif, Jerobeam Fenderson, Hansi Raber, Ted Davis, Roland Lioni, Bernhard Rasinger, and the Kikimore group, among others.
  9. Random Radar Records was founded in Maryland, USA by Steven Feigenbaum to publish music by electronic, experimental, improvisation, and progressive artists, many of them were local bands around the Washington DC area.
  10. Acousmatique Recordings presents the "Pierre Schaeffer Birthday Compilation" project. We are asking artists to share their new or previously composed dedication to the French composer, writer, broadcaster, engineer, musicologist and acoustician. This project is open to all ideas. Interpretations, dedications, inspirations, and whatever you want to do that is some how musique concrète related. Everyone is welcome to participate. The is deadline to submit your track is August 13, 2019. One track per artist please, except for collaborations. The track should be original and cannot contain any Copyrighted material not owned by the artist. All tracks will be published under the artist's own Copyright. Files must be submitted in AIFF, FLACT, or WAV file format not to exceed 300 MB. Please, email your unpublished track along with the artist name, track title, artist site URL, country, and file download URL (no attachments) to s4grecs@gmail.com The "Pierre Schaeffer Birthday Compilation" album will be released on Pierre Schaeffer's birthday Monday August 14, 2019. About Pierre Schaeffer Pierre Henri Marie Schaeffer (August 14, 1910 – August, 19 1995) was a French composer, writer, broadcaster, engineer, musicologist and acoustician. His innovative work in both the sciences—particularly communications and acoustics—and the various arts of music, literature and radio presentation after the end of World War II, as well as his anti-nuclear activism and cultural criticism garnered him widespread recognition in his lifetime. Amongst the vast range of works and projects he undertook, Schaeffer is most widely and currently recognized for his accomplishments in electronic and experimental music, at the core of which stands his role as the chief developer of a unique and early form of avant-garde music known as musique concrète. The genre emerged in Europe from the utilization of new music technology developed in the post-war era, following the advance of electroacoustic and acousmatic music. Read more about Pierre Schaeffer here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Schaeffer
  11. Structured for use in university courses, the autor explaining the hystory electronic music and discusses the emergence of the early synthesizers and the subsequent evolution of more advanced technologies like digital áudio and the birth and development of the MIDI protocol. The Book include topics such as sound spatialization, computer music, algorith composition with Max/Msp, experimental music, electroacoustic music and a acousmatic composition methoded. The book Música Eletrônica is written in Portuguese.
  12. Voltage Research Laboratory Organic Modular Synthesizer Explore the Natural Systems and Lesser Known Fringes of Analog Synthesis An Organic Synthesizer by Pittsburgh Modular The Voltage Research Laboratory is a completely different analog synthesizer where every function of the instrument has been influenced by the behaviors and systems of the natural world. Wildly experimental and extremely deep, the Voltage Research Laboratory is a sonic playground created to explore the natural systems and lesser known fringes of analog synthesis. The Voltage Research Laboratory is 100% eurorack modular format compatible and is comprised of 3 separate eurorack modules housed together in a purpose-built, handmade eurorack enclosure. More than a collection of tools and functions, it is a unique modular synthesizer designed to reward deep experimentation and encourage the creation of unique sonic systems. Voltage Lab Synthesizer Voice Module The unique sound palette of the Lifeforms Voltage Lab originates with a complex oscillator pair that utilizes a wide range of shaping and manipulation options to move away from basic geometric shapes to more harmonically rich tones. A custom wave folder with enhanced waveform warping, linear FM, amplitude modulation, ring modulation, waveform cycling, hard sync, and more are available for extreme sonic research. Manipulation A set of multi-function generators work as interactive voltage processing systems to create and modify complex control voltages. The function generators act as voltage controllable envelopes, LFOs, slew generators, and more to produce evolving control signals. Voltage controllable parameters and multiple unison modes create complex and intertwined modulation systems through time. Interaction Twin dynamics controllers pull everything together. A unique circuit expanding on the classic low pass gate, the dynamics controller with variable response adds an organic depth to the sound of the Lifeforms Voltage Lab by simulating the natural behavior of sound. The multi-mode signal processor features a 12db resonant filter, VCA, and percussive low pass gate modes. Dimensional Sound interacts with the world around it. The Voltage Lab uses analog delay to simulate this interaction and create an artificial sense of time and space. Manipulation of delay time and feedback add depth and warmth through reverb, chorus, flanging, Doppler, slap back, and echo type effects. Unstable Systems Chaos is everywhere. Random gates and control voltages spark uncontrolled reactions, disrupt systems, and generate ideas. The Voltage Lab utilizes noise, stepped random CV, a pseudo-random sequence generator, pitched random CV, pitched random sequences, and random gates to add multiple levels of unpredictability to any patch. Interactive Touch Controller Module Intuitive and inspiring, the Lifeforms Touch Controller replaces the creative restrictions of a traditional chromatic keyboard with a set of fully configurable multi-dimensional touch pads. A duophonic touch controller that utilizes two sets of five touch pads to offer a flexible and interactive performance surface. Performances can be interpreted with a unique combination of monophonic and duophonic responses. The channel animator is available to quickly generate complex sequences or glitchy chaos. Intuitive and inspiring, the Lifeforms Touch Controller is the perfect launchpad for an experimental journey. Output Utility Module A Voltage Research Laboratory exclusive, the Utility module adds a few welcome features to round out the functionality of the instrument. A unity gain signal mixer / splitter along with stereo headphone and line outputs. Research Console Eurorack Case A beautiful 96hp eurorack enclosure designed with the warmth of walnut and the strength of steel. The Research Console eurorack format modular case pairs classic desktop synthesizer ergonomics with a modern eurorack form factor and clean, reliable power supply.
  13. "Plantasia" is a super rare and criminally neglected masterpiece of modern music that was made for plants. Literally. It's electronic music for plants to grow to. It was written by genius composer/arranger/instrumentalist/moog-master Mort Garson in the mid-70s under the moniker "Mother Earth". Most of Garson's releases during this period are difficult to get your hands on. Given Mort Garson's use of weird pseudonyms, strange subject matter, and the utilization of smaller, independent pressing plants, many of his original records cost a pretty penny. But "Plantasia" is different. Due to a bizarre (and possibly very dumb?) promotion which paired the record as a giveaway if you bought a Simmons mattress in 1976, authentic copies often remain hidden away on thrift store racks, garage sale driveways, or dusty attics. Because of how difficult it is to find this record, the resale market on mint condition copies is astoundingly high. Buying a clean copy of "Plantasia" at a record store could easily cost upwards of $300 USD. In Finding Plantasia, Tim and Morgan hit the road to search for this forgotten musical treasure in its natural habitat. In this documentary film, Tim and Morgan will be speaking to fans of this record and digging through the stuff society has discarded in search of a true gem. The road trip story provides a great framework to get into the nitty-gritty history of "Plantasia" and the niche culture that has sprung up around it. But, much like tiny baby seeds need water, Tim and Morgan need your help! About Tim and Morgan Tim Mahoney and Morgan Evans are real-life best friends and writer/producer/director/comedy people. Between the two of them, they've worked for companies like MTV, Netflix, The Onion, Nickelodeon, YouTube Premium, Comedy Central, VH1, Discovery Channel, and many more. They're also deep music nerds. Before they started working in entertainment, Tim & Morgan were big into the local Phoenix, Arizona music scenes, performing in experimental performance art projects and punk bands as early as 15 years-old. That was around when they both became obsessed with "Plantasia." More About Mort Garson Starting off as songwriter/arranger, Garson worked with artists like Bobby Darin, Santo and Johnny, Dorris Day, Cher, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Bobby Vee, Ruby and the Romantics, Jimmie Rodgers, Carol Burnett, Joanie Summers, the list goes on and on, crossing genres left and right. Near the end of the 60's, Garson was one of the first composers to begin working with the new Big Moog synthesizer. And the rest is history. As early as 1968, Mort started to release interesting and strange electronic music under pseudonyms. 1968: "Wozard of Iz," a bizarre electronic re-telling of the Wizard of Oz released under The Electronic Odyssey. 1969: he released Electronic Hair Pieces, an electronic version of the hit musical HAIR. 1971: under the name Lucifer, Garson released an experimental electronic record called "Black Mass." 1971, under the name Z, "Music For Sensuous Lovers." 1975, under the name Ataraxia, "The Unexplained (Electronic Musical Impressions Of The Occult)." 1976 he released "Plantasia" under the name Mother Earth. 1978, under the name Captain D.J., he released a a spacey funk record called "Disco UFO"
  14. The C15 is a keyboard instrument made for performing musicians. Its character stems from a puristic digital engine which produces a unique palette of sounds seamlessly spanning from organic and acoustic to experimental and electronic. With its top-quality keybed, dual full-length ribbons, special pitch bender, and four pedal connections the C15 is designed for real-time performance, making it more like a traditional musical instrument than a typical synthesizer. It is resolutely an instrument to be played by musicians, not machines. Therefore it has no MIDI and does not contain LFOs or internal sequencers. Like many classical instrument builders, we have chosen wood for most of the housing. The rest is made of steel or aluminium. The concept features a two-part design. The compact base unit is for playing and includes all performance elements as well as the sound engine and audio components. It can be easily detached from the panel unit and played autonomously. The panel unit is for detailed parameter control and sound design. Its haptic layout is based on the principle of muscle memory. In addition, a graphical user interface can be displayed and edited on any device that has a browser and Wi-Fi. This interface is optimized for touch screens and can be intuitively zoomed and panned with common gestures. Two-Part Construction The housing of the C15 synthesizer consists of two detachable parts: the base unit and the panel unit. The compact base unit contains all of the instrument's processor and audio components; it can be used without the panel unit in "play only" situations. The panel unit is an haptic user interface, mainly for sound design, but it can also be useful to control a more complex performance. Play Interface For the 61-note keyboard we have chosen the best semi-weighted model from the quality manufacturer Fatar. Experienced musicians will appreciate the long key arms for their improved play feeling. Unlike with MIDI, the velocities of the keys and the values of the other physical control elements are precisely resolved into thousands of steps, and there is no loss of precision on the way to the sound engine. The musician can make use of up to 8 physical controls: aftertouch, a pitchbend lever, two ribbons and up to four pedals. A coefficient matrix gives full flexibility for their mapping to the Macro Controls. The pitchbend lever is a special design using magnetic forces for fast and natural horizontal movements from a center position. The most prominent control elements of the C15 are the two long ribbons. Each of them includes an indicator bar of 33 LEDs showing the control position. The ribbons can be used for performance as well as for parameter editing. You can choose if they work in relative or absolute mode, with an optional return-to-center behavior. A small control panel with an OLED display (128 x 32 dots) provides control over the ribbon functions and is also used for note and octave shift. If the panel unit is not mounted, this panel together with the ribbons will give access to preset selection and morphing, parameter editing and global settings like tune or velocity curves. Pedals are the best way to control sound parameters while playing with both hands. Therefore the C15 allows up to 4 pedals to be connected. Footswitches are also supported, but for expressive playing we recommend continous damper/sustain pedals instead of switches - for this purpose we are also developing special pedal units. Sound Editing Panels The idea behind the panel unit is to provide a large area with many haptical controls, so that the functionality can be learned by the motoric memory, like the playing of a keyboard. Panel Interface Four of the five panels are equipped with 24 high-quality buttons and corresponding state-indicating LEDs. Their main purpose is the selection of parameters. The labeling and grouping of the buttons is realized by exchangable magnetic overlays. This makes the user interface flexible. When fast switching between sounds becomes crucial the selection panels can be re-defined as direct access to presets. Future development will also bring new synth engines to which the user interface can be adapted. The central panel - with a crisp OLED display (256 x 64 dots), an incremental encoder, and 18 buttons with dedicated functions - is the place where parameter values are displayed and edited, preset banks can be browsed and new presets can be stored. Many other functions are accessible here. The Graphical User Interface In addition to its hardware user interface, the C15 provides a visual access to its parameters and presets on computer screens and mobile devices. This unique approach is described here. The Synthesis Engine The C15 is a polyphonic instrument based on digital sound synthesis. The purpose of the audio engine is not to model analog machines of the past or to play back samples or complex waveforms. Instead, we have chosen a puristic approach. Based on elementary mathematic algorithms, the signals are generated, modulated, shaped, and filtered in realtime. Therefore the sound can be dramatically influenced by the dynamic playing of a musician. The signal processing structure is the result of years of evolution and has been condensed down to an essential, yet powerful arrangement of carefully chosen components. The only signal sources are two sine wave oscillators. They are connected to each other and to a feedback bus for phase modulation and their signals are processed by two wave-shapers, a comb filter, a multi-mode filter, and a chain of five stereo effects. Diagram Block diagram of the synthesis engine. Click to enlarge and to see use cases. Two mixers combine the signals from different points in the structure and forward their sum to the effects section and to the feedback bus. The sonic results of the feedback can become very complex and organic. With the Comb Filter running as a tuned resonator, the sound approaches that of acoustic instruments. Our goal was not to create a universal sound engine or the most realistic imitation of existing instruments. Instead, we set out to create a sound source with a unique character, which at the same time offers endless variation and produces surprising results even after long periods of intensive exploration. All possible sounds are reached without switching between different waveforms, filter types, effects, or signal path configurations. Everything can be continuously modulated, crossfaded, or morphed. Read more about the engine on the Synth Engine page. Open for New Sound Engines The C15's sound engine is based on software running on an embedded computer. This means that the C15 can evolve without falling into obsolescence. Improved and new sound engines will be available in future. This also explains why we have chosen a generic parameter selection interface that can be re-defined by magnetic overlays. Control As a pure player instrument, the C15 is built for human control. You will not find modulation sources that create rhythmic patterns. We leave this to the musician. Instead, the C15 offers a large range of sensitivity thanks to the dynamics of the keys and extensive mapping possibilities for the signals coming from the two ribbons, the bender, the aftertouch and the up to four pedals. LFO-type of control signals can be easily produced by the specially designed lever of the bender. The physical controls are routed to the Macro Controls, which are the main elements for influencing the sound of a preset. Each of them is freely assignable to up to 86 target parameters. The Macro Controls are the sources for an intuitive modulation system, where the effect of a modulation is directly shown as a movement of the target parameter. After assigning a Macro Control and adjusting its effect the sound designer also can give it a label that helps to understand its function. The Preset System Besides performance, the second important interaction with the C15 is sound design. The creations are stored by an advanced preset system which makes it easy to find and compare presets, to modify them, and to store new versions. They can be organized in a set of user-defined banks by intuitive copy, move and sort functions. The number of banks and presets per bank is not limited. To help the user to find the right sounds, the preset system supports tagging and additional information that can be used for searching. In a future update the C15 will also offer voice splitting and layering for two presets, and morphing as a powerful method to vary the sound in a transition between two presets. Undo The C15 provides virtually unlimited tree-based undo/redo functionality for all user interactions including parameter editing. This means you can always return to a sound that you had created some minutes ago. You can also jump between different branches of the undo tree which are automatically created when you undo and edit again.
  15. Grenoble-based music technology pioneers Arturia are breaking the mold yet again with the release of their first ever digital hardware synthesizer. New for NAMM 2019, MicroFreak is a bold, adventurous instrument that will both inspire newcomers with its ease of use and great sound, and also excite experienced players with its unusual, quirky features. Combining the best of both worlds, MicroFreak includes a multi-mode digital oscillator with an Oberheim SEM-inspired analog filter. 7 of the oscillator modes are the result of a collaboration between Arturia and Eurorack legends Mutable Instruments, and let users control the sound of the iconic Plaits module in the comfort of an all-in-one hardware synth. The modes include Superwave, Harmonic Oscillator, Karplus-Strong, Wavetable, Virtual Analog, Waveshaper, FM, Grain, Chords, Speech, and Modal. One of the most striking features of MicroFreak is its innovative PCB keyboard. Despite having no moving parts, it’s pressure sensitive and lightning-fast, and also offers poly-aftertouch. This unique functionality will also let you experiment with polyphonic express-enabled software instruments when MicroFreak is used as a USB-MIDI controller. On top of its exceptional oscillators, filter, and interface, MicroFreak offers some seriously advanced features that other low-cost instruments can only dream of. A multi-point modulation matrix; an unique sequencer-arpeggiator with controlled randomness “Spice” and “Dice” parameters; a cycling envelope; 128 factory presets, and space for 64 user sounds; and a crystal-clear OLED screen MicroFreak will contain 11 oscillator types at launch, but Arturia have made the unit capable of using new oscillators through official firmware updates in the future. At $349 / 299€, MicroFreak is both a superb contender for “my first synth”, as well as an intriguing 2nd, 3rd, or 15th synth for the collector or experimental sound designer. MicroFreak is currently in production, and is expected to arrive at retailers worldwide from April 1st, 2019. Arturia promise MicroFreak isn’t an April Fool’s joke. Official Product Information An affordable digital hardware synth with unusual oscillator modes, an analog filter, “Spice and Dice” sequencer, and a unique PCB keyboard. Featuring an exciting collaboration with Eurorack legends Mutable Instruments, MicroFreak offers many of the Plaits oscillators with added paraphony, and lets users explore and save presets, and experiment with a modulation matrix. This is a budget synth like no other. Whether you’re looking for your first, affordable hardware synth or are collector looking for original sounds and unique interface, MicroFreak is the synth you need. This out-there little music machine features a versatile digital oscillator so you can create rare and interesting sounds with ease. Modes like Texturer, KarplusStrong, Harmonic OSC, and Superwave give adventurous musicians the chance to explore totally new, unheard possibilities. Like having dozens of synths in just one instrument, both wild-eyed newcomers and seasoned professionals will fall in love with MicroFreak’s flexible, powerful synth engine. MicroFreak packs so much in to such a compact instrument, you'll wonder how we did it. We'd love to say it was magic, but it was pure skill and passion. Physical modelling, wavetable synthesis, virtual analog, there is nothing as complete and exciting as the MicroFreak oscillator on the market. It's hard to believe from such a small synth, but here it is, ready for you to explore. Excite your creativity and reward your curiosity with a large, diverse sound palette. MicroFreak features 13 awesome oscillators, 5 bespoke Arturia engines, and 8 modes from our partners at Mutable Instruments. Even though MicroFreak has a digital oscillator at its heart, “opposites attract” as the saying goes. That’s why we’ve included a lush-sounding analog filter. Inspired by the trailblazing 12-dB Oberheim SEM filter, you can make MicroFreak’s filter scream or whisper to taste. The filter is state-variable, and can even auto-oscillate! You can use this is any way you like, from taking the edge of the razor-sharp wavetable sounds, or automating the cutoff by modulating it with keyboard pressure or the in-built sequencer. Wait. Did we mention that MicroFreak has a sequencer? And a mod matrix? Things are about to get seriously interesting... MicroFreak is packed with unique, exciting features that let you create music with a fresh perspective. Record up to four automations, edit notes per step or use the innovative Spice and Dice sequencer functions to find happy accidents. Add randomization to create evolving, original patterns, and virtually rewire and reconfigure its signal chain and controls with the 5x7 modulation matrix. That’s right, it is. It isn’t really even a keyboard. It’s a PCB. Super-flat, with no moving parts. Will it track lightning-fast synth solos? You bet. Better than a traditional keyboard, actually. Will it let you be expressive? Of course, it’s not only pressure sensitive, but also offers poly-aftertouch. This means each key can control parameters in a different way depending on how much you touch. You can also use its USB, MIDI, and CV outputs to control instruments in your DAW and modular synths. This also means that you can also use MicroFreak as a controller to experience polyphonic aftertouch with cutting edge software instruments.
  16. KORG volca modular is a semi-modular analog synthesizer in the KORG volca format that makes modular synthesis more accessible and understandable than ever before. Featuring 50 patch points for using the 20 included patch cables to connect the eight onboard modules in any way imaginable, volca modular was created with “West Coast Style” synthesis in mind, to offer a unique sound and design that deviates from traditional synthesis norms. A semi-modular analog synthesizer that makes modular synthesis more accessible and understandable than ever before. Creating new sounds that don’t exist in the outside world is an unending dream which has continued since the birth of electronic musical instruments. This dream has evolved and expanded throughout the development of new and unique music production devices. The popularity of modular synthesizers around the world has generated new excitement and interest in the so-called "West Coast style" of synthesis that deviates from traditional synthesis norms. The compact body of this volca synth features eight modules and 50 patch points. While learning the basics of a modular synth, you can use popular features of the volca synthesizer line to control a unique and different flavor of analog sounds. An Analog Synth Composed of Eight modules The volca modular is a semi-modular synthesizer consisting of independent analog synth modules, digital effects, and a sequencer. Each of the modules has been carefully selected for its stand-alone completeness. The modules are internally connected so that sound can be produced even before connecting the included pin cables, and the routing is shown by white lines on the panel. Module connections via a pin cable take priority over the internal connections, bypassing them. SOURCE: This consists of a triangle VCO carrier and a modulator. The complex overtones generated by FM modulation are sent through a wave folder circuit to add additional overtones, producing a distinctive sound. This module is important in determining the basic character of the sound of volca modular. FUNCTIONS: This section consists of two function (envelope) generators. In addition to an ADH generator with attack, hold, and release, there's a Rise-Fall generator, also known as a slope generator, which not only applies time-varying change to the sound but also lets you patch the end trigger out back into the trigger in as a loop, making it usable as a VCO or LFO. WOGGLE: This is a random signal generator containing a sample & hold circuit that uses pink noise as its source. Two outputs are provided, allowing it to output either stepped or smooth random noise. SPLIT: This module distributes one input to two outputs. It can also be used in the reverse direction, combining two control or audio signals into one. DUAL LPG: This consists of two low-pass gate circuits. Typical of the West Coast style of synthesis, the module packages a filter with an amp, allowing the brightness and volume of the sound to vary together. UTILITY: This is a mixing scaling module that combines two signals in various ways. It can mix not only audio signals but also control signals, as well as inverting or attenuating those signals. SPACE OUT: This is a stereo module that applies a reverb-like effect to the audio signal. SEQUENCES: This module is for connecting to the internal sequencer. You can set the tempo, and select different rhythm divisions to output via the gate counter. Analog synthesizers in which a simple oscillator such as a saw wave or square wave is modified by a filter are referred to as "East Coast style" because of their origin from well-known American manufacturers. Synths of this style, as exemplified by the MS-20, have continued to evolve toward a goal of being used in many mainstream musical genres, thus being equipped with a keyboard for performance. Their sounds are notable for sharp filters and rich presence, and can be heard in many well-known songs. Synthesizers of the "West Coast style" evolved in a uniquely different direction from such musical developments. Pursuing the freedom that is inherent to electronic musical instruments, these were based on oscillators such as FM modulation which generated numerous overtones, and used random and complex control signals and low-pass gate circuits to vary tonal character and volume, so that slight movement of a knob might dramatically transform the sound. While their potential was acknowledged, the resulting sound and its changes were difficult to predict, causing these synths to be used in a more experimental capacity. For these reasons, hardware products of this style have been few in number. However, recent years have seen the popularity of modular synths such as Eurorack, as well as DAW plugin instruments that resurrect classic bygone synths of the past. This world-wide movement toward embracing interesting sounds has received renewed attention, spurring a new look at the sounds of this style. Starting from analog, and freely taking in all elements including FM and PCM, the volca series has also focused on this trend. And now, this distinctive "West Coast style" sound has been added to the KORG volca series. Patching allows infinite possibilities Volca modular’s modules are connected via the included pin cables, allowing a diverse range of combinations. The unit's compact chassis provides 50 patch points. Inputs and outputs are color-coded for recognition at a glance, and the signals are also marked by symbols to indicate audio, control, gate or trigger. Normally, each signal is connected according to its use, but on the volca modular, signal levels are universally compatible between modules, allowing hidden possibilities to arise from patching that defies common sense. Twenty pin cables are included, and also included is a reference sheet explaining each patch point and providing basic examples of patching. Volca sequencer elevates experimental sounds into music with a sixteen-step sequencer that can automate parameters While the volca modular is a semi-modular synth, it is equipped with a full-fledged 16-step sequencer providing a wide range of functions, letting you enjoy automatic performance even when used stand-alone. Using the 16 buttons familiar from the volca series, you can perform step input or use the buttons as a keyboard for realtime recording. The pattern chaining function plays back multiple sequence patterns in succession, allowing you to connect up to 16 sequences with up to 32, 64, or even 256 steps to create large-scale development. The motion sequence function records knob movements, letting you add time-varying change to the sound. You can create loops, or use this function live for strikingly original performances. Up to 16 sequence patterns and sounds can be saved in the unit. Also provided is an active step function which lets you play back while skipping the steps you specify. You can skip the latter half to produce a short loop, use an alternate time signature to create polyrhythms, and evolve sequence patterns in real time to create a dynamic performance. Randomize function that can generate accidental ideas The sequencer of the volca modular lets you specify randomization for notes, active steps, and micro tuning. Irregular phrases, rhythms, and scaling that would be unlikely to come to mind can be generated by applying randomness, letting the volca be a source of unknown ideas. Two new modes added for sequence playback Two new sequence modes have been added: bounce sequence mode which makes a round trip through the steps, and stochastic sequence mode which gradually proceeds while randomly moving forward and backward. Playing back a recorded sequence in a different form can add dramatic changes to your song or performance. Musically advanced scales, keys, and micro tuning Although the volca modular is a West Coast style synthesizer, it also provides flexible support for music as a contemporary instrument. You can choose from 14 types of scale including equal temperament. Since you can also specify the tonic key from which these scales start, you can play these scales in any key. There's also a micro tuning function that lets you individually specify the pitch of each note. You can pursue your own unique music by performing in an original tuning with the pitch of individual notes raised or lowered. Excellent playability Connectors that allow synchronized performance and external control With a sync jack that allows easy connection to a Korg groove machine, you can connect the volca modular to another volca series unit, a minilogue, monologue, or prologue, an electribe, or the SQ-1, and enjoy sessions with the sequencer synchronized to the playback. The CV IN jack for external control is a TRS mini stereo jack that lets you input two signals. The left channel can input a ±5V signal and the right channel can input a signal of 1V/oct (0–+6V) signal which is internally converted to pitch CV within the volca modular. Of course, each of these two signals can also be patched to control a module. Enjoy anywhere Compact, size, battery operation, and built-in speaker mean that you can take this unit anywhere and enjoy playing at any time.
  17. Three dark-ambient stories made with concrete sounds, field recordings, noise, and abstract electronic. Recorded in 2013 at Studio du Coin Cornu, Cœur de Beauce, France. Photo by Ironside. Sleeve design by Graph'Hypnotic. [ abstract electronic, neo-concrete, dark ambient, electroacoustic, experimental, field recordings, noise, drone, sound art ]
  18. The third album of Elemental Noise leads us in the intangible world of particles. Strange ethereal pads, delicate cascades of notes, hypnotic waves, live interlaced sequences and a real Orchestra shape the ambient matter towards a sonic alchemy. Elemental Noise shows again his mastership in sound design and his ability to blend orchestral parts with experimental electronic music. Recorded and mixed in 1999-2000, Paris, France. Basic tracks recorded at Flipper The Dog Studio. Orchestral parts on track 4 recorded at Intercontinental Studio. Track 9 recorded live during the total eclipse of the sun, the 11 of August 1999. [ experimental, abstract, ambient, improvised electronic, orchestral, synth music ]
  19. Recorded and mixed between Dec. 2005 and June 2006 at Flipper The Dog Studio, Paris, Fance. This release mastered in 2011 at Scoz Mastering Suite, Cœur de Beauce, France. Image Lockheed Martin (Nooa & Nasa public domain). Sleeve Design by Graph'Hypnotic. [ electronic, electronica, house, progressive trance, techno, electro ambient, experimental electronic , psychedelia, sound collages ] View full album
  20. Recorded and mixed between Dec. 2005 and June 2006 at Flipper The Dog Studio, Paris, Fance. This release mastered in 2011 at Scoz Mastering Suite, Cœur de Beauce, France. Image Lockheed Martin (Nooa & Nasa public domain). Sleeve Design by Graph'Hypnotic. [ electronic, electronica, house, progressive trance, techno, electro ambient, experimental electronic , psychedelia, sound collages ]
  21. The idea of making an album in an "old school electronic" spirit with only one venerable EMS VCS3 had been tempting me for years. But I wanted to push the concept further by rebuilding a 70's home-studio, deliberately limiting the technical possibilities. If I easily found the VCS3 and the tape recorders, borrowed from "old" friends, the effects I wanted were harder to find. After a few weeks of searches, a London collector, friend of an "old" friend, sent me the machines I was looking for. It was a real pleasure to do "The Zinovieff Synthdrome", with the strong impression of a "return to the past"... Album recorded in June and July 2018 at Studio du Coin Cornu, Ville des Carnutes, France. Digital transfer and mastering at Scoz, Cœur de Beauce, France. Photos and photo-montages by Ironside. Sleeve design by Graph'Hypnotic. Many thanks to David (VCS3 + KS), Alan (FX devices), Dieter (Teac devices), and Thomas (Revox). The 70's home-studio : - 1972 EMS KS keyboard - 1973 EMS VCS3 Mk2 - 1972 Quad-Eight RV10 spring reverb - 1974 Wem Watkins Copicat tape echo - 1972 Teac A-3340 4 tracks recorder - 1974 Teac Model 2 6-2 mixer - 1971 Revox A77 Mk2 2 tracks recorder. [ berlin school electronic, ambient, drones, experimental, old school electronic, synth music ]
  22. Daphne Oram was educated at Sherborne School for Girls, and then, during the war, she joined the BBC in London as a Music Balancer. There she worked with most of the well known international musicians in the fields of chamber music and opera. But, alongside this work, she was intrigued by the possibilities of manipulating magnetic tape sound, and as early as 1948 began to build special equipment for experiments. She was the first to compose an electronic sound track for a BBC television play (Amphitryon 38), all the composing being done in the middle of the night (using quickly assembled equipment) in the deserted Broadcasting House studios. When the BBC eventually built an experimental studio, the Radiophonic Workshop, Daphne Oram helped to design it and then directed it. In 1959. she decided to leave the BBC to create her own studio in her converted nasthouse at Wrotham, Kent. Since then, she has become internationally known for her work in films, television, theater and radio; she has presented successful concerts of electronic compositions at the Mermaid Theatre. London, and at the Edinburgh International Festival. She has lectured widely - at London University, Cambridge University Arts Society, The Institute of Physics, Harrow School, Wellington College, Roedean, and at many other Colleges, Schools and Music Festivals. She has also appeared a number of times on television and in films. For her Oramics research work, at her Kent studio, she received two Gulbenkian Foundation Grants
  23. My first major work of electronic music was from 1976. This was composed using a large Moog Series III synthesizer and two 4-channel tape recorders. For several years, up to 1981, my work in electronic music used this setup or a similar system often augmented by the ARP 2600 or Synthi AKS and other tools found at the various studios in which I was working. This particular early composition objet d’art is a long-form work, more than an hour in duration and in five large sections or movements. The original recording still exists, but it has not yet been restored and is not commercially available. Since that time, I have often returned to the long-form conception for music of this type – modernist, experimental electronic music. The obvious parallel is instrumental symphonic music - music of large-scale extension, depth and development. Originally, my inspirations were drawn from progressive rock – Thick as Brick, Close to the Edge, Supper’s Ready – and distinctly the work of numerous modern electronic groups and composers (such as Tangerine Dream and Morton Subotnick) who have often worked with forms of symphonic proportions. An earlier work of this type is The Strong Eye, composed and recorded in 1991 at the studios of the Danish Institute of Electroacoustic Music. This earlier recording, a suite of nine movements, combines the transformation of acoustic sounds (instrumental performances of flute, piano, ‘cello, percussion, and vocal sounds) with environmental sounds and purely synthetic sounds created in various ways including frequency modulation, and analysis-based additive synthesis and physical modeling. The blending of the acoustic and the synthetic – the real and the imaginary – has been a guiding idea of a number of my works of this type. Numerous other long-form works are available on recordings including Solace (2012), De-Re-Construction (2015), Paradise Garden of Shiramizu Amidado (2015), Grey Blanket Drops and the World Reduced to Arm’s Length (2014), Precession (2014) and Parasympathetic Music (2013) among others. Phonotopological is comprised of 13 large sections created from 125 complex sub-elements. Each one of these sub-elements, themselves created from a number of individual sound sources, is used only once in the work. Relatively continuous in sound, the composition has a clear formal design of contrast and internal development. From a technical point of view, the work could best be described as acousmatic. Sound elements are often obscured from their acoustic origins due to significant transformational processing and re-contextualization. All of the sound sources are originally acoustic, and some of these sources are elaborated with resonance filtering techniques that imbue them with an electronic sonic tinting. While the work is created in stereo, many of the elements are spatialized on both moving sound paths and in static positions using ambisonic techniques. Tools used include Metasynth, Csound, Trajectory, Sound Particles, and Spat Revolution, among others.
  24. Erica Synths Liquid Sky Dada Noise System is an experimental sound-lab for Musique Concrete / ambient noise / abstract sounds and sound design. Created in cooperation with the liquid sky artistcollective Berlin & Portugal. Great for processing field recordings, pads, experimental vocals, extra terrestrial atmospheres and for generating mad noise patterns and pads. Features Black Octasource Pico VCO 2 Black Code Sources Code Source Expander Black Modulator Multimode VCF Black Dual EG/LFO Black Quad VCA Pico Drums Black Joystick Fusion Ringmodulator Black Mixer Mixer/Splitter Fusion Delay Black Hole DSP + expansion ROM Black Output Module 2x84HP skiff case with integr. PSU 20 patch cables
  25. With Shadow Aesthetics, Marc Barreca accomplishes something rare in electronic and ambient musics. The fluid, dynamic changes and movement within pieces; the complexities in time and pitch variation and evolution—typically absent from the mostly homogenous constructs of drone and ambient—all bring previously unavailable depth, shading and emotional charges to a form usually admired for its neutrality. Shadow Aesthetics results from a virtual arsenal of digital and analog sources operating in a complex system of origination, structuring, processing and editing. The result is a moving, articulate and complex work: music that is a profoundly emotive, original, and experimental electronic work that is in many ways the culmination of decades of listening, performing and composing in a form known best for continuous change.The album includes an eight-page booklet and a digital download code for the complete album plus two bonus tracks. Marc Barreca has been creating and performing electronic music since the mid-1970s. His 1980 album, Twilight, reissued on vinyl last year, was one of the earliest releases on PoL. Shadow Aesthetics is his eighth solo album for the label. Recent releases include Aberrant Lens (2017) and three collaborations with K. Leimer. Reissues include work on the acclaimed VOD box set American Cassette Culture, an upcoming Cherry Red compilation of seminal U.S. electronic music and the 1983 cassette, Music Works for Industry, now on vinyl. His work is also included in the collection of The British Library.
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